Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
18Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Edward Said Contrapuntal

Edward Said Contrapuntal

Ratings: (0)|Views: 958|Likes:
Published by theolog3n1

More info:

Published by: theolog3n1 on Mar 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/07/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Edward Said's Culture and Imperialism: A SymposiumAuthor(s): Bruce Robbins, Mary Louise Pratt, Jonathan Arac, R. Radhakrishnan, Edward SaidSource:
Social Text,
No. 40 (Autumn, 1994), pp. 1-24Published by: Duke University PressStable URL:
Accessed: 10/02/2010 11:30
Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available athttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unlessyou have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and youmay use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.Please contact the publisher regarding any further use of this work. Publisher contact information may be obtained athttp://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=duke.Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printedpage of such transmission.JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
 Duke University Press
is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to
Social Text.
http://www.jstor.org
 
EdwardSaid's CultureandImperialism
ASYMPOSIUMBruceRobbins: IntroductionBetween theappearanceof Orientalismn1978 and CultureandImperial-ism in thespringof1993,there have been someinterestingandparadox-icalyears.EdwardSaidhas done agreatdealofpoliticalwritingaboutthePalestinians and Americanforeignpolicy,andhe has become apublic fig-ure in a sense thatwouldapplytoveryfewliterarycritics,howeverrespected.Buthe hasnot hadthesortofpublicinfluence he desired.Americanpolicytoward the Middle East has remainedgrimlyconsistent,as has thequalityofpublicdiscourse abouttheworldofnations. WhereSaid's influence hasbeenoverwhelming,on the otherhand,isamongaca-demicdisciplines-adomain that he has often beentemptedto dismiss asspecialized,professionalized, politically unpromising.This has invitedotherparadoxes.Howisit thatOrientalism,which insisted sostronglyontheuninterrupted,unrelievedpervasivenessofOrientalisttropesinWest-ernculture,should besopassionatelyacclaimedandimitated inlargesections ofthe Westernacademy?Howis itthatpointingoutthecom-plicityof culture withimperialismcouldalsoservetoreinvigoratethestudyof cultureand,for thatmatter,provokestudents of cultureinto acampaignofdisciplinary imperialisminwhichthey"colonized"theterri-toryof otherdisciplines?Howis it that this couldbe,asIthink it oftenis,a"good"imperialism?Andhowisit,finally,thatpointingout the com-plicitiesofknowledgewithpowercouldservetodemonstrate,as I think ithas,thedignityandvalue of intellectualwork,the laborofthoughtthat isabsolutelyirreducibletoanysocialcollectivityto which either itssubjector itsobjectmightbelong?Thesequestionssuggestthat Edward Said hasinlarge partcreatedthe audiencebywhichhe is nowenjoyed-whichis also the audience thatnowquestionsandcontestshim,thecontestbeinganindispensablepartoftheenjoyment.The fifteenyearsthatseparateCultureandImperialismrom Oriental-ismhaveperhapsinevitablypromptedanorgyofstocktakingaboutthedirectionof Said's careerand about the directionof colonial andpost-colonialstudies,fields hedid so much togetstarted and toshape.Thecontributionsgatheredhere,which wereoriginally presentedatthe con-vention of the ModernLanguageAssociationinTorontoin December1993,werean effortto have a share of thefun. That isprobablyall theintroductiontheyneed.
 
MaryLouise PrattAs a member of agenerationof scholarswhoseintellectualtrajectoryhasbeenfundamentallyinfluencedbytheworkandthevoiceofEdwardSaid,Iampleasedtoparticipatein thisdialogueabouthis newestbook,CultureandImperialism,and to honor Said himself as anintellectual, scholar,andactivist.Myremarks here will take the form ofsomethinglikeanoralbookreview,in which Iwill discuss CultureandImperialismmainlyon itsownterms,thatis,within theparametersofprintculture and writtenartandthought.What is theprojectof Culture andImperialism?AsIreadit,Said'sbookseeks to advance or consolidate what Saidrefers to as "ahugeandremarkableadjustmentinperspectiveandunderstanding"(243)-apar-adigmshift,ifyoulike,in which it becomesnormative to see theWestasfundamentallyconstitutedbyitsimperial enterprises,asunthinkableapartfrom them. In the firsthalfof thebook,devotedtocanonicalEnglishand Frenchfiction,thespecificallyliteraryprojectis toshowthat"imperialismand thenovel fortifiedeachother tosuch adegreethatitisimpossibletoreadone withoutinsomewaydealingwith the other"(71).Theassumption,acorrectone,isthatWestern culture and criticaltheoryhave exhibiteda"massive avoidance" ofimperialismasconstitu-tive ofmetropolitansociety,culture,andconsciousness.Highculture,Saidargues,hasparticularlyescapedscrutiny"for itsroleinshapingtheimperial dynamic"and has been"mysteriouslyexemptedfromanalysiswheneverthecauses,benefits,and evilsofimperialismwerediscussed"(60).Andyet,asSaidundertakestoshow,thetexts ofEuropean highculture areconsistentlyandfundamentallyengagedwith-and on thewholecomplicitwith-theimperial enterprise.Hence,asheputsit,itis"possible[and,onemightadd,necessary]toreinterpretthe westerncul-tural archive asiffracturedgeographically bytheactivatedimperialdivide"(50).Thisprojectofreinterpretation givesusthemasterfulclosereadingsthatformanyreadersmakeupthecore ofCulture andImperialism-howMansfieldPark"synchronizesdomestic withinternationalauthority"(87);Aidaas a"hybridradically impureworkthatbelongsequallyto thehistoryofculture and theexperienceofoverseas domination"(114);Camus asexhibiting"anextraordinarilybelated,insomewaysincapacitatedcolonialsensibility"(176);hisAlgeriannarrativesasa"metropolitantransfigura-tionofthe colonialdilemma"inwhich the"tragichuman seriousnessofthe colonial effort achieves itslastgreatclarification"(184);Yeatsassoci-ated"both with thepoetryofdecolonization andresistance,andwiththehistoricalalternativestothe nativistimpasse" (232).Iquotetheselinesnotjustfor theireloquence,butby wayofremindingthose of us whohaveASymposiumon

Activity (18)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Sergio Mas liked this
mogessol liked this
mogessol liked this
schreamonn5515 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->