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Celebrating Lake Superior Science (306-star07-08)

Celebrating Lake Superior Science (306-star07-08)

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Those of us living along the shore of Superior have a unique relationship with the Lake and its basin. The stark beauty and wild character we treasure are also indicators of the fragility of this still relatively-pristine resource. Faced with increased development and forest fragmentation, climate warming, and invasive species, native plants and animals in the Lake Superior basin are under increased pressures. This project was initiated to increase awareness, understanding, and commitment to protecting these resources by bringing Lake Superior science into the Duluth community in a highly engaging way.
Those of us living along the shore of Superior have a unique relationship with the Lake and its basin. The stark beauty and wild character we treasure are also indicators of the fragility of this still relatively-pristine resource. Faced with increased development and forest fragmentation, climate warming, and invasive species, native plants and animals in the Lake Superior basin are under increased pressures. This project was initiated to increase awareness, understanding, and commitment to protecting these resources by bringing Lake Superior science into the Duluth community in a highly engaging way.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Minnesota's Lake Superior Coastal Program on Mar 13, 2010
Copyright:Public Domain

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03/13/2010

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The University of Minnesota Duluth Presents:
Family Night With Wolves and Moose
Wednesday, November 5, 7:30-8:30pm • Hartley Nature Center
Ê
The Duluth Premier of “Fortunate Wilderness”
With Filmmaker George Desort
Ê
Thursday, November 6, 7-8:30pm • UMD’s Marshall Performing Arts Center
Ê
American Indian Environmental Ethics Meets Wolf-Moose Research
With Wilderness Scholar Dr. Michael Nelson
Ê
Friday, November 7, 12:00-1:00pm • 4th Floor Rotunda, UMD Library
Ê
50 Years of Wolf/Moose Research
With Biologists Dr. Rolf Peterson and Dr. John Vucetich
Ê
Friday, November 7, 7-8:30pm • UMD’s Marshall Performing Arts Center
Ê
For more information about these events and more, go to
•Swenson College of Science and Engineering •Isle Royale Institute•Natural Resources Research Institute •Minnesota Sea Grant•College of Education and Human Service Professions •Center for Environmental Education•Recreational Sports Outdoor Program •VIZ Lab
This project was unded in part by the Coastal ZoneManagement Act, by NOAA’s Ofce o Ocean andCoastal Resource Management, in cooperation withMinnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program.
UMD is an equal opportunity educator and employer.
 
 
Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Program
Celebrating Lake Superior Science 
Tom Beery
Center for Environmental Education
University of Minnesota Duluth
12/19/08
Project No. 306-STAR07-08
Contract No. B18558
Acknowledgements:This project was funded in part under the Coastal ZoneManagement Act, by NOAA’s Office of Ocean and CoastalResource Management, in cooperation with Minnesota’s LakeSuperior Coastal Program.
Other project support was provided by the following organizations:University of Minnesota Duluth: Recreation Sports Outdoor Program,Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation,Department of Education, Biology Department, College of Educationand Human Service Professions, Swenson College of Science andEngineering, School of Fine Arts, Viz Lab; Hartley Nature Center,University of Minnesota Extension Sea Grant, Isle Royale NationalPark, COSEE-Great Lakes project, Michigan Technological University
 
 
Introduction
Those of us living along the shore of Superior have a unique relationship with theLake and its basin. The stark beauty and wild character we treasure are alsoindicators of the fragility of this still relatively-pristine resource. Faced withincreased development and forest fragmentation, climate warming, and invasivespecies, native plants and animals in the Lake Superior basin are underincreased pressures. This project was initiated to increase awareness,understanding, and commitment to protecting these resources by bringing LakeSuperior science into the Duluth community in a highly engaging way. Nospecies are more charismatic or more emblamatic of the region than wolves andmoose, thus the informative celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the IsleRoyale Wolf Moose Studies.2008 marks the 50th year of the Isle Royale wolf-moose research project. Theresearch, initiated by Dr. Durward Allen in 1958 and currently under thestewardship of Drs. Rolf Peterson and John Vucetich, is the world's longestuninterrupted predator-prey study. The world's scientific community looks to thisstudy both to better understand a dynamic large mammal predator-preyrelationship and as exemplary long-term ecological research. Asked by theNational Park Service how he would like to observe the 50th anniversary of thiswork, Dr. Peterson replied that educating teachers and the public were hishighest priority. Thus, the 50th Anniversary has developed into a year longeducational outreach program. Events have been planned throughout the US toshare the findings of the study with a wide variety of audiences. This proposalfulfills the core goal behind Dr. Peterson's request to the National Park Service,i.e., getting the story of the wolf-moose research out to the public in an effort toincrease scientific and ecological literacy.The Minnesota coast is inexorably tied to Isle Royale. Movements of certainanimal populations came from the Northern shores, indigenous people came andwent from the island via the northern shoreline, and the rich cultural history ofcommercial fishing on Isle Royale is largely a Minnesota story. The coastalcommunities of Northeast Minnesota have shared and continue to share a lakeand a lifestyle with the great island since Lake Superior emerged out of the ice!In addition, on-going interest in wolf populations and current focus on changes inmoose populations in Northeast Minnesota make the science of the Isle Royalestudies highly relevant to NE Minnesota audiences. Given Duluth’s connection toLake Superior and Isle Royale, the 50 years of wolf-moose research wasdeemed a topic of importance for this community; the community responseconfirmed this idea.

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