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Praises Work of Rail Battalions

Praises Work of Rail Battalions

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Published by: cunningb on Feb 24, 2010
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02/24/2010

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ttalions
•'Cpl.
Wendell
G.
Welsh
of
this
city
is
assisting
as
fireman
in a
Railway operating battalion
in
General
Pattpn's
Third Army.
At
the
present time
he is in
Luxem-
bourg. Following
are
exerpts
from
The
Railroad
Trainmen
Mag-
azine
exposing
the
daring
and
necessary
work being done
by the
members
of the
Army
Transporta-
i
lion Corps
in
Western
Europe,''Railroad
Trainmen from
all
over
the
United
States,
serving
with
the
Army TransportationCorps
in
Western Europe
are as-
sisting
in one of the
war's
out-
standing transport jobs. Working
alongside
railroaders from
Britain,
Canada,
France, Belgium, Holland
and
Luxembourg,
the
railroad
doughboys
for months have been
moving
masses
of men and
mater-
ials between
the
Cannel
Ports
and
Germany,
playing
an
invaluablerole
in
every advance
of our
,
.
armies."
"As the
Battle
of
Cherbourgreached
its
conclusion,
news
came
Irom
the Air
Forces
of
fifteen
locomotives
lined
up by the
Ger-
mans on an inclined track, ready
to
be run
oft
into the
sea
and so
rendered useless.
The
Transpor-
tation
Corps didn't like the ideaollosing
that
very valuable
equip-
ment,
and so an
urgent plea
was
sent
out.
Promptly
and
with
dis-
patch
the
ilying boys came
to the
rescue,
and by the
simple method
of
blowing
up the
tracks fore
and
alt
ol the
fifteen
machines,
ef-
I
actively
prevented
the
enemy
from
wrecking destruction. Next
day
Cherbourg
was in
Allied
hands
and
those
fifteen
locomo-tives soon were
on the job
moving
our
troops
and
supplies.""Trainmen working with
the
operating
battalions had to take
-ill
sorts
of
chances
on
those wild
runs
through Normandy, because
they
could
not
wait
for
signals
to
be
repaired
or
locomotive
water
tanks
to be
built.
Most signals
had
been
knocked
oul.
The
trains
»had
to run
without lights
because
ol
the
blackout
uilcs
and
brake-
men
were
without
lanterns,
but
this
did not
stop
the
determined
GT
railroaders,
for
..they
used
matches,
cigarette
lighters, and
even
the
tiny glow
from
their
eig-
'
?,
ro
«
es
.
_>°
furnish
light
to
read
'hen-
orders
The
age-old
Amer-
ican
Indian Method
of
employingsmoke signals
lor
communications
was
even
resorted to. The
water
situation
was
critical.
and the
j
crews
were
often foiced
to
bail
stagnant
water
from
ditches
and
i
streams"
I
M
30
ha
te
in
Ned
 
atw
Sc
C
ifChi
C
re
ca
on
 ar
gi
vo
M
enOre
K
mbabrbe
se
stpa
R
ph
be
 
tli
S
M
11
beXi
 
fo
 
of
 
Mi
de
S
(S
re
th
th
Be

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