Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Cook County Water Plan Initiatives (306-04-08)

Cook County Water Plan Initiatives (306-04-08)

Ratings: (0)|Views: 217 |Likes:
The Cook County Local Water Management plan outlines a number of goals, objectives and initiatives to protect and enhance water resources in Cook County. The plan calls for continued leadership in the area of water quality monitoring. This project provided funding to continue this water quality data collection and prioritize water bodies for sampling, provided outreach and education on septic systems, research into possible stormwater modeling tools, strategies to solve issues related to erosion on county roads and how to more effectively manage wetlands.

This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program. This project was also made possible by a grant provided by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Additional cash and staff contributions were provided by Cook County and the Soil and Water Conservation District.
The Cook County Local Water Management plan outlines a number of goals, objectives and initiatives to protect and enhance water resources in Cook County. The plan calls for continued leadership in the area of water quality monitoring. This project provided funding to continue this water quality data collection and prioritize water bodies for sampling, provided outreach and education on septic systems, research into possible stormwater modeling tools, strategies to solve issues related to erosion on county roads and how to more effectively manage wetlands.

This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program. This project was also made possible by a grant provided by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Additional cash and staff contributions were provided by Cook County and the Soil and Water Conservation District.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Minnesota's Lake Superior Coastal Program on Mar 09, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/13/2010

pdf

text

original

 
 
Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program
Cook County Water Plan Initiatives
 
Dave Stark – Cook County Soil and WaterConservation District -Water Plan CoordinatorDate of Completion: December 31, 2007Project No. 306-04-08Contract No. A92530
This project was funded in part under the Coastal Zone Management Act, byNOAA’s Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, incooperation with Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program. This projectwas also made possible by a grant provided by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Additional cash and staff contributions were providedby Cook County and the Soil and Water Conservation District.
Soil & Water Conservation District 
 
Cook County
 
 
2
Introduction
The Cook County Local Water Management plan outlines a number of goals, objectivesand initiatives to protect and enhance water resources in Cook County. The plan calls forcontinued leadership in the area of water quality monitoring. This project providedfunding to continue this water quality data collection and prioritize water bodies forsampling, provided outreach and education on septic systems, research into possiblestormwater modeling tools, strategies to solve issues related to erosion on county roadsand how to more effectively manage wetlands.
Work CompletedTask 1 – Lake Monitoring
The grant was initiated on September 15, 2006 and included water quality monitoringduring 2007 on the lakes identified above. Dave Stark coordinated the volunteers andoversaw all sampling activities. ERA Laboratories, Inc. was contracted to performlaboratory analyses on lake samples and provided the required bottles. Lake laboratoryanalyses were performed for total and ortho-phosphorous, pheophytin and chlorophyll-a.Samples were obtained utilizing an integrated sampler (0-2 meters) when depthpermitted; otherwise grab samples were taken. A hydro lab multi-meter was used torecord epilimnion and hypolimnion field parameters including temperature, depth, pH,specific conductivity and dissolved oxygen. Sampling occurred at six sites and included:1.
 
Agnes Lake (Lake ID16-359; 1 site -201)2.
 
Deeryard Lake (Lake ID 16-0253; 2 sites – 201, 202)3.
 
Ward (Lake ID 16-248; 1 site - 201)4.
 
Pike (Lake ID 16-0252; 2 sites – 101, 201)The laboratory analysis data has been transferred to the Minnesota Pollution ControlAgency (MPCA) Environmental Data Access (EDA) database and will be utilized foreducation and outreach at next summer’s lake association training events and meetings.An electronic copy of the results in the MPCA database format is included on theelectronic submittal for this report and a shortcut to this data exists in
Appendix A,Lakes Water Quality Monitoring Results.
 Citizen volunteers were contacted and provided training on sampling protocols similar tothe MPCA Citizen Lake Monitoring Plus (CLMP+) program. Information on thisprogram can be found at http://www.pca.state.mn.us/water/clmp.html Volunteers provided canoes for sampling activities. The volunteer monitors that participated in lakesampling included:
 
Kate and Steve Surbaugh (Pike Lake);
 
John Oberholtzer (Deeryard and Ward Lakes);
 
Agnes (Tristan Beaster).Monthly sampling occurred from May through September during the 2007 season.Cook County Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) staff attended the Caribou,and Hungry Jack lake association meetings in the summer of 2007. Information on waterquality and steps that landowners could take to improve lake management was shared.
 
 
3
Associated Water Quality (Education, Training and Monitoring Activities)
Dave Stark assisted the Cook County Coalition of Lake Association in organizing avolunteer lake monitoring training event for 8 participants on Poplar Lake. This trainingwas in addition to the individual training with the citizen monitors mentioned above. Ata previous lake association meeting, Dave had the good fortune of meeting Bob Carlson,an internationally renowned expert in limnology and Cook County summer resident. Bobattended the Poplar Lake training and provided information on detection limits andmethodology for sampling. RMBEL Laboratories was utilized for this sampling, whichwas not charged to the grant. Various lake associations started working with thislaboratory, due in part to their web based interface to Citizen Lake monitoring data andservices for submitting data to STORET. Information can be found athttp://www.rmbel.info Cook County currently partners with six organizations on water monitoring programs.These include the Cook County Planning and Zoning department, MPCA, the NaturalResources Research Institute (NRRI), the Flute Reed Partnership and the Cook CountyCoalition of Lake Associations (CCCOLA). Other significant monitoring beyond thisgrant included involvement with the MPCA Beach Monitoring Program and samplingassociated with the Poplar River TMDL study.
16.04
inland lake shoreline miles weremonitored for this grant.A prioritized list of lakes and streams in the Coastal Zone of Cook County are included in
Appendix B.
Various documents, plans and personal judgments were made in compilingthis list. These included, but were not limited to the Cook County Water ManagementPlan, the North Shore Loading Study, the Lake Superior Basin Plan, MPCA 303-d lists aswell as waters deemed to be “un-assessed” by the MPCA. The vast majority of samplingthat is required in Cook County is for the purposes of establishing baseline and trendwater quality information. In general, lakes should be monitored for chlorophyll a, totalphosphorous and secchi depth to establish a baseline. If additional concerns exist onlakes (i.e. failing septic systems) additional parameters could be added to bettercharacterize the system. Some of the general threats to water quality and some samplingparameters are listed below:
Septic System Impacts
-Phosphorous, Nitrogen, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity andBiological Oxygen Demand
Road Impacts –
Chloride, Turbidity, Total Suspended Solids
Runoff Impacts –
Phosphorous,
 
Total Suspended Solids, TurbidityField parameters of Temperature, Conductivity, Total Suspended Solids, Turbidity andDissolved Oxygen should be recorded.For streams the primary threats are related to runoff from developments, road buildingactivities and increased temperature due-to removal of trees in the riparian zones of rivers. Primary parameters include Turbidity, Total Suspended Solids, Temperature andChloride.This should not be considered an exhaustive list. It should be noted that each individualwater body would require a certain level of evaluation in terms of what scientific

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->