Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
England, Ford, and Krekel (2007) - Ensuring Success for First-Generation Students: Providing Mentorship Through FYSM

England, Ford, and Krekel (2007) - Ensuring Success for First-Generation Students: Providing Mentorship Through FYSM

Ratings: (0)|Views: 145 |Likes:
Published by zackford
This is the final report for a class assignment at Iowa State University. The assignment was to apply theory to practice in the development of an intervention, preparing all materials that would be necessary to implement the intervention. Our intervention, FYSM (First Year Student Mentors), was a mentorship program for first-generation students.
This is the final report for a class assignment at Iowa State University. The assignment was to apply theory to practice in the development of an intervention, preparing all materials that would be necessary to implement the intervention. Our intervention, FYSM (First Year Student Mentors), was a mentorship program for first-generation students.

More info:

Published by: zackford on Feb 26, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/26/2010

pdf

text

original

 
FGS Success 1Running head: FIRST-GENERATION STUDENT SUCCESSEnsuring Success for First-Generation Students:Providing Mentorship Through FYSMTricia L. England, Zachary T. Ford, and Andrea C. KrekelIowa State University
 
FGS Success 2Ensuring Success for First-Generation Students:Providing Mentorship Through FYSMThe Issue
Overview of Issue
First-generation college students face many unique challenges as they transition to theuniversity environment. Because of the distinct perspective these students bring to the universityculture, their retention is vital. Universities must be prepared to offer resources and support thatcater to the specific challenges these students face. It is not only important to equip them for academic success, but for social survival in an environment for which they likely have littlecontext.In this report, we analyze the research about the experiences of first-generation studentsand introduce an intervention we believe will successfully address the identified issues. We baseour program, FYSM (First Year Student Mentors), on successful mentorship models, rooted indevelopmental theory.
The Setting 
The intervention takes place at Iowa State University, a large public land grant institutionin the Midwest, currently enrolling over 26,000 students. Despite the fact that the number of open-option first generation students fluctuates from year to year, they are an important population of students who need extra support to succeed. As each week focuses on a differentarea of student affairs, students would experience a variety of different programs, taking part inmany academic and social events. Student organizations, academic success center, financial aidoffice, and the writing lab will be a few of the areas included in this program. Student affairs professionals will provide support throughout the semester, with the possibility of directly
 
FGS Success 3assisting mentors and mentees with issues that arise. Most of the students will live in residencehalls making inclusion of community advisors and hall personnel a priority.
 Literature Review
According to Inkelas, Daver, Vogt, and Leonard (2007), research defines first-generationcollege students in a variety of ways. Some definitions include only those students whose parentshave absolutely no college experience, while others define first-generation students as thosestudents whose parents did not earn a bachelor’s degree but may have some amount of collegeexperience. Although most institutions do not track this population, Inkelas et al. point out thatmost researchers agree that the number of first-generation students in higher education isincreasing. Counted or not, these students face many challenges, especially during their first year in college.Inkelas et al. (2007) described some of the characteristics of first-generation students incomparison to those students whose parents earned at least a bachelor’s degree. First-generationstudents tend to come from families of lower income, are more likely to be a member of aracial/ethnic minority, and tend to get less support from family. Inkelas et al. went on to say,“First-generation students enrolled in and earned fewer credits, worked more hours, lived off campus, participated less in and out of class activities, had fewer non-academic peer interactions,and earned lower grades” (p. 405). Inkelas et al. also stated that first-generation students aretwice as likely to leave four-year institutions before the second year and less likely to return,compared to students whose parents earned at least a bachelor’s degree. According to Bui(2002), although first-generation students are more likely to start at two-year institutions, theyare more likely to obtain a bachelor’s degree when they begin their education at four-year institutions. Of the first-generation students who started college in the 1989-90 academic year,

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->