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DMSCO Log Book Vol.8 6/1930-5/1931

DMSCO Log Book Vol.8 6/1930-5/1931

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01/23/2014

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Entered
as
second
class
matter,February
3rd,
1923,
at
thepost
office
at
DesMoines,
Iowa,
undertheact
of
August
24th,
1912.
LOG
THE
BOOK
Acceptance
formailing
at
special
rates
of
postage
provided
for
in
Section
1103
Act
of
October
3rd,
1917,
authorized
Feb.
3rd,
1923.
PUBLISHED
SEMI-MONTHLY
BY
THE
DESMOINESSTILLCOLLEGEOFOSTEOPATHY
Volume
8
JUNE
15,
1930
Number
1
Publicity
I
have
just
returned
from
a
six
thousand
mile
trip
overthe
Western
Circuit,and
the
monthprevious
to
that,
made
a
trip
to
San
Antonio,
Texas,to
meetwith
thestate
convention
there.
In
both
of
these
trips
the
publicity
was
wonderful.
We
often
hearcomplaintsmadefromdifferentsections
of
thecountry
on
this
very
subject,but
it
ismyopin-ion
that
thething
was
not
prop-
erly
handled
from
the
beginning.Take
the
Texas
meeting,
for
instance.While
I
was
there
onlytwodays,
I
met
personallythreereporters
and
not
only
talked
to
themaboutthewrite-up,butthey
wereallsold
on
the
Osteo-
pathic
ideaandwhile
I
was
not
surprised
to
learn
it,
I
found
out
that
many
of
the
boyson
thepaperstake
treatments
regularly.
Those
of
youwho
are
treating
patients
associated
withthe
newspapers
should
take
advan-
tage
of
this
contact
tosee
that
Osteopathygets
its
part
of
the
publicity
that
is
being
givento
the
fieldof
therapy.
We
had
191
inches
of
spacein
thepapers
in
the
South
at
thetime
of
the
Tex-
asConvention.
Drs.
PeckandPeck
handled
it
and
they
were
on
the
job.
It
takes
one
person'stime
to
do
a
thing
of
thissort
right.
Personal
contacts
must
be
madeand
the
stuff
ready
in
part
forthe
boyson
the
papers.At
Coronado,Calif.
the
news-
paperscarried
everything.
TheSan
Diego
papersweregenerous.
They
carriedpictures
andspecial
articlesabouteverything
on
the
program
and
the
whole
thing
was
handled
well.
Theconvention
at
Salem,
Ore.
was
notlargebutthepapers
used
pictures
andwere
free with
space,
too.
AtSpokane,Washing-ton,
we
hadeverything.Three
reporters
were
on
the
job
at
the
convention
almost
all
the
timeandseveralspecial
photographs
were
taken
that
appeared,
in
the
localpapers.
Another
feature
that
wasa
wonderful
servicewas
that
an
AP
man
was
there
every
dayand
sentitemsout
overhiswire
to
the
papers
all
over
the
Tri-State
region.
May
I
addhere
that
theground
had
been
pre-
paredand
all
of
these
reporters
were
already
soldon
the
Osteo-
pathic
principle.
I
had
personalinterviewswithall
of
them
and
they
can
talk
Osteopathy
better
than
someof
ourpracticing
phy-sicians.
It
wasa
realdelight
to
talk
with
the
boys
and
one
of
thegirls
who
were
on
the
job
at
Spokane.
Thispromises
well
forthe
con-
(Continued
on
page
3)
Western
Conventions
Three
Seniors
Go
To
Big
Success
Detroit
Dr.
H.
V.
Halladay
has
re-
Three
members
of
the
senior
turned
from
a
tour
of
the
West-
class
just
graduated
from
Des
ern
OsteopathicCircuit,which
Moines
Still
College,
have
been
includedconventionsin
Corono-
selectedas
internes
at
the
De-
da,Calif.,Salem,
Ore.,
Spokane,
troit
Osteopathic
Hospital
at
Wash.,
SaltLake
City,
Utah
and
Detroit,
Mich.
Colorado
Springs,
Colo.
He
re-Beginning
July
1st,
Drs.
My-
ports
excellentmeetings
at
allron
Monger,
HarrySkinner
andplacesand
we
regret
very
much
NormanWeirwill
enter
the
that
we
have
so
little
roomfor
above
mentioned
hospitalfor
one
a
report.year's
interne
work.Wordhas
just
been
received
Sigma
Sigma
Phi
Hold
that
Dr.
Sherman
Meyeropened
his
office
at
Emmetsburg,Pa.,
Banquet
For
Grads
June
5th.
To
these
doctors
we
extend
our
h
ea.rti
est. cong
ra.tulaltions
and
wish
them
success.
Assembly,
May
23,
1930
Thisbeing Senior
Day,
the
en-
tire
senior
classwas
seated
upon
the
stage.
We
are
compelled
to
The
semi-annual
Sigma
Sigma
say
that
they
were
a
very
fine
Phi banquet
in
honor
of
gradu-
looking
group
and
we
regret
very
ating
members
was
held
at
much
that
this
will
be
their
last
Younkers
banquet
room,Tues-
appearance
as
students
in
our
dayevening,
May
20th,
at
6:00
midst
at
assembly.
o'clock
p.
m.
After
two
numbers
by
the
Avc pb ew s
band,
Dr.Schw
artz
presented
A
very
pleasingbanquet
was
the
special
awards
given
by
the
served,
after
which
each
grad-
school,aswellas
Sigma
Sigma
uating
membermade
a few
re-Phi.The
school
awards
were
as
marks.
Several
fieldmen
werefollows:
For
800
treatments
or
present
and
we
were
very
much
more,
the
following
men
were
inspired
by
their
encouraging
awarded,NormanWeir,Norman
remarks.
Welch,
Harry
Skinner,ShermanPresident
Gill
was
elected
asMeyer
andVictorReeder.
The
fraternity
representative
at
the
awards
givenby
the
Obstetrics
National
Convention
at
Philadel-Department
werereceived
by
phiathis
summer.Benton
Kinter,
Norman
Welch
The
annualbanquet
of
the
and
Owen
Taylor.The
Pediatric
Grand
Chapter
willbe
held
at
DepartmentawardedShermantheArcadia
Cafe
in
Philadelphia
Meyer.
The
anatomyawards
on
July
9,
at
12:30
p.
m.
were
givento
Ernest
Faus,
Rob-
Wehope
allmembers
attend-
ert
Herrick
and
Ralph
Lang.
ing
the
convention
will
lunch
The medal
offeredby Dr.Mar-
with
us
at
that
o
tiome.i
shall
each
semester
was
awarded
with
us
at
that
time.toWilliamClark.The
awards
offeredbySigma
A
Good
Opportunity
Sigma
Phifor
proficiency
andservicewere
wonby
ShermanWordhas
just
been
received
Meyer
and
Owen
Taylor,respect-
that
F.
Frazer,
Box543,
Escon-ively.dido,Calif.,
wants
to
sellhisTheSigmaSigma
Phi
athletic
practice.
'awards
were
presented
by
NickGill,
president
of
the
organiza-
Mr.
Frazer
has
practiced
in
tion.Thebaseball
trophy
going
San
Diego
for
fifteen
years
and
to
theIota
TauSigma
fraternity
1
in
Escondido
forthepast
fifteenand
the
golf
cup
to
the
Atlas{
years.Henow
has
a
fine
practice
Club asa
permanent
possession,
but
he
is
75
years
old
and
wants
the
Atlas
Club
having
won
the
to
retire,
that
being
the
only
cup
for
two
consecutiveyears.
t
reasonhe
wouldconsidersellingSeveralnovelty
numbers
were
f
at
so
lowa
figure-only
$600.00
presented
by
an
instrumental
Cash-no
terms.trio,
one
of
which
wasour
Joe
t
Mr.
Frazer
alsohas
a
fine
six Devine,who
hasgainedmuch
<
room
housein
a
good
location,
popularity
as
a
banjo
artist
thru-
which
is
fullyfurnished.
out
the
city.
E
This
offer
requiresimmediate
Ourlocal
Jean
Austin,
in
thes
action.
(Continued
on
nDae
3)
Commencement
Program
On
May
29,
1930,
forty-onemen
and
one
womanwere
grad-uatedfrom
Des
Moines
Still
Col-
legeof
Osteopathy.
The
very
unique
commence-
mentprogram
was
held
in
the
auditorium
of
Hoyt
Sherman
place.
The
graduating
membersmarched
from
the
rear
lobby,
via
thecenter
aisle,
the
march
being
played
by
Miss
Marguerite
Kahl.
Afterthe
classwas
seated
up-
on
thestage,
Dr.
M.
E.
Bachman
gave
the
invocation.
Immediately
following
the
invocation,
Mr.
Tom
Weatherwaxrendered
twovocal
numbers,
"Bedouin
LoveSong"
and"Macushla".
Dr.
Johnsonthenpresented
Rev.
Arthur
A.
Brooks,
pastor
of Grace
M.
E.
Church
ofDesMoines,who
delivered
the
Com-
mencementaddress.
In
his
ex-
cellentaddress
Rev.
Brooks
broughtout
andemphasizedmany
of
the
interesting
points
concerning
the
history
and
de-
velopment
of
Osteopathy.
Rev.
Brooks
having
had
a
personalacquaintancewith
Dr.
Stilland
the
members
ofhis
family,
made
theaddress
even
more
interest-
ing.
After
the
address,
Mr.Tom
Weatherwaxpresented
three
more
vocal
numbers,
"I
Want
to
be
Ready","Run,
Mary,
Run"
and
"A
Tragic
Tale".
He
was
accompanied
by
Miss
Kahl
at
the
piano.
Dr.
Swartznext
presented
thegraduating
members
to Dr.
John-
son,who
conferredthe
degreeDoctor
of
Osteopathy
on
the
fol-
lowing:Susan
B.
Bruder,
William
W.
Clark,
John
E.
Cochran,Joseph(Continued
on
page
3)
Square
&
Compass
Hold
Final
Banquet
ofYear
On
Saturdaynight,
May
24th,
the
StillSquare
of
Square&
Compass
held
their
honorary
senior
banquet
at
the
Nanking
Cafe.
As
this
was
the
fourth
orfifthbanquet
of
the
week
for
many
of
oursenior
members,
they
were
excused
from
their
custom-
ary
remarks
andwereallowed
to
sit
backand
listen
to
a
veryine
after-dinner
speechbyRev.
James
Brett
Kenna,
pastor
at
the
First
M.
E.
Church
of
this
city.
We
are
very
proud
of
ourgraduatingmembers
and
feel
sure
that
they
willall
be
suc-
;essful
Osteopathicphysicians.
_--Jr _
 
2TL
B
I'AA-TrrflAJI-rV
AlAT
operationwith
Dr.
Lydje,-
for-A
CkPUTERITY
Ote
s
merly
of
Dayton,
Ohio,
in
a
hos-
V
-
I
"
;+nl1n
ATi4l-nin.
;I
-
---
tI
 
)i 4LUV 11561iL6.
V;,,
.
Over
the
end
of/
the
-
month
there
was
of
course
a
rush
and
~s
bustle
as
the
boys
separated
ties,
o
socks,
etc.,
and
packed
up
to
1
leave.
We
shall
be
glad
to
heari
fromthem andfrom
field
mem-
a
bers
during
thesummermonths
8
and
we
extend
a
cordial
welcome-
f
to
all andhopethey
will dropin-and
see
us
if
they arein
the
i
ATLAS
CLUB
neighborhood
ofDes
Moines.
s
With
thepassing
of
the
schoolBro.
Gill
has
been
selected
to
e
year
the
househas
been
emptied
represent
us
at
GrandChapter
of
all
but
afew.Bobby
Homan,meeting
during
the
coming
con-t
JoeWynn,KenWard,and
Larry
ventionin
Philadelphia.t
Boatman
arestaying
on,
but
at
Bro.
Kinter
has
just
returned
c
best
the
old
house
still
seems
fromLewistown,
Mont.,
where
"like
home,
when
mother's
he
has
been
visiting
Dr.
Curran.
away".
Bennywill
return
to
Lewistown
To
the list
of
those
who
came,
about
Sept 1st to
take
over
the
saw
andwereconquered,
we
addObstetrics,
Pediatrics
andProc-
the
names
of
Don
Hughes,Duketology
departments
of
Dr.Cur-
Wireand
Cris
Fedson.
May
we
ran's
practice.extend
our
sincere
regardsfor
The
boyswho
are
staying
over
the
future
happiness
of
theseare
busy
atthe
college
this
sum-
E
Brothers.
merwithdissection,
0.
B.
and
It
was
with
a
great
deal
of
treating
patients.
Dissection
will
pleasure
that
we
welcomedBro.
be
over
the
18th,
after
which
the
pleasure
that
we
welcomedBro
deserted.House
of
the
Kirksvillechapter
house
willbe
almost
deserted.
as
ourguestduring
the
past
Bro
L
A.
Nowtkins
practiceat
State--Board
examinations.
-take
over
Dr.
Atkinspractice
at
iState
Boardexaminations
.
We
extendan
invitation
to
all
Boone,Iwa,
for
the
summer.
Brothers
f
otherchapters
pass-
Bro.
Raymond
Kaleand
Miss
1
B
rothers
of
other
ity
toeris
i t e
K
athryn
Perry
w
ere
m
arried
last
I
ing
throughthe
city
to
visitthe
Tuesday-night
at
the
First
M.
E.
I
house,and
we
pledge
our
heart-esday
night
at
this
ity.The
Chapteriest
welcome.
Church
of
this
city.
TheChapter
Bro.
John
Andersonwillactextends
to
them
heartiest
con-
as official
representative
of
Xip-
gratula
tions.n
hoid
Chapter
atthe
meeting
of
Dr.
Kale
is
practicingin
Des
the
Grand
Chapter
in
Philadel-
Moines
being
located
in
thephiaduringthe National
Con-
Kraft
buildng.
vention.
PHI
SIGMA
GAMMA
The
annual
Atlas
Club
ban-
PHI
SIGMA
GAMMA
quet
will
be
held
at
the
Belle-
Bros.
Grau,
Stritmatter,
Parks
view
Stratford
Hotelin
Philadel-
and
Reeves
re holding
down
he
phia
on
Wednesday,
July
9that
jobs
as
custodiansforthe
sum-
8:00
p.
m.
We
hope
that
all
the
mer.
Dropus
a
line
and
let
us
Brothers
who
attendthe
conven-know
how
you
are
going.
tion
will
make
a
special
effort
Letters
werereceived
from
tion
will
make
a
specialeffort
Red
Stewart
and Hen
Scatterday.
to
be
at
thebanquet,
as
we
are
Red
Stewart
and
en
Scatterday.positive
everyonewillhave
a
Both
boysseem
contented.
lgreat
ime.
'Dave
Grau
is
having
a
big
Word
has
beenreceived
fromtimeamusing
the
dancers
ofDes
W^ordhas
been
eceivedfrom
se,ae.
Bros.Ken
Moore
and
Harry
Tay-
Moines.Nice
new
sax,
Dave.
lor.
Kensays
hewas
welcomed
Jim
Parks
manages
to
bring
home
by
the Warrenbrass
band
after
makinganextensive
tour
ow
they
do
disappear.
Dick
Stritmatter
is
kept
busy
of
Wisconsin,
Michigan
and
sev-
of
WisconsiMchigana
between
the
bookstore and
0.
B.
eralotherforeigncountries.Harrywrites
that
he
is
verybusy
cases,
More
power.
makingpractice
greens
so
the
Dixie
Reeves
is
back
at
the
golfers
of
St.
Paul
may improve
ld
drug
so
or
he
summer.
Between
.
B.
calls
andworking
their
game;
______
__.
nights,
he
gets
a
little
sleep.He's
IOTA
AUI
SIGMA
:tryingto
break
Dick's
freshmanendurance
record.
Once
again
we're
backin
the he
b
oys
ishto
than
k
you
sunshine
of
summervacation.
for
the
wayyou
leftthe
houseThe
Brothers
have
spread
to
and
assure
you
thatit
will
await
their
respective
homes
invarious
ou
r
coming
this
fall-as
is!
parts
of
thecountry.
We,
the
few
who
areleft
to
take
care
of
the
house,wish
them
success
for
Aching
Feet
their
plansduring
the
summermonths.
It
is
with
great
pleasure
that
We
extend
ourcongratulations
we
print
the
followingclipping.toall
of
the
graduates
and
hope
Dr.
Rickenbacker
was
graduated
to
hear
of
orfrom
them
as
they
from
DesMoines
Still
College
in
prove
to
the
world
that
they
are
thespring
of
1929:
verycapableDoctors.Themisery
of
aching
feet
of-
We
werevery
pleasantly
sur-
ten
extendssome
distance
from
prised
by
a
visit
fromDr.Sten-
its
source.Theyspoil
many
ainger
over
the
first
of
the
month.
good
disposition.ThecauseandHeannouncedhis
intention
of
treatment
of
aching
feet
was
thepracticing
inIowa.
maintopic
at the
March
meeting
Bro.
Wigal
is
workingin
co-
of
the
KingCountyOsteopathic
Lssociation,
held
at
the
Dolly
ladison
Tea Room,
Thursday
he
thirteenth.
:
-
Dr.Rickenbacker,who
has
tudied
withDr.
John
M.
Hiss
Af
Columbus,
Ohio,
America'seadingfootspecialist,
was
thenstructor.
Hegave
very
thoro
and
practical
instruction
on
the
adjustment
of
thebones
of
the
eetandthe
strengthening
of
irches,in
a
clearandlucid
man-ier
that
was
very
easily
under-
Atood
andgrasped
by
thosepres-
ent.
Thedoctor
also
demonstra-
ted
animproved
technique
for
the
reduction
of
dislocated
car-tilages
of
the
knee
joints.
Dr.
Rickenbackerhasrecently
1
o-
cated
in
Seattleand
is
a
valu-
able
addition
to
the
osteopathic
profession
of
that
city.
The
Ego
and
Its
Mate
Ava
L.
Johnson
The
baldly physiological
ex-
planation
of
the
psychicandemotional
activitiesrelatedwith
sex
portrays
energy
gathering
about
the
individual
sex
pattern
(nervous,mental,
muscular
andchemical);collecting
to
the
point
of
overflowing
and
beingreleased.The
release,whatever
form
it
takes,
affords
release
from
tensionand
therefore
com-
fort.
A
jealousrage
is
one
outlet
for
suchengorgedenergy.En-
ergy
has
unquestionably
been
ex-
pended
in
this
circumstance.
The
close
relationship
between
cer-
tain
religious
hysteria
andre-
lease
of
energyfrom
around
the
sexual
core
or
pattern
of
reac-tionhas
been
scientifically
es-
tablished.
And
certainly
energy
in
no
small
amount
is
released
in
suchan
orgy.
Thehumanorganism
is
so
constituted
that
the
press
of
en-
vironment,
sounds,
light,
food,
clothing,
music,
excitement,reg-
ister
in
hismake-up
by
generat-
ing anenergy(possiblyelectric-ity,
certainly
something
similar)
which
finds
its
most
strikinglysatisfactory
outlet
incompanion-ship
with
one
of
theopposite
sex.
Butthe
onewho
assumes
that
such
outlet
is
limitedtophysicalintimacies,
is
stultifying
lifeand
stunting
hisgrowthand
outlook.Flaming
Youth
Misses
Biggest
Thrill
To
maintain
that
the
dynamicforce
irretrievably
drawing
two
humanstogether,
tremendous
power
thoughit
is,
constitute
all
there
is
to
human
sex
life
is
to
maintain
that
h
e
wiry,
flimsy,
utilitarian
rootsareall
there
is
to
the
oak. Experience,
observa-
tion
and
study
show
that
sex
en-
ergy
entersinto
colors,
and
ergy
entersinto
colors,and
makes
delightful
everyform
of
estheticappreciation
of
life.
The
charmingperson
on
the
one
hand
abounding
in
the
"joiedevivre"
in
that
spirit
of
interest
in
all
things,delight
in
many
is
nol
onewhose
sex
energiesar(
cramped,
denied,
or
vilified
as
£
viciousimpulse
to
be
bound
anc
cast into.chains
as
a
meanst(
strength
of
character.
Neither
on
the
other
hand,and
this
is
ai
(Continued
on
page
3)
Sixty-sixDrugs
Used
!
When
the
first
college
of
oste-opathywas
established,
we
did
not
"believe
in"
materia
medica,
pharmacology,surgeons,special-
ists,
etc.,etc.
Yet,
in
thegreat
book of
whatis to
beit
was
written
that
37
years
later
we
wouldhave eight
colleges
of
osteopathy
and
seven
of
them
would
be
teaching
mate-
ria
medica
and pharmacology.
One
of
themhas
been
teach-ing
these
branches
for
15
or
16
years,but
through
lack
of
adver-
tising
few
of
the
profession haveknown
of
it.
Properly
adver-tised,
this
schoolwouldnow
be
the oldest
and
best
attended
os-
teopathic
school.
If
the
Old
Doc-
tor
couldpay
our
schools
andconventions
a
flying
visit,great
wouldbe
his
surprise.
Yet,
we
mustadmit,times
change.The
last
generation
has
shown
the
greatest
progress
evermade in
asimilar
period
since
the
begin-ning
of
time.
Today
osteopathy
is
osteop-
athy,surgery,
andmedicine.
Yet,
today,
as
yesterday,
you
have
your
choice
as
to
what
you
are
to
practice,andif
you
can
cureallailments
by
manipula-tion
that
is
your
right,
just
as
it
willalwaysbe
your
right.
If yourcompetitor
wishes
to
take
special
coursesandbranchout
a
bit,
surely
that
is
his
right.
Los
AngelesCounty
is
the
os-
teopathic
center
of
the
world,with
itsgreat hospitals,sanita-
riumsand
institutions.
Two
osteopathichospitals
val-
ued
at
$600,000
and
one
milliondollarsrespectively,andunderthesamemanagement,
usesixty-
six
drugsin
each
institution.
The
drugs
haveall
been
passedupon
by
the
physiciansoperat-ingthese
hospitals,
andhave
been
found
to
be
necessary.
Most
of
them,
to
be
sure,
are
used
in
connectionwithsurgery.Thechancesare
the
same
drugs
or
similardrugs
are
in
daily use
in ALL
of
our
osteo-
pathichospitals.
Now
would
you
care
to
refer
patients
to
a
hospi-
tal
that
didnot- usedrugs?
Two
Bostonosteopaths,
Mac-
Donaldand
McWilliams,
treat
the
cervical
column
ONLY.
Al-
though
inin
rare
instances
they
do
work
on
theupper
two
or
three
dorsals.
We
are notadvising
that
you
adopt
their
systemin
case
you
wish
to
eat
with
due
regularity.
Osteopathyhasmadesteady,
constant
progress.
Some
of
us
*
have
progressedwith the
science.
*
Othershave
stood
still
and
thus
I
fallen behind.
f
When
we
first
introduced
our
a
antiseptic
in
19 00,
we
were
I
abusedloudly andwith
much
,
vigor.
We
weredenounced
asI
pro-medical,
as
well
as
a
lot
of
t
other
things.
.
We
were invited
to
exhibit
at
a
the
first
Chicago
national
meet-
l
ing
IF
we
would
show
ouranti-
o
septicskin
soap!
Seems
ridicu-lous,
was
ridiculous.Take
a
i
look
at the
exhibits
at
any
state
(Continued
on
page
3)
2
THE
LOG
BOOK-
 
TH
E
L.OG.
B0.OOK
The
Lo^
Book
The
Official
Publication
of
DESMOINES
STILL
COLLEGEOFOSTEOPATHY
President
-_:_----C.
W.
Johnson
Faculty
Advisor
--.
H.
V.
Halladay
Editor
R--
R.
K.
Homan
Osteopathy
Withoutjimitation
Our Purpose
In
taking
over
thetask
of
edit-ing
the
Log Book
for
the
school
year
of
1930-31,
it
is
our
pur-
pose to
give
to
the
students
and
alumni
of
DesMoines
Still
Col-
lege
of
Osteopathy,
not
only
thecurrent
happenings
in
and
around
the
school
and
interesting
pointsconcerning
the
menin
the
field,
but
to
take
up
andhavediscussed
by
competent
men,cer-
tain
practicalsubjects
which willbe
of'
interest
to
all
of
ourreaders.
We
shall
also
endeavor
to
keep
the
paperfree fromanytype
of
personaladvertisementin
so
far
as
we
are able.
It
is also
our purpose
to
re-main
open
for
suggestionsfromour
readers
as
to
the
type
of
ma-
terial
they
would like
to
'have
put
into
this paper.
In
closing,
let
us
allendeavorto make
thisthe
best
year
in
the
history.
of
Still
College.-R. K.
HOMAN.
Assembly,
May
23,
1930
(Continuedfrom
page
1
person
of
Bernie
Lowe,gave
sev-
eralvery
interesting
vocal
num-bers, accompanied
by
the trio.
HapKnowlin,
president
of
the
senior
class,
presented
D.M.S.C.O.
with
a
beautiful
emblem,which
we
hope
shalllead
our
very
fine
band
down
thestreets
of
Phila-
delphia
at
the National
Conven-
tion
this
summer.
Theclassalso
presented
the
school
with
a nice
grouppicture.
Asa
token
of
their
apprecia-
tion
of
her
very
fine
workduring
their
time
in
school,
the
May
class
of 1930
presented
Mrs.In-
nes
with
a
picture
album
that
she
may
rememberthem
in
the
years
to
come.
Thisalbum
con-
tainedan.
individualpicture
of
each
graduating
memberand
a
space
where
Mrs.
Innes
may
placesome
remembering
words.
A
fine
ideawhichhas
been
worked
out during
the last
fewweeks
of
school,wasexplained
by
Larry
St.
Amant.Each
stu-dent
was
asked:to!;procure
a
tag
at
twenty-five
'centsper,
the
funds
collectedto
be
used
as
a
nest
egg
in
the
further
develop-
ment
of
our
clinical
laboratory
The final
number
of
the
band
was a
marchplayedfor and
ded-
icated
to
Harry
Skinner,
whc
has
been
a
very
faithful
membei
of
that
organization.
Sixty-Six
Drugs
Used
(Continued
from page
.2)
or
national
meeting.
No!
Soap
is
NOT
barred.
Unfortunately,
the
fellow who
wishes
to
stand still
or
to
slide
back
quite often
hasa
loud
voice
andanabusivetongue,yet,
we
must not
blame
him-he
simplylives up to
his
ownfeeble
light.The
Old
Doctor had
eight
or
tenstudents
in hisfirst
class,
but
not
one
of
them
ever
equalled
the
old
master
in
point
of
skill-ful technic.
He
'hadsomething.'
Nor could
hepass
it
on,even
to
the
members
of
his
own
family.
If
all
of
us could
be
like
the
Old
Doctor
and
could
duplicatehisfeats,
then,
maybeand perhaps,
we
would
not
needhospitals,
sanitariums,
and
schools to
teach
materia
medica
and pharmacol-
ogy.
If
youcan
cureeverythingfrompimples
to piles
by
manip-
ulation,
glory
be!
But
do
notabuse
the
rest
of
us
who
cannotmatchyourpeerless
skill-The
Osteopath,
Oct.
29, 1929.
Publicity
(Continuedfrom
page
1
ventionwhen
it
goes
to
Seattle.
As
far
as
the
newspaperpublicity
is
concerned,they
are
allready
now.
Anotherthing
that
went
over big
was
a
radio
talk
byDr.
Gerdine. Those
folksknow
howto
do
things
in
the
Northwest.Theradio
will
be
available
when
we
make
the trip
to
Seattle.
Themeeting inUtah
waswell
caredfor
also.We
had
twomen
on
the
job
there
andthey
were
after
items
forthe
SaltLake
City
papers.
The
convention
in
number
.was
-up
to
standard
in
percentages
but
on
account
of
the
small
number
of
Osteopathsin
thestate, thequantity
was
low.
In
spite
of
this,there
was
something
in
the
papersevery
day
and
no
complaintshould
be
made
there.
If
you
are
failing
to
get
the
proper publicityfor yourworkandforyour meeting,
it
isbe-
cause you
have
not
laidplans
in
advanceand
have
not
taken