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Kintyre Club - 1825 to 1981

Kintyre Club - 1825 to 1981

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Published by Kintyre On Record
The Kintyre Club, formed in 1825, with objectives and functions which were appropriate at that period and well into the present century, was wound up in the year 1981, the club, throughout its history, dispensing welfare and educational aid without discrimination to all who deserved it.

The twelve gentlemen who started the club were all Glasgow "merchants" with Campbeltown origins, probably all of Lowland stock and the club's early activities were probably biased accordingly. Soon membership extended to the lairds and other men of standing in Kintyre (from Tarbert to Southend) and later to Kintyreans overseas.
The Kintyre Club, formed in 1825, with objectives and functions which were appropriate at that period and well into the present century, was wound up in the year 1981, the club, throughout its history, dispensing welfare and educational aid without discrimination to all who deserved it.

The twelve gentlemen who started the club were all Glasgow "merchants" with Campbeltown origins, probably all of Lowland stock and the club's early activities were probably biased accordingly. Soon membership extended to the lairds and other men of standing in Kintyre (from Tarbert to Southend) and later to Kintyreans overseas.

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Published by: Kintyre On Record on Mar 11, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/25/2013

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KINTYRE AND THE KINTYRE CLUB
HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PENINSULAWITH LISTS OF THE MEMBERS AND THE LADY ASSOCIATES OF THE CLUB1825 - 1833GLASGOW1884
 The Kintyre Club, formed in 1825, with objectives and functions which were appropriate atthat period and well into the present century, was wound up in the year 1981, the club,throughout its history, dispensing welfare and educational aid without discrimination to allwho deserved it. The twelve gentlemen who started the club were all Glasgow "merchants" with Campbeltownorigins, probably all of Lowland stock and the club's early activities were probably biased1
 
accordingly. Soon membership extended to the lairds and other men of standing in Kintyre(from Tarbert to Southend) and later to Kintyreans overseas. The members' roll contained at least 2,000 names and many Campbeltonians could identifytheir forebears, or at leastrecognise the association of many names on the roll. Unfortunately neither the rolls nor theclub records contain detailed information about the members and many of the familiesrepresented in the lists have now disappeared from Kintyre. The club membership reflected not only the many business connections between Glasgow andCampbeltown but also the far flung influence of Kintyre in the 19th century in The Dominions,America, India and other overseas territories, some curiosity surrounding one, ErnestDupertre of Aux Cayes, Haiti, who became an honorary member in 1859. The affairs of the club were well documented and amongst the most widely distributed of theclub's documents was a hard-backed 66-page booklet entitled "Kintyre and The Kintyre Club2
 
1884" which, until at least recent time, could be found on the shelves of Campbeltown'slibrary and some of what follows based on its contents. The official record states that "At a Meeting held, by special invitation, at the house of JohnCampbell, Esq., in Glasgow, on Friday 1st July 1825 .... a motion was made that a Club,consisting of the gentlemen now present (there were twelve) and such other gentlemen asmay be deemed eligible members, should be formed under the title and designation of "TheKintyre Club ... " The motion was carried and this meeting was considered to be the firstmeeting of The "Kintyre Club." The "open and avowed objects of the club was declared to be "social and rational enjoyment of the Members, in union with the relief and support of decayed and indigent individuals orfamilies resident in this neighbourhood (i.e. Glasgow), who have been either born or are thedescendants of parents born in the district from which the club takes its title."From this original resolution the club was properly constituted with its formal rules andregulations, and these remained substantially the same throughout the life of the club. In theamended rules of 1879 the object of the club was "for social and charitable purposes"; inthose of 1883 "for social, charitable and educational purposes" and in an amendment of 1927"for charitable and educational purposes".Originally there was an entry fee and an annual subscription, but this was consolidated to asingle life membership fee which remained at £3 3 shillings for Ordinary Members for most of the life of the club. There were also Honorary Members, who paid £2 2 shillings for this privilege: These includedLord Provosts of Glasgow, M.P.'s and distinguished business men and others who had Kintyrecontacts, but not family ties, the club instituting a "Lady Associate Branch" (fee 10 shillingsand 6 pence) in 1883 and the ladies admitted to full membership in 1927.From its beginning the club was under the patronage of the incumbent Duke of Argyll and,throughout her long life, H.R.H. Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, was patroness of the"Lady Associate Branch", the club's presidents elected annually from notable members of theclub resident either in Glasgow or Campbeltown. The affairs of the club were run by a committee of directors with a secretary and treasurer,these, who did most of the work, paid a small honorarium.A special feature of The Kintyre Club in its heyday were the "corresponding directors" electedfrom members resident in local communities outside Glasgow and Campbeltown, and in themain overseas territories, their function being to keep contact between the club and itsmembers in the areas concerned, the appointment of these 'corresponding directors'discontinued during WWI and, after WWII, certain other rules and usages regarding officebearers amended.Being run mainly by business men, the club's funds were strictly organised and carefullymanaged. The club had no premises and no permanent staff and its social activities weremade to pay for themselves so that its funds were practically all available for its charitableobjectives and for investment, the annual 'abstracts of accounts" providing very lucidstatements of the club's financial operations and, starting life as a social and charitable club,the club, over the years, becoming purely a charitable organisation.3

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