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Sakurai Ch 6

Sakurai Ch 6

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Solution of Modern Quantum Mechanics (J.J.Sakurai), Chapter 6
Solution of Modern Quantum Mechanics (J.J.Sakurai), Chapter 6

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Published by: glog on May 01, 2008
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06/19/2013

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Sakurai Ch.6 Problems 1-7
Michael GoodFebruary 27, 2005
1 Sakurai 6.1
A. N identical spin 
1
/
2
particles are subjected to a one-dimensional simple har-monics oscillator potential. What is the ground-state energy? What is the Fermi energy? 
The particles are spin 1
/
2 and only fermions have half-integer spin. Fermionsalso obey the Pauli exclusion principle, which states that no two fermions canoccupy the same state. Thus, not all the particles will occupy the ground stateenergy of the 1D harmonic oscillator. They end up piling up on each other untilthey are pushed up to higher and higher energy states. If you begin countingat
n
= 0 for the 1st particle, and
n
= 1 for the 2nd particle, then both occupythe lowest energy( (1
/
2)¯
), one particle having spin up, and one having spindown. Therefore, it is best to say you have a total of 
N/
2 particles and sum uponly the spin up(or spin down) and multiply the sum by 2. Then you will havethe total sum of energies for all the particles, where the nth energy level is:
n
= (
n
+ 1
/
2)¯
First I will sssume I have an even total number of particles, 2 for each energystate. I will start summing at
n
= 0 and the sum will go to
N/
2
1. So, summingup the energies of the particles for
N/
2 particles and multiplying by 2 yeilds:
grdEven
= 2
N/
2
1
n
=0
(
n
+ 1
/
2)¯
=
2[(1
/
2) + (
N/
2
1) + 1
/
2)2] =
2
4¯
If you assume that we have an odd number of total particles, then sum willgo to
N/
2
1
/
2 because there is only one in the top energy state. It is the lastfermion that is the odd one out in the most energetic state.
grdOdd
= 2
N/
2
1
/
2
n
=0
(
n
+1
/
2)¯
=
2[1
/
2 +
N/
2
1
/
2 + 1
/
22] =
2
+
4¯
1
 
What is the Fermi energy? 
The Fermi energy is the maximum or highest state of energy that is occupied.Cohen-Tannoudji [p.1398] defines the Fermi energy as the highest individualenergy found in the ground state. The unluckiest fermion with the highestenergy is the last one marked
N/
2
1. Its energy is found using
n
.
FermiEven
= (
N/
2
1 + 1
/
2)¯
= (
1)¯
2For an odd number of particles, the highest individual energy found is heldby the fermion marked
N/
2
1
/
2. Its energy can also be plugged into
n
.
FermiOdd
= (
N/
2
1
/
2 + 1
/
2)¯
=
2¯
B. What are the ground state and Fermi energies if we ignore the mutual interactions and assume N to be very large? 
If N is very large, then it doesn’t really matter whether we have an evenor an odd number of particles. One extra particle isn’t going to make muchdifference when we are talking about such a huge energy. Thus, the groundstate energies (as well as the Fermi energies) for both an odd and even amountof particles can be approximated to be the same:As
then
Fermi
=
2¯
and
ground
=
2
4¯
2 Sakurai 6.2
It is obvious that two nonidentical spin 1 particles with no orbital angular mo-menta (that is, s-states for both) can form j=0, j=1, and j=2. Suppose, however,that the two particles are identical. What restrictions do we get? 
It is not obvious to the novice quantum mechanics student that j=0, j=1, and j=2 for total angular momentum formed for two nonidentical spin 1 particleswith l=0. A careful derivation of:
=
j
1
+
 j
2
,j
1
+
 j
2
1
,j
1
+
 j
2
2
,...,
|
 j
1
 j
2
|
is given in Cohen-Tannoudji 1977, p. 1017, that explains the pattern and whythe total angular momentum ranges from
=
s
1
+
s
2
= 0 (if one particle is spin-1 and the other is spin +1) to
=
s
1
+
s
2
= 2 (if both particles are spin +1).Thus leading to the values, 0, 1, and 2. A more simple walk-through is givenby Griffiths p. 167, but he also refers to the proof of Cohen-Tannoudji.Spin 1 particles are bosons. Empirically, a system of N identical parti-cles that are totally symmetrical under the interchange of any pair are called2
 
bosons. Thus, the total wavefunctions we are dealing with are symmetric un-der interchange. The l=0 requirement dictates that the spatial wavefunctionis symmetric. Thus we need to impose the restriction that only symmetricClebsch-Gordon combinations are allowed, i.e. that only symmetric spin wavefunctions are allowed.For the values of j=0, 1, and 2, the following expression for changing theorder of the two particles is useful:
 j
2
,j
1
;
m
2
,m
1
|
 j,m
= (
1)
j
1
+
j
2
j
 j
1
,j
2
;
m
1
,m
2
|
 j,m
This symmetry relation is found in Cohen-Tannoudji p. 1041. Here the signis of most concern. If the sign is positive, then the interchange is symmetric.If the sign is negative, then the interchange is antisymmetric and should bedisregarded. In our case, both particles are spin 1,
j
1
=
j
2
=
s
= 1 thereforethe sign term is (
1)
2
j
. For various values of j only even values will createa symmetric interchange of particles. Therefore only the states with j=0, and j=2 are allowed.
3 Sakurai 6.3
Discuss what would happen to the energy levels of a helium atom if the electron were a spinless boson. Be as quantitative as you can.
This problem illustrates a quantuum mechanical effect due to particle iden-tity. Assuming that the electron has a symmetric wave function under inter-change, i.e. is a boson, and that its spin happens to be zero, we have a situationvery similiar to the spin singlet state for the helium atom. The spin singlet statehas total spin zero,
1
/
2 + 1
/
2 = 0 and a symmetric space function. For thespin singlet case, the electrons have a tendency to come close to each other re-sulting in appreciable electrostatic repulsion and more excitation (higher energylevels). As for a quantitative description, the spatial wave function is alwayssymmetrical(thus
+
and not
), and the energy of state (1s)(nl) is:
=
100
+
nlm
+ ∆
with
=
e
2
r
12
=
+
where both I and J are positive defined in Sakurai (6.4.19):
=
 
d
2
x
1
 
d
3
x
2
|
ψ
100
(
x
1
)
|
2
|
ψ
nlm
(
x
2
)
|
2
e
2
r
12
=
 
d
2
x
1
 
d
3
x
2
ψ
100
(
x
1
)
ψ
nlm
(
x
2
)
e
2
r
12
ψ
100
(
x
2
)
ψ
nlm
(
x
1
)This should push the energy levels higher for the helium atom, leaving theground state the same.3

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