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Lessons From the Reformation by Alonzo T. Jones

Lessons From the Reformation by Alonzo T. Jones

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Published by Kunedog1
Lessons from the Reformation
Edited by www.maranathamedia.com

1. THE REFORMATION RENOUNCED
In the City of Chicago, III., Dec. 5, 1912, an assembly of three hundred and nineteen clerical delegates from thirty-one professedly Protestant denominations intentionally and expressly repudiated the word "Protestant." That is an occurrence that can never mean less than much every way. It will be found to mean much more, and in more ways, than was thought of by the three hundred and nineteen who did it.
Lessons from the Reformation
Edited by www.maranathamedia.com

1. THE REFORMATION RENOUNCED
In the City of Chicago, III., Dec. 5, 1912, an assembly of three hundred and nineteen clerical delegates from thirty-one professedly Protestant denominations intentionally and expressly repudiated the word "Protestant." That is an occurrence that can never mean less than much every way. It will be found to mean much more, and in more ways, than was thought of by the three hundred and nineteen who did it.

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Published by: Kunedog1 on Mar 11, 2010
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Lessons from the Reformation
 Edited by www.maranathamedia.com
1. THE REFORMATION RENOUNCED
In the City of Chicago, III., Dec. 5, 1912, an assembly of three hundred and nineteen clericaldelegates from thirty-one professedly Protestant denominations intentionally and expressly repudiatedthe word "Protestant."That is an occurrence that can never mean less than much every way. It will be found to meanmuch more, and in more ways, than was thought of by the three hundred and nineteen who did it. Andto the people of the United States it means the most of all.The assembly by which this meaningful thing was done, was the "Second Quadrennial Meetingof the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America." It was held in the Hotel La Salle,Chicago, Ill., Dec. 4-9, 1912, and was composed of three hundred and nineteen actually present and participating delegates.This "Federal Council" was then composed of thirty-one denominations, including all of themost prominent ones, having a total membership of "more than seventeen millions." It was originallyorganized by five hundred delegates from twenty denominations, who met for the purpose in CarnegieHall, New York City, Nov. 15-21, 1905.18In its original organization the "Federal Council of Churches" was expressly and distinctlyProtestant. In the call under which the convention met in New York City, the object of the proposedmeeting was distinctly stated to be "to secure an effective organization of the various Protestantcommunions of this country", and "to form a bond of union that will enable Protestantism to present asolid front," etc.And then, in only the second meeting of the Council as such, and without any issue or crisis todemand it, spontaneously and voluntarily this professedly Protestant organization repudiated the word"Protestant" that gave them an existence as a Federal Council, that gave them an existence asdenominations, and that gave them existence even as Christians! And this was done in the very first business session of the Council, and in dealing with the very first "Report" that was made to theCouncil: that is, at the first possible opportunity.The occasion for it was this: The "Executive Committee" presented its report. In that report thecommittee expressed the "earnest hope that the Second Federal Council will make yet more clear certain fundamental facts as to the churches of the country, through their federation." And the first of these was --"The fact of the substantial unity of the Christian and Protestant Churches of the nation."
 
No sooner was opened the discussion of the report than that word "Protestant" was challengedas if it were a mortal enemy that had invaded the Council."Why emphasize a word that is not a uniting but a dividing word? a word that recalls a mostunhappy and trying experience," said one.19"By using this word, you make it more difficult for many of your Christian brethren to work with you," said another.Discussion was soon cut off by a motion to resubmit the report for revision, eliminating theword "Protestant." And this was done thus: --"To express the fellowship and catholic unity of the Christian Church."Then the report was promptly adopted, and with applause.All the circumstances of this action of the Council plainly show that there was a full andwaiting readiness to do it. Indeed, preceding facts prove that all that was really new or sudden about itwas the actual doing of it at the first possible opportunity.1. In a "Moral and Religious Conference" held at Colorado Springs in May, 1908, in theopening address, there were spoken the following words: --"Once the church embraced all human activity. It was a great social structure. Then Luther  proclaimed his doctrine of individual responsibility, and the social structure disintegrated.Individualism in the church produced individualism in economic relations and in the State."But there is coming rapidly a change. The Christian Church must recognize this movement and be the leader in it."That was not officially a conference of the Church Federation; but prominent men were of itwho in 1905 had aided in the formation of the Federal Council. And that it is strictly indicative of thespirit of the Council itself, is confirmed in the next item.2. In December, 1908, at Philadelphia, Pa., in the first meeting of the Federal Council as such,the "right of private judgment" that was "emphasized," and the20Individuality" that was "developed in a notable manner," by the Protestant Reformation," wasspecifically abandoned as that which should "no longer blind the minds of believers to the need of combination and of mutuality in service."The right of private judgment in religion, and the principle of individual responsibility to God,are two essentials of the Protestant Reformation. Without these there never would -- there never could -- have been any Reformation. But these are not only essentials of the Protestant Reformation. They areessentials of Christianity itself.
 
 And yet in the keynote speech of the first meeting of the Federal Council that was ever held, thedeclaration was made and published as the standing word of the Council that these essentials of thereformation and of Christianity should "no longer blind the minds of believers."When the first meeting of the Council could publish such a statement as that, it is perfectlylogical that the second meeting should eliminate altogether the word "Protestant" as in any way properly attaching to that organization.3. In the public announcement of the date and place of holding that meeting in Chicago, it was plainly stated that this "United Protestantism is not to be construed as a demonstration against theRoman Catholic Church."When anything bearing the name "Protestant" is not even to be construed as a demonstrationagainst the Roman Catholic Church, then that thing is not Protestant at all; and of course in honestyshould no longer bear the title.Accordingly when that open statement had been most widely made in behalf of the Council,again it21was perfectly logical as well as only consistent that the Council should formally renounce the title of "Protestant."4. The Roman Church as represented or manifested in her Councils, especially in the Council of  Nice, was openly the aspiration of this Council.In his speech at the opening of the Council, the outgoing president said that by this assembly hewas caused to --"think of the Council of Nice -- the first General Council of the Christian Church. This Councilhas almost the exact number that composed the Council of Nice. The history of the Church is largelytold in her great Councils."And when the number of the delegates who actually were present and officially acting in theCouncil was made up and announced as "three hundred and nineteen," the statement was accompaniedwith the remark, "Just one more than the Council of Nice."Yes, the history of the Roman Church is largely told in her great Councils. And beyond allquestion her conspicuously great Councils were those of Nice, Constantinople, Ephesus, Chalcedon,Second of Nice, Trent, and the Vatican.In brief the story of these "great Councils" is this:The net result of the first four was to put the dead formulas of human creed in the place of theliving Word of God; a woman in the place of Christ; and a man in the place of God.

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