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GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING CIRCULAR NO. 7 Soil Nail Walls

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING CIRCULAR NO. 7 Soil Nail Walls

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Published by vinceq1
This document presents information on the analysis, design, and construction of soil nail walls in highway applications. The main objective is to provide practitioners in this field with sound and simple methods and guidelines that will allow them to analyze, design, and construct safe and economical structures. This document updates information contained in FHWA-SA-96-069R (Byrne et al., 1998). The focus is on soil nailing techniques that are commonly used in the U.S. practice. The contents of this document include: an introduction, a chapter on applications and feasibility, descriptions and guidelines for field and laboratory testing in soil nailing applications, descriptions of the common U.S. practice, analysis and design of soil nail walls, chapters on contracting approach and technical specifications and design examples. Because of the popularity of the Allowable Stress Design (ASD) method [also known as Service Load Design (SLD)] among practitioners, the methods presented in this document are based on the ASD method.
This document presents information on the analysis, design, and construction of soil nail walls in highway applications. The main objective is to provide practitioners in this field with sound and simple methods and guidelines that will allow them to analyze, design, and construct safe and economical structures. This document updates information contained in FHWA-SA-96-069R (Byrne et al., 1998). The focus is on soil nailing techniques that are commonly used in the U.S. practice. The contents of this document include: an introduction, a chapter on applications and feasibility, descriptions and guidelines for field and laboratory testing in soil nailing applications, descriptions of the common U.S. practice, analysis and design of soil nail walls, chapters on contracting approach and technical specifications and design examples. Because of the popularity of the Allowable Stress Design (ASD) method [also known as Service Load Design (SLD)] among practitioners, the methods presented in this document are based on the ASD method.

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Published by: vinceq1 on Feb 26, 2010
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12/04/2012

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Technical Report Documentation Page
1. Report No.
FHWA
0-IF-03-017
2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No.5. Report Date
March 2003
4. Title and Subtitle
GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING CIRCULAR NO. 7Soil Nail Walls
 
6. Performing Organization Code7. Author(s)
Carlos A. Lazarte, Ph.D., P.E., Victor Elias, P.E., R. David Espinoza,Ph.D., P.E., Paul J.
Sabatini,
Ph.D., P.E.
8. Performing Organization Report No.10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)9. Performing Organization Name and Address
GeoSyntec Consultants10015 Old Columbia Road, Suite A-200Columbia, Maryland 21046
 
11. Contract or Grant No.
DTFH61-00-C-00109
 
13. Type of Report and Period Covered
Technical Manual, 2001-2002
 
12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address
Office of Technology ApplicationOffice of Engineering/Bridge DivisionFederal Highway AdministrationU.S. Department of Transportation400 Seventh Street, S.W.Washington, D.C. 20590
 
14. Sponsoring Agency Code15. Supplementary Notes
FHWA Technical Consultant: J.A. DiMaggio, P.E. (HIBT-20)Contracting Officer Technical Representative (COTR): Chien-Tan Chang (HTA-22)
 
16. Abstract
This document presents information on the analysis, design, and construction of soil nail walls inhighway applications. The main objective is to provide practitioners in this field with sound and simplemethods and guidelines that will allow them to analyze, design, and construct safe and economicalstructures. This document updates information contained in FHWA-SA-96-069R (Byrne et al., 1998).The focus is on soil nailing techniques that are commonly used in the U.S. practice. The contents of this document include: an introduction, a chapter on applications and feasibility, descriptions andguidelines for field and laboratory testing in soil nailing applications, descriptions of the common U.S. practice, analysis and design of soil nail walls, chapters on contracting approach and technicalspecifications and design examples. Because of the popularity of the Allowable Stress Design (ASD)method [also known as Service Load Design (SLD)] among practitioners, the methods presented in thisdocument are based on the ASD method.
17. Key Word
soil nailing, soil nail walls, soil nail testing,shotcrete, soil nail wall design, soil nailingspecifications
18. Distribution Statement
 No restrictions.
19. Security Classification (of this report)
Unclassified
20. Security Classification (of this page)
Unclassified
21. No. of Pages
XXX
22. Price
Form DOT F 1700.7
 
Reproduction of completed page authorized
 
GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING CIRCULAR NO. 7Soil Nail Walls
 Publication FHWA-IF-03-017 
 ERRATA AND COMMENTARY
ERRATA
1)
 
Chapter 5, Section 5.4.3., Page 73, definition of H
1:
 The correct definition of H
1
is:H
1
= H + (B –H tan
) tan
β
eq
 If the slope has a uniform slope and no break within a horizontal distance 2H  from the wall (e.g., ground surface shown as a solid line in Figure ER-1), the slope is considered “infinite” and 
 β 
eq
=
 β 
. If the slope has a break within a distance 2H from the wall (e.g., ground surface shown as dashed line in Figure ER-1), the equivalent slope inclination is
 β 
eq
= tan
-1
 H/2H), where
 H is the slope rise over 2H.
B
L
Q
H
1
H
eq
2 H
H
R
n
H/3

eq
Broken slope:
 
eq
=
tan
-1
(
H2H
)
P
A
Infinite slope:
 
eq
=
 
EV
 
FIGURE ER-1: Wall Geometry
2)
 
Chapter 5, Section 5.4.4., Fig. 5.8, Page 76The figure is replaced to amend the depth of slip surface in case a) and to addclarity. In this figure, Q
DC
refers to the dead load.- 1 -
 
H = Excavation depthB
e
= Excavation widthL
e
= Excavation Lengthb) Shallow deposit of soft fine-grained soilunderlain by stiff layerc) Bearing Capacity Factor, N
C
HSH
u
softfine-grainedsoila) Deep deposit of soft fine-grained soil
 HSH
u
Failure surface
(width of excavation is typically very large)
softfine-grainedsoil
B
e
D
B
D
B
34512475869100
 
B
e
 /L
e
= 0 (Long, rectang. excav.)N
C
H/B
e
B
e
 /L
e
= 1 (Square Excav.)B
e
 /L
e
= 0.5
HB
e
2
B
e
2
B
e
HB
e
Q
DC
Q
DC
 3)
 
The correct equation for an active passive state is:
    
2'45tan
2A
 
 4)
 
Chapter 5, Section 5.5.3., Fig. 5.13.To make sure that a reader understands that the Byrne et al. (1998) model presented in this figure is not a representation of service loads within the nail, the figureis replaced by the following figure. The text does not need to be modified.- 2 -

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