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Rework by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson - Excerpt: Fire the Workaholics

Rework by Jason Fried & David Heinemeier Hansson - Excerpt: Fire the Workaholics

Ratings:

3.8

(243)
|Views: 1,199 |Likes:
From the founders of the trailblazing software company 37signals, here is a different kind of business book – one that explores a new reality. Today, anyone can be in business. Tools that used to be out of reach are now easily accessible. Technology that cost thousands is now just a few bucks or even free. Stuff that was impossible just a few years ago is now simple. That means anyone can start a business. And you can do it without working miserable 80-hour weeks or depleting your life savings. You can start it on the side while your day job provides all the cash flow you need. Forget about business plans, meetings, office space – you don't need them.

With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who's ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs who want to get out, and artists who don't want to starve anymore will all find valuable inspiration and guidance in these pages. It's time to rework work.
From the founders of the trailblazing software company 37signals, here is a different kind of business book – one that explores a new reality. Today, anyone can be in business. Tools that used to be out of reach are now easily accessible. Technology that cost thousands is now just a few bucks or even free. Stuff that was impossible just a few years ago is now simple. That means anyone can start a business. And you can do it without working miserable 80-hour weeks or depleting your life savings. You can start it on the side while your day job provides all the cash flow you need. Forget about business plans, meetings, office space – you don't need them.

With its straightforward language and easy-is-better approach, Rework is the perfect playbook for anyone who's ever dreamed of doing it on their own. Hardcore entrepreneurs, small-business owners, people stuck in day jobs who want to get out, and artists who don't want to starve anymore will all find valuable inspiration and guidance in these pages. It's time to rework work.

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Publish date: Mar 9, 2010
Added to Scribd: Feb 26, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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08/10/2014

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Buy the book: www.37signals.com/rework
 
 Workaholism
Our culture celebrates the idea of the workaholic. Wehear about people burning the midnight oil. They pull all-nighters and sleep at the office. It’s considered abadge of honor to kill yourself over a project. Noamount of work is too much work.Not only is this workaholism unnecessary, it’s stu-pid. Working more doesn’t mean you care more or getmore done. It just means you work more. Workaholics wind up creating more problems thanthey solve. First off, working like that just isn’t sustain-able over time. When the burnout crash comes—and it  will—it’ll hit that much harder. Workaholics miss the point, too. They try to fixproblems by throwing sheer hours at them. They try tomake up for intellectual laziness with brute force. Thisresults in inelegant solutions.They even create crises. They don’t look for ways tobe more efficient because they actually 
like 
 workingovertime. They enjoy feeling like heroes. They createproblems (often unwittingly) just so they can get off on working more. Workaholics make the people who don’t stay latefeel inadequate for “merely” working reasonable hours.That leads to guilt and poor morale all around. Plus, it
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Buy the book: www.37signals.com/rework

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john_pappas_35 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
So. A quick read. Some good points. Some overstated points. Overall, I liked it. A good reminder to look past all the strategic plans, policies and organizational charts and work for love of product and customer. Basically, at its essence, this book is about avoiding burnout more than it is about starting a business. It is about working smart and not hard.
fouad_bendris reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The power of Say NO by default and when ASAP is Poison ! Once again this is a kind of Manifesto & Controversy book. He provides us with daily brainstorming exercises to get rid of preconceived ideas and therefore «real world». This is particular useful to jeopardize Big Data trends and correctly manage new Businesses opportunities. My new leitmotiv would be Do More with less! Saturday, Sept 15 - 2012
stringsn88keys reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Amazingly, the things that appealed to me in this book should be business common sense, such as rejecting the idea of a mission statement and the "false apology". I wish this were a staple of corporate culture instead of pop business books.
gshuk_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This audio will expose you to non-traditional, minimalist business practices that will make you think. It is a short motivational Seth Godin's type audio. Unfortunately, it's like a horoscope. People will feel validated that others think the same way when they only took the controversial ideas they liked and ignored the ones they didn't. Worth reading taken with a grain of salt.
vitorhugo_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Wise unorthodox tips on how to run a business, in a minimalist way, while disclosing the anachronisms of large, fat, corporations.Simple, clever, easy to read.
jerrycolonna reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Finally read this. Chock full of great pithy material. The drawings are a equal part of the fun. Not heavy on theory but that's the point...they keep it simple, just the like and the products. Provoked me to think a lot about my own work and the drive (somewhat externally generated to grow and expand).
fsmichaels reviewed this
Rated 3/5
This is a pretty solid 3.5 stars for me. A fast read. Examples throughout are typically from mainstream sources so the stories aren't anything particularly new, but some good reminders that help you keep moving forward on your projects whether you're in business or not.
themadturtle reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I recommend this to anyone that works in an office setting - be you an entrepreneur or someone working in a cube farm - working for a huge company or a small startup. There's a lot of good info here, to be sure. Some of it reads too much like the "young, hipster rebel" and comes off a little trite as a result. However, there's definitely a lot of truth in the book as well. Some of the things, I'm sure you've heard before, but that doesn't make it less meaningful. This is a very quick read that is full of useful gems of information. I keep it at my desk in case anyone wants me to come up with an opening thought for a meeting.
mbarylak_2 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Many 'Aha's, some surprises, few 'Oh no's!
jeffv_19 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
The authors of ReWork run a small, software development company based in Chicago. Their meager staff of 16 is global, however. The book is about focusing on core competency and focusing on what you do best. They believe in targeted products with limited functionality -- the kitchen sink approach leads to escalating costs with little pay-off. This philosophy is applied to all other aspects of business too -- from hiring people of certain skill sets and ability, to marketing and PR functions. The authors also caution against over-expansion, particularly in the manner of increasing capacity to serve a single customer. Loss of that customer could result in rapid downsizing, and an anything that jeopardizing serving other existing customers attracted by your product and service could prove disastrous. Knowing when to let a customer go, in their opinion, is as important as attracting a new customer. ReWork contains sound advice for small companies that can succeed with a tight focus. Avoiding the growth of a corporate bureaucracy can help keep small (and perhaps mid-sized) companies more nimble and adaptable. By design, it prevents growth into large companies, however. It is sound advice for the many businesses that will never rise above small business, however. This is not an MBA-level business analysis, it's short and easily comprehended by those who might desire some business advice but lack a formal business background (but have salable business ideas or skills).

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