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(Slip Opinion)

(Slip Opinion)

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1
(Slip Opinion)
OCTOBER TERM, 2009Syllabus
NOTE: Where it is feasible, a syllabus (headnote) will be released, as isbeing done in connection with this case, at the time the opinion is issued.The syllabus constitutes no part of the opinion of the Court but has beenprepared by the Reporter of Decisions for the convenience of the reader.See
United States
v.
 Detroit Timber & Lumber Co.,
200 U. S. 321, 337.
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
Syllabus
MARYLAND
v
. SHATZER
CERTIORARI TO THE COURT OF APPEALS OF MARYLANDNo. 08–680. Argued October 5, 2009—Decided February 24, 2010In 2003, a police detective tried to question respondent Shatzer, whowas incarcerated at a Maryland prison pursuant to a prior conviction,about allegations that he had sexually abused his son. Shatzer in-voked his
Miranda
right to have counsel present during interroga-tion, so the detective terminated the interview. Shatzer was releasedback into the general prison population, and the investigation wasclosed. Another detective reopened the investigation in 2006 and at-tempted to interrogate Shatzer, who was still incarcerated. Shatzerwaived his
Miranda
rights and made inculpatory statements. Thetrial court refused to suppress those statements, reasoning that
Ed-wards
v.
 Arizona
, 451 U. S. 477, did not apply because Shatzer hadexperienced a break in
Miranda
custody prior to the 2006 interroga-tion. Shatzer was convicted of sexual child abuse. The Court of Ap-peals of Maryland reversed, holding that the mere passage of timedoes not end the
Edwards
protections, and that, assuming,
arguendo
,a break-in-custody exception to
Edwards
existed, Shatzer’s releaseback into the general prison population did not constitute such abreak.
Held:
Because Shatzer experienced a break in
Miranda
custody lastingmore than two weeks between the first and second attempts at inter-rogation,
Edwards
does not mandate suppression of his 2006 state-ments. Pp. 4–18.(a)
Edwards
created a presumption that once a suspect invokes the
Miranda
right to the presence of counsel, any waiver of that right inresponse to a subsequent police attempt at custodial interrogation isinvoluntary.
Edwards
’ fundamental purpose is to “[p]reserv[e] theintegrity of an accused’s choice to communicate with police onlythrough counsel,”
 Patterson
v.
Illinois
, 487 U. S. 285, 291, by “pre-vent[ing] police from badgering [him] into waiving his previously as-
 
2 MARYLAND
v.
SHATZERSyllabusserted
Miranda
rights,”
Michigan
v.
Harvey
, 494 U. S. 344, 350. It iseasy to believe that a suspect’s later waiver was coerced or badgeredwhen he has been held in uninterrupted
Miranda
custody since hisfirst refusal to waive. He remains cut off from his normal life andisolated in a “police-dominated atmosphere,”
Miranda
v.
 Arizona
, 384U. S. 436
,
456, where his captors “appear to control [his] fate,”
Illi-nois
v.
 Perkins
, 496 U. S. 292, 297. But where a suspect has been re-leased from custody and returned to his normal life for some time be-fore the later attempted interrogation, there is little reason to thinkthat his change of heart has been coerced. Because the
Edwards
pre-sumption has been established by opinion of this Court, it is appro-priate for this Court to specify the period of release from custody thatwill terminate its application. See
County of Riverside
v.
McLaugh-lin
, 500 U. S. 44. The Court concludes that the appropriate period is14 days, which provides ample time for the suspect to get reaccli-mated to his normal life, consult with friends and counsel, and shakeoff any residual coercive effects of prior custody. Pp. 4–13.(b) Shatzer’s release back into the general prison population consti-tutes a break in
Miranda
custody. Lawful imprisonment imposedupon conviction does not create the coercive pressures produced byinvestigative custody that justify
Edwards
. When previously incar-cerated suspects are released back into the general prison population,they return to their accustomed surroundings and daily routine— they regain the degree of control they had over their lives before theattempted interrogation. Their continued detention is relatively dis-connected from their prior unwillingness to cooperate in an investiga-tion. The “inherently compelling pressures” of custodial interrogationended when Shatzer returned to his normal life. Pp. 13–16.405 Md. 585, 954 A. 2d 1118, reversed and remanded.S
CALIA 
, J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which R
OBERTS
,C. J., and K 
ENNEDY 
, G
INSBURG
, B
REYER
,
LITO
, and S
OTOMAYOR
, JJ., joined, and in which T
HOMAS
, J., joined as to Part III. T
HOMAS
, J., filedan opinion concurring in part and concurring in the judgment. S
TE- VENS
, J., filed an opinion concurring in the judgment.
 
 _________________  _________________ 
1Cite as: 559 U. S. ____ (2010)Opinion of the Court
NOTICE: This opinion is subject to formal revision before publication in thepreliminary print of the United States Reports. Readers are requested tonotify the Reporter of Decisions, Supreme Court of the United States, Washington, D. C. 20543, of any typographical or other formal errors, in orderthat corrections may be made before the preliminary print goes to press.
SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES
No. 08–680
MARYLAND, PETITIONER
v.
MICHAEL BLAINE
SHATZER, S
R
.
ON WRIT OF CERTIORARI TO THE COURT OF APPEALS OF
MARYLAND
[February 24, 2010]
J
USTICE
S
CALIA 
delivered the opinion of the Court.We consider whether a break in custody ends the presumption of involuntariness established in
Edwards
v.
 Arizona
, 451 U. S. 477 (1981).IIn August 2003, a social worker assigned to the Child Advocacy Center in the Criminal Investigation Division of the Hagerstown Police Department referred to the department allegations that respondent Michael Shatzer,Sr., had sexually abused his 3-year-old son. At that time,Shatzer was incarcerated at the Maryland CorrectionalInstitution-Hagerstown, serving a sentence for an unrelated child-sexual-abuse offense. Detective Shane Blankenship was assigned to the investigation and interviewedShatzer at the correctional institution on August 7, 2003.Before asking any questions, Blankenship reviewedShatzer’s
Miranda
rights with him, and obtained a written waiver of those rights. When Blankenship explainedthat he was there to question Shatzer about sexuallyabusing his son, Shatzer expressed confusion—he hadthought Blankenship was an attorney there to discuss the

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