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Repetitive Scheduling Method - Project Planning & Scheduling

Repetitive Scheduling Method - Project Planning & Scheduling

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CENTER FORCONSTRUCTIONENGINEERINGANDMANAGEMENT
REPETITIVE SCHEDULING METHOD
byRobert B. Harris and Photios G. Ioannou
UMCEE Report No. 98-35Civil and Environmental Engineering DepartmentUNIVERSITY OF MICHIGANAnn Arbor, MichiganNovember 1998Copyright 1991-98 by Robert B. Harris and Photios G. Ioannou
 
Robert B. Harris and Photios G. IoannouRepetitive Scheduling Method
-ii-
REPETITIVE SCHEDULING METHODTABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION...............................................................................................................1CPM MULTI-UNIT SCHEDULING..................................................................................2RSM SCHEDULE REPRESENTATION...........................................................................3RSM ACTIVITY LOGIC....................................................................................................4Activity Logic Constraints......................................................................................4RESOURCE CONSIDERATIONS....................................................................................5BASIC RSM CONCEPTS..................................................................................................7Finish to Start Relationships in RSM with Convergence........................................7Finish to Start Relationships in RSM with Divergence..........................................9Effects from Changing Unit Production Rates on FTS Activities........................10Start to Start Relationships in RSM with Convergence........................................10Start to Start Relationships in RSM with Divergence...........................................11Increasing Unit Production Rates on STS Activities............................................12Finish to Finish Relationships in RSM with Convergence...................................13Finish to Finish Relationships in RSM with Divergence......................................13Increasing Unit Production Rates on FTF Activities............................................14DIAGRAMMING CONVENTIONS................................................................................15DIAGRAMS WITH LENGTH UNITS.............................................................................16Unit Production Rate Adjustments in Diagrams With Length Units....................17RSM DIAGRAM CONSTRUCTION...............................................................................17THE CONTROLLING SEQUENCE................................................................................20REDUCING THE PROJECT DURATION......................................................................21A PARADOX....................................................................................................................22ROTATING MULTIPLE PRODUCTION LINES...........................................................23INTEGRATING CPM WITH RSM..................................................................................24CONCLUDING REMARKS............................................................................................27REFERENCES..................................................................................................................29
 
REPETITIVE SCHEDULINGMETHOD
INTRODUCTION
Construction contractors often encounter projects that contain several identical orsimilar units, such as floors in multistory buildings, houses in housing developments,meters in pipelines, or stations in highways. These multi-unit projects are characterizedby repeating activities, which in most instances arise from the subdivision of ageneralized activity into specific activities associated with particular units. For example,a
Paint Walls
activity for a multistory building may be broken into
Paint First Floor Walls, Paint Second Floor Walls
, and so forth, where each floor is a significant unit of theoverall project.Activities that repeat from unit to unit create a very important need for aconstruction schedule that facilitates the uninterrupted flow of resources (i.e., work crews) from one unit to the next, since it is often this requirement that establishes activitystarting times and determines the overall project duration. Hence, uninterrupted resourceutilization becomes an extremely important issue.The scheduling problem posed by multi-unit projects with repeating activities isakin to the minimization of the project duration subject to resource continuity constraintsas well as technical precedence constraints. The uninterrupted deployment of resources isnot a problem addressed by the Critical Path Method (CPM), nor by its resource-orientedextensions, such as time-cost tradeoff, limited resource allocation, and resource leveling.However, this need for the uninterrupted utilization of resources from an activity inone unit to the same (repeating) activity in the next unit is explicitly recognized byseveral scheduling methodologies that have been available for many years and have beencalled by a number of different names. For projects with discrete units, such as floors,houses, apartments, stores, or offices, names that have been used include:
 Line of Balance
(LOB) (O’Brien 1969, Carr and Meyer 1974, Halpin and Woodhead 1976, Harris andEvans 1977);
Construction Planning Technique
(CPT)
 
(Peer 1974, Selinger 1980);
Vertical Production Method 
(VPM) (O’Brien 1975, Barrie and Paulson 1978);
Time- Location Matrix Model
(Birrell 1980);
Time Space Scheduling Method 
(Stradal andCacha 1982);
 Disturbance Scheduling
(Whitman and Irwig 1988); or HVLS:
 Horizontaland Vertical Logic Scheduling for Multistory Projects
(Thabet and Beliveau 1994).For highways, pipelines, tunnels, etc., where progress is measured in terms of horizontal length, the names used have included:
Time Versus Distance Diagrams
(Gorman 1972);
 Linear Balance Charts
(Barrie and Paulson 1978);
Velocity Diagrams
(Dressler 1980); or
 Linear Scheduling Method 
(LSM) (Johnston 1981, Chrzanowski andJohnston 1986, Russell and Casselton 1988).

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