Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
57Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Vishnu Purana ( english translation) -- H.H.Wilson

Vishnu Purana ( english translation) -- H.H.Wilson

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2,535 |Likes:
Published by trojanhorse143
Vishnu Purana ( english translation) -- H.H.Wilson
THE
VISHNU PURÁNA,
A SYSTEM
OF
HINDU MYTHOLOGY AND TRADITION,
TRANSLATED
FROM THE ORIGINAL SANSKRIT,
AND
ILLUSTRATED BY NOTES
DERIVED CHIEFLY FROM OTHER PURÁNAS,
BY
H. H. WILSON
Vishnu Purana ( english translation) -- H.H.Wilson
THE
VISHNU PURÁNA,
A SYSTEM
OF
HINDU MYTHOLOGY AND TRADITION,
TRANSLATED
FROM THE ORIGINAL SANSKRIT,
AND
ILLUSTRATED BY NOTES
DERIVED CHIEFLY FROM OTHER PURÁNAS,
BY
H. H. WILSON

More info:

Published by: trojanhorse143 on Mar 21, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/02/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Page 1 of 671
THE
VISHŃ
U PURÁ
Ń
A,
A SYSTEM
OF
HINDU MYTHOLOGY AND TRADITION,
TRANSLATED
FROM THE ORIGINAL SANSCRIT,
AND
ILLUSTRATED BY NOTESDERIVED CHIEFLY FROM OTHER PURÁ
Ń
AS,
BY
H. H. WILSON, M. A. F.R
Ś
.
MEMBER OF THE ROYAL ASIATIC SOCIETY, AND OF THE ASIATIC SOCIETIES OF BENGAL AND PARIS; OF THEIMPERIAL SOCIETY OF NATURALISTS, MOSCOW; OF THE ROYAL ACADEMIES OF BERLIN AND MUNICH; PHIL. DR.IN THE UNIVERSITY OF BRESLAU AND BODEN PROFESSOR OF SANSCRIT IN THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD;&c. &c. &c.
LONDON,
The VishnuPurana
Translated by HoraceHayman Wilson
[1840]
 
Page 2 of 671
PUBLISHED BY JOHN MURRAY,ALBEMARLE STREET.[1840]
TOTHE CHANCELLOR, MASTERS, AND SCHOLARSOFTHE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD,THIS WORKIS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED BYH. H. WILSON,IN TESTIMONY OF HIS VENERATION FORTHE UNIVERSITY,AND IN GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF THE DISTINCTIONCONFERRED UPON HIMBY HIS ADMISSION AS A MEMBER,AND HIS ELECTIONTO THEBODEN PROFESSORSHIP OF THE SANSCRIT LANGUAGE.OXFORD,Feb. 10, 1840.
 
Page 3 of 671
PREFACE.
THE literature of the Hindus has now been cultivated for many years with singulardiligence, and in many of its branches with eminent success. There are some departments,however, which are yet but partially and imperfectly investigated; and we are far frombeing in possession of that knowledge which the authentic writings of the Hindus alonecan give us of their religion, mythology, and historical traditions.From the materials to which we have hitherto had access, it seems probable that therehave been three principal forms in which the religion of the Hindus has existed, at asmany different periods. The duration of those periods, the circumstances of theirsuccession, and the precise state of the national faith at each season, it is not possible totrace with any approach to accuracy. The premises have been too imperfectly determinedto authorize other than conclusions of a general and somewhat vague description, andthose remain to be hereafter confirmed or corrected by more extensive and satisfactoryresearch.The earliest form under which the Hindu religion appears is that taught in the Vedas. Thestyle of the language, and the purport of the composition of those works, as far as we areacquainted with them, indicate a date long anterior to that of any other class of Sanscritwritings. It is yet, however, scarcely safe to advance an opinion of the precise belief orphilosophy which they inculcate. To enable us to judge of their tendency, we have only ageneral sketch of their arrangement and contents, with a few extracts, by Mr. Colebrooke,in the Asiatic Researches a few incidental observations by Mr. Ellis, in the samemiscellany and a translation of the first book of the Sanhitá, or collection of the prayersof the Rig-veda, by Dr. Rosen and some of the Upanishads, or speculative treatises,attached to, rather than part of, the Vedas, by Rammohun Roy.Of the religion taught in the Vedas, Mr. Colebrooke's opinion will probably be receivedas that which is best entitled to deference, as certainly no Sanscrit scholar has beenequally conversant with the original works. "The real doctrine of the Indian scripture isthe unity of the Deity, in whom the universe is comprehended; and the seemingpolytheism which it exhibits, offers the elements and the stars and planets as gods. Thethree principal manifestations of the divinity, with other personified attributes andenergies, and most of the other gods of Hindu mythology, are indeed mentioned, or atleast indicated, in the Veda. But the worship of deified heroes is no part of the system;nor are the incarnations of deities suggested in any portion of the text which I have yetseen, though such are sometimes hinted at by the commentators".

Activity (57)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
Badloe liked this
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
chandralko liked this
Rakesh Pati liked this
BAHAAELAMIR liked this
sairamsk liked this
Aashim Usgaonkar liked this
tejaas liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->