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Corporate Social Media White Paper Pt 4

Corporate Social Media White Paper Pt 4

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Published by Nick Johnson
This pdf is the final part of a 4-part white paper on corporate social media use.

The white paper comes in four parts:

1) An evaluation of where social media for business is right now
2) An investigation into how social media has changed the definition of corporate communications
3) Case Studies on how 7 leading companies use social media - from Dell, Starbucks, Intel, Ford, IBM, Pepsi and Disney
4) Predictions on how corporate social media will develop in the future

You can sign up to be emailed all four parts when available at http://usefulsocialmedia.com/?utm_source=Scribd&utm_medium=White%2BPaper&utm_campaign=Pt4.
This pdf is the final part of a 4-part white paper on corporate social media use.

The white paper comes in four parts:

1) An evaluation of where social media for business is right now
2) An investigation into how social media has changed the definition of corporate communications
3) Case Studies on how 7 leading companies use social media - from Dell, Starbucks, Intel, Ford, IBM, Pepsi and Disney
4) Predictions on how corporate social media will develop in the future

You can sign up to be emailed all four parts when available at http://usefulsocialmedia.com/?utm_source=Scribd&utm_medium=White%2BPaper&utm_campaign=Pt4.

More info:

Published by: Nick Johnson on Mar 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/11/2010

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Corporate social media:
an investigation into therelationship between businessand social media, with7 real-world case studies
Part our
Report produced in partnership by Jonathan Ballantine and Nick Johnson
 
Social media has been a quick success – and one that caught many by surprise.In less than a decade we have seen a massive shift in the way content is beinggenerated and distributed across global communities.
We may be witnessing the beginning of the end of the business-as-usual landscape: wehave seen the collapse of GM and Lehman Brothers; revolt at the culture of excessivebonuses and, in Britain, MPs’ expenses; not to mention the near economic collapse ofIceland and Greece.These incidents are converging and, as we move forward, changing the way businessesbehave. Today there are greater demands on corporations by stakeholders foraccountability and transparency. Simultaneously, social media continues to innovate andproliferate mainstream culture.Somewhat paradoxically, social media engagement can both foster and hinder anorganisation’s progress towards greater accountability and transparency.On the one hand, social media has the power to rapidly fuel negative messages among
inuential external communities. On the other, with careful planning social media
engagement can be used to target your audience and engage them about the work youare doing – and can provide enormous opportunities such as third-party recommendations
that can affect brand reputation and long-term nancial performance.
 A company’s communications team has a key role to play in the internal developmentof social media engagement, by incorporating key components of social media withinthe organisational communication strategy. However, if the two fundamental principlesof social media engagement are authenticity and transparency, then social media cannotbe the exclusive domain of the communications department in the longer term. To fullyrealise the potential of social media, organisations need to make it a part of their DNA byembedding social media practices across the business – with all employees acting asambassadors.
In many cases, specic business units such as R&D, product design, purchasing or
logistics are better placed to engage at the micro-level and convey a company’s message
to their specic communities, rather than working through a centralised communicator.Marketing and customer service can benet immensely, and senior management can
go a long way towards humanising a company through their participation. All of this can
generate signicant upside in the form of brand equity, product development, research
data, and much more.Only this next level of social media engagement, where organisations are generatinghighly-focused, micro-engagements that foster organic conversation, will help turn“followers” into brand advocates.
Fromfollowingto leading
2
Meet and learn from expert corporate social media practitioners in person at the
Corporate Social Media Summit – nd out more at
usefulsocialmedia.com
This is end o Part our o our White paper. Parts one, two and threehave been released and are available atuseulsocialmedia.com

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