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Wind Resource Development in the Minnesota Coastal Zone (306-02-08)

Wind Resource Development in the Minnesota Coastal Zone (306-02-08)

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Wind development is one of the fastest growing sectors in the energy industry today. Under the right conditions it can be a large and sustainable local economic development opportunity. Current wind resource estimates (i.e. MN DOC) for the Lake Superior Coastal Zone indicate that we have a poor wind resource not suitable for development. These wind resource estimates are based on climatological modeling, and are no substitute for site-specific measurements.

This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program. We would also like to thank the U of MN’s Northeast Region Sustainable Development Partnership (NMSDP), Minnesota’s NE Region Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTS), and UMD’s College of Liberal Arts for critical matching project funds.
Wind development is one of the fastest growing sectors in the energy industry today. Under the right conditions it can be a large and sustainable local economic development opportunity. Current wind resource estimates (i.e. MN DOC) for the Lake Superior Coastal Zone indicate that we have a poor wind resource not suitable for development. These wind resource estimates are based on climatological modeling, and are no substitute for site-specific measurements.

This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program. We would also like to thank the U of MN’s Northeast Region Sustainable Development Partnership (NMSDP), Minnesota’s NE Region Clean Energy Resource Teams (CERTS), and UMD’s College of Liberal Arts for critical matching project funds.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Minnesota's Lake Superior Coastal Program on Mar 09, 2010
Copyright:Public Domain

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10/28/2014

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Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program
Wind Resource Development in the Minnesota Coastal Zone
Michael Mageau, Brody Sunderland and Stacey Stark University of Minnesota, DuluthCenter for Sustainable Community DevelopmentDepartment of Geography328 CINA Hall218-726-6133August 30, 2008
Project No. 306-02-08Contract No. A92528
This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake SuperiorCoastal Program.
 
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Acknowledgements
We would like to thank the following individuals for their many contributions to this project.UMD students Nick Salo, Nick Entinger, Janelle Stauff, Nicole Hynum and Melissa Wenker forall their work on the project. We would also like to thank UMD’s Linda Klint and Kirsten Lienfor their work on project budgets, invoinces and accounting. As well as the Minnnesota CoastalZone’s Karla Sundberg and Pat Collins for their advice and guidance over the entire course of the project. Finally, we would like to thank our numerous community partners from eachmonitoring site for their support, cooperation, interest and past/current/future wind developmententhusiasm and planning.This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake SuperiorCoastal Program. We would also like to thank the U of MN’s Northeast Region SustainableDevelopment Partnership (NMSDP), Minnesota’s NE Region Clean Energy Resource Teams(CERTS), and UMD’s College of Liberal Arts for critical matching project funds.
Introduction
Wind development is one of the fastest growing sectors in the energy industry today. Under theright conditions it can be a large and sustainable local economic development opportunity.Current wind resource estimates (i.e. MN DOC) for the Lake Superior Coastal Zone indicate thatwe have a poor wind resource not suitable for development. These wind resource estimates arebased on climatological modeling, and are no substitute for site-specific measurements. Weessentially wanted to verify current wind resource estimates with site-specific monitoring, andexplore the economic viability of wind development in our region.The overall project was designed to achieve three primary objectives: 1. Obtain a minimum of one years worth of quality wind speed data from eight sites (Duluth, Clover Valley, Silver Bay,Finland, Lutsen, Grand Marais, Hovland and Grand Portage) along the Northshore of LakeSuperior; 2. Use this site-specific wind speed data to create a wind resource map for the entireregion to include several key overlays (topography, roads, transmission, bird migrations); 3. Usethis wind speed data to conduct community-scale wind development economic feasibilitystudies, and determine the direct, indirect and induced (employment) economic impactsassociated with potential future wind development in Southern St. Louis, Lake and Cook Counties.
Objective I: Wind MonitoringII. Methods
 A. Site Selection:
Our study began with the process of selecting appropriate sites for monitoring the wind. The keycriteria dictating site selection included the following: 1. We needed an existing structure thatcould be climbed and was at least 100 feet tall; 2. We were looking for monitoring sitesassociated with prominent peaks; 3. We needed year round road access to each site; 4. Weneeded a set of sites that were equally spaced along the Northshore; 5. We needed permission to
 
3have unlimited access to these sites; and finally 6. We needed a good community partner towork with. Fortunately, we were able to meet each these criteria at eight different sites fromDuluth to Grand Portage. Figure 1 illustrates the geographical location of each site. Table 1lists our monitoring sites, and describes several key characteristics of each.
Figure 1.
The geographic location of each monitoring site
 Table 1.
Key characteristics of each monitoring site.
Site Structure Elev (ft) Height (ft)
Enger Tower Tower 1146 95Clover Valley Fire Tower 1400 110Silver Bay Weather Stat 620 100Finland Fire Tower 1865 120Lutsen Com Tower 1745 120Grand Marais Com Tower 1722 100Hovland Fire Tower 1774 95Grand Portage Com Tower 1720 30m50m80m

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