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DMSCO Log Book Vol.24 1946

DMSCO Log Book Vol.24 1946

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Entered
assecondclass
matter,February
3rd,
1923,
at
thepost
office
at
DesMoines,
Iowa,
under
the
act
of
August
24th,
1912.
AATHE
Accepted
for mailing
at
special
rates
of
postage
1W7
I
B
'^^
E_1**
Hi
^
^^k*.provided
for
in
Section
*jI-ffBff
i^
**
fl
*1,103,
Act
of
Oct.3rd,
1917,
---
-J
--
9
*^
JJ
Mauthorized
Feb.
3rd,
19.23.
JLV^
BO
O K
®
A^_
-----
PUBLISHED
MONTHLYBY
THE
DES
MOINES
STILL
COLLEGEOFOSTEOPATHY
&
SURGERY
Volume
24
JANUARY,
1946
Number
1
CollegeWelcomes
Post-Graduates
At
the
opening
of
the
presentsemester,Still
College
welcomesbackto
itshallsand
classrooms,seven
formerstudentsfor
a
year
of
post-graduate
training.
Six
of
thesedoctors
have
recentlyre-
turned
from
service
in
thearm-
ed
forces.The
other
doctor
comnes
to
us
following
a
year
of
residency
in
surgery
at
Chicago.
Dr.
Jean
F.
LeRoque
of
LosAngeles,
California,
after
grad-
uating
from
D.M.S.C.O.
in
1940,
set
up
practice
at
Columbus
Junc-
tion, Iowa,
for
a
shorttime
be-
fore
enteringthe
Servicein
1941.
Hisone
and
a
half years
over-
seas
service
as
an
assistant
auto-
motive
officer
in
the
ordnance
section
of
Headquarters,
First
Army, gavehim
an
opportunity
to
visitEngland,
France,
Bel-gium,Holland,
Luxemborgand
Germany.
He
wasdischargedasa
captain
inNovember,
1945.
Dr.John
C.
Edgerton,
Boone,Iowa,
is
a
1941
graduate,haveentered
the
Servicein
the
fall
of
1942
following
severalmonths
of
successful
practice
at
Ottawa,
Iowa.
After
serving
at
severalNavalhospitalsandstations
in
the
U.
S.,
he
saw
servicein
boththeAtlanticand
Pacific
battle
areas.
He
was
dischargedwith
the
rank
of
chief
pharmacist'smate
after
approximately
three
years
of
service.
Dr.
Jack
R.Lilly
entered
the
U.S.
Armyin
1942
followinghis
graduation
in
the
spring
of
that
year.
He
received
his
discharge
in
February.
1943,
followingwhich
time
he
located
at
Gilman,Iowa,
where
he
carried
on
a
suc-
cessful
practice
until
December
of
1945.
Dr.
Lilly,
with
Mrs.
Lilly
and
their
onechild,
returned
to
Des Moines,
his
native
com-
munity,where
he
haspurchased
ahome
and
expects
tocontinue
his
practice.
Dr.
iChristianL.
HIenkel
is
a
1941
graduate
who
interned
at
the
Rocky
MountainOsteopathicHospital
in
Denverbeforeprac-ticing
in
DesMoines
until
Decem-
ber,
1942,
at
which
time
he
enter-
ed
the
Navy.
During
hisservice,
Dr.Henkelspent
one
and
a
half
years
overseas
in
the
Pacific
area
following
one
year
in
the
States.
Upon
his
return
from
the
Pacific,
he
underwent
surgery
at
Oak
Knoll
NavalHospital
at
Oakland,
California.
From
there
hewent
toYosemiteConvalescent
Hos-
pitalforsixty
days
before
his
dis-
charge
as chief
pharmacist'smate
inOctober,
1945.
Of
Portsmouth,
Ohio,
Dr.
Robert
E.Rheinfrank
worked
Picture
takenDecember
12,
1945
at
the
meeting
of
the
members
of
the
Board
of
Trustees
of
the
A.O.A.with
the
Presidents
andDeans
of
the
AmericanAssociation
of
Osteopathic
Colleges.
Anarticle
dealingwith
the
meetingappeared
in
last
month's
issue
of
the
Log
Book.
withDr.
Thomas
C.
Swope
of
Portsmouth
forseveralmonths
after
his
graduationfrom
D.M.S.
C.O.
in
June,
1941.
Upon
his
entrance
in
the
Navy,
January,
1942,
Dr.
Rheinfrank
saw
serv-
ice
at
the
GreatLakesHospital;
at
Oxford,
Ohio,
andNorfolk,Virginiabefore
spending
twenty-three
months
in
the
Pacific.
He
was
discharged
October,
1945,
with
the
rank
of
chief
phar-
macist'smate.
Dr.John
M.
Lyle,
of
DesMoines,
a
1934
graduate
of
the
College,
entered
the
Navyin
February,
1942.
He
spenteightmonths
at
the;
GreatLakesNavalHospitalTrainingStationbeforebeing
transferred
to
the
First
MarineAmphibious
Corps,
with
whichhe
servedin
the
South
Pacificfor
twenty-three
months.
Return-
ingto
theStates
in October
1944,
hewason
duty
at
the
Naval
Spe-
cial
Hospital
at
Nashville,
North
Carolinafor
eleven
months.
Hereceivedhis
discharge
as
a
pharmacist'smatefirst
classin
October,
1945.
OfDesMoinesalso,
Dr.WilliamH.Rodgers
is
a
1943
graduate
ofK.C.C.O.S.,
havingpreviouslyspent
three
years
at
the
DesMoines
Still
College.
After
his
graduation
he
continued
hismedicalstudies
for
one
year
in
Kansas
City,
later
serving
asan
interne
andresidentin
surgery
both
in
Chicago
and
Phoenix,
Arizona,
for
two
years,
1944-46.
Dr.Rodgers,inaddition
to
his
post-graduatework
at
the
Col-
lege,
has
recently
taken
over
the
practice
left
byDr.
Raymond
Kale.
Dr.
Forbes
Donates
ObstetricalTable
The
Obstetrical
Clinicof
D.M.S.C.O.S.
recently
became
the
re-cipient
ofa
muchneedednew
portableobstetricaltable
given
by
Dr.
J.
R.
Forbes
of
Swea
City,
Iowa.Those
ofuswho
remember
doinghomedeliveries
ona
"prop-
ped
up,"
kitchentableor
asag-ging,
lowbed,
especially
ap-
preciate
the
value
of
this
gift
to
the
Clinic.
Students
and
staffmembers
joinin
extending
our
sincere
thank
you
to Dr.Forbesfor this
practical
contribution.
While
at
Still,
Dr.Forbes
did
special
work
in
the
Obstetrical
Clinic,
thus
realizing
the
need
for
such
equipment.
Living
Endowment
Contributions
Since
publication
of
the
Decem-
ber
LogBook,
three
doctors
have
subscribed
to
the
extensive
future
developments
of
Still
College
through
generouscontributions
to
to
the
Living
Endowment
Fund.
They
are:
Dr.
C.
A.
Means,
Marietta,
Georgia
Dr.
Edgar
W.
Kapfer,
Green-
field,
Iowa
Dr.
Harry
L.
Barquist,
DesMoines,Iowa
Dr.
R.L.McMurray
Joins
Faculty
At
thebeginning
of
the
new
year,Still
College
added
one
moreestimable
assetto
its
grow-ing
list when
Dr.
Robert
L.
Mc-
Murray
ofColumbus,
Ohio,
was
selected
as
instructor
of
bio-
chemistry
and
pharmiacology.
Hebegan
his
duties
at
the
College,
January
7.
Education
Dr.McMurrayreceivedhis
B.
Sc.
Degree
fromthe
College
of
Pharmacyat
Ohio
State
Univer-
sity
in
1926;
his
M.
Sc.
in
1931I
and
his
Ph.
D.
in
1933
in,
pharmacologyfrom
the
Univer-
sity
ofWisconsin.Healso
at-
tended
the
University
of
NorthDakota
MedicalSchool
in
1942-
44,
and
in
1941
was
a
student
at
theUnversity
of
Idaho.
Experience
Hisdiversified
experience
in
pharmaceuticalwork
qualifies
Dr.
MicMurray
excellently
for
hisnew
position.
His
work
as
industrialchemistforParke-Davis
&
Co.
in
1927
was
firstsupplemented
by
that
of
reliefpharmacist
in
vari-
ous
stores,
and
later
superseded
by
the duties
of
a
pharmacy
in-
structoratNorth
Dakota
Uni-
versity
(1927-29),
Washington
State
College
(1933-35;1940-42),
Ohio
State
University
(1935-1940).
Public
Service
Dr.McMurrayserved
as
chair-man
of
District
No.
4
Colleges
of
Boards
of
Pharmacy
in
1940;
was
secretary
of
the
Section
on
Pharmacognosyand
Pharma-
cologyof
the
American
Associa-
tion
ofCollegesof
Pharmacology
in
1939;
andeditor
of
The
Bulle-
tin
of
the
Central
Ohio
Academy
of
Pharmacy
in
1938.
He
is
a
member
of
Sigma
Xi,Rho
Chi,
andPhi
Sigma,
honorary
societies,
and
the
social
fra-ternity,
Kappa
Psi.Dr.McMurray
is
a
registeredpharmacistin
Ohio,
North.
Dakota,and
Wisconsin.Hecomes
to
us
highly
recom-mended
as
an enthusiastic,
effi-
cient,
and
loyal
worker
who
hasalreadyrevealed\
his
cooperative
spirit andindustriousness.
He
hasa
keenanalytical
mind,yet
is
quietandunassuming.
We
areproud
to
welcome
Dr.McMurray
toour
staffand shall
be
happy
to
meet
Mrs.
McMurray
and
the
young
daughter
when
they
arrive
in
Des
Moines.
b
»
A....
a,
-
:
T
\
7./
.
l
 
THE
LOG
B
OO
K
-
isr-.,--._----
New
and
Returning
StudentEnrollment
Students
IsIncreasing
A
number
of
new
studentsand
also
a group
of
formerstudents
haveenrolledin
the
College
this
semester.Among
the
group
areeightFreshmen,
one
Sophomore,
one
Junior,
and
three
Seniors.Howard(Bud)
Wicks,
of
Des
Moines,
Freshman,
hashis
B.A.
degreefrom
the
University
of
Iowaandhis
M.A.
degree
from
Greeley,Colorado.
Robert
L.
Pettit,
also of
DesMoines,
Freshman,attended
the
University
of
Iowa
priorto
the
time
he
entered
the
Army.Bryce
E.
Wilson,Des
Moines,
Freshman,attended
Creston
Junior
College
and
Drake
Uni-
versity.
A
captain
in
the
ArmyAir
Corps,
heserved
as a
pilotin
the
AleutianIslandsfor two
years.
Stan
J.
Sulkowski,
Philadelphia,
Pa.,
formerlyattended
TempleUniversity.
He
is
married
andhas
one
daughter.
Marsh
Campbell,
Jackson,Michigan,
Freshman,
tookhispre-osteopathic
trainingat
Jack-
son
Junior
College.
Kenneth
M.
Roberts,
Greenfield,Iowa,
Freshman,attended
Fort
Dodge
Junior
College.He
servedas a
lieutenant
in
the
Navyandhasreceived
the
D.F.C.
Kenneth
Schwab,Middletown,
Ohio,
Freshman
A,
is
a
graduate
of
Purdue
University
where
he
receivedhis
B.S.
degreeinchemical engineering.
He
hasworkedin
the
metallurgical
field
for
eightyears.
Up
until
a
veryshorttime
ago
he was
a
lieu-
tenant
in
the
Navy.
Prior
to
enteringthe
Navyhe wasen-rolled
at
Still.
EugeneStano,
Detroit,
Michi-gan,
Freshman
A,
is
returning
to
Still
after
an
absence
of
three
years,
during
which
time
hewasservingas
a
lieutenant
in
the
ArmyAir
Corps.
Sarah
Jean
Gibson,
Des
Moines,
Sophomore
A,
returns
to
Still
after
28
months
in
the
WAVES
where
she
servedin
the
Hospital
Corps.
FloydToland,Augusta,Illinois,
Junior
A,
has
re-enrolled
after
an absence
of
two
years.Edward
Lake,
Jr.,Ferguson,
Missouri,
Senior
B,
completedhis
first
three
years
of
osteopathy
at
the
Kirksville
College.
He
servedas
pharmacist's
mate
in
the
Navy.
Paul
Caris,
Westerville,
Ohio,
Senior
B, is
re-entering
Still
after
an
absence
of
two years.GeraldRosenthal,
Detroit,
Michigan,
Senior
A,
servedasensignin
the
NavalAir Force,
havingleftStill
in
1943
to
enter
service.
James
Allender,Philipp,WestVirginia,Sophomore
B,
served
in
the
chemical
warfare
division
with the
army
in
the
SouthPacific
for
two
years.
The
studentenrollment
at
D.M.
S.C.O.S.
has
taken
a
big
stride
upward,
as
the
figure
for the
first
week
of
the
new
semester
shows
58
studentsregistered.There
are,inaddition,
15
stu-dents
who
are
hoping
to
arrive
for
school
before
the
deadline
for
late
registration,
January
28.
Their
delay
is
caused
either
by
failure
to
be
releasedfrom
the
Servicein timefor
theearly
registration,
or
the
necessity
to
complete
their
preprofessionalwork
at
someschoolwhose
semester
endstoo
late
forearly
registration
here.The
presentenrollment
figures
byclasses
are
as
follows:
fresh-
men
14,
sophomores
6,
juniors
12,
seniors
19,
and
post-graduates
7.
With
therelease
of
anever-increasing
number
of
men
and
womenfrom
the
ArmedServices,
the
College
is
preparing
for
a
steady
risein
the
number
of
stu-dents
for
the
nextfourto
six
semesters.This
anticipation
is
welljustified,for
the
enrollmentsituation
is
already
"looking
up."
To
aid
students
who
are
seek-ing
information
concerning
re-quirementsforthe
professionalcourseinosteopathy,
the
pre-
professional
requirementsare
list-
edbelow.
Everypracticing
phy-sicianshould
acquaint
himselfwith
theserequirements
so
that
he
might
render
aquickandvaluableservice
to
an
interest-
ed
prospect
forourranks.
1.
Graduation
fromanaccredited
four
years
high
school,
and
2.
Two
years
(60
semesterhours)
ofcollege
credit.Thismini-mum
of
60
semesterhoursmust
include
at
least:
6
semester
hours
of
English
(in-cludingcomposition
or
rhetoric)
8
semester
hours
of
biology
(or
zoology)
8
semester
hours
of
physics
8
semester
hours
of
general
in-organic
chemistry
4
semester
hours
of
organic
chemistry
26
semester
hours
of
electives
It
is
suggested
that
the
electives
be
selected
on
a
cultural
rather
than
ascientific
basis-in
history,
literature,
publicspeaking,
mod-
ern
language,
economics,
political
science,
psychologyand
philoso-phy.
Prospective
students
who
be-
lieve
they
have
metentrancere-quirements
shouldapplyfor
matriculation.
An
application
blank
will
be
furnished
on
re-
quest.The
matriculation
fee
is
$10.00,
payablewhen
the
applica-tion
is
made.The
college
where
the
pre-osteopathicwork
was
taken
should
be
requestedtoforward
a
transcript
of
college
creditsto
theDirector
of Admissions
at
DesMoines
Still
Collegeof Osteo-
pathy
and
Surgeryfor
evaluation.The
tuition
fee
is
$155
asemesteror
$300
a school
year.The
costof
books
andequipmentrequired
of
each
studentaverages
$50
a
semester.
A
veteran
who
plans
tore-
ceive
his
training
under
the
G.I.
Billof
Rights
should
file
Form
No.
1950
with
his
local
office
of
theVeterans'Administrationthenrequest
that
all
his
papers
be
forwardeddirectly
to
the
Des
Moines
office
of
the
Veterans'
Administration.
A
still
better
plan
is
to
file
Form
No.
1950
originallywith
the
DesMoines
office
and
save
any
possible
delay
of
transfer.
Anyphysicianor
interested
layindividualdesiring
further
in-
formation
concerning
the
require-
ments
forentrance
intoour
school
should
write
the
Dean's
Office
for moredetailed
informa-
tion.
Loan
Fund
for
Worthy
Students
At
thistime
more
students,
both
old
and
new,
are
entering
our
Collegedoors,
seekingto
be-
come
prepared
in
a
life's
pro-
fession.
Manyof
thesestudentsarenotveterans
and
therefore
are
not
eligible
forgovernment
aid
under
the
G.I.
Bill
of
Rights.
For
these
students,
some
of
whommayfacedifficulty
in
ob-
taining
sufficientfinancialback-ing
to
carry
their
training
to
completion,
ourStudent
Loan
Fund
exists.The
Student
Loan
Fund
of
the
AmericanOsteopathic
Associa-
tion,
first
organizedin
1931,
is
governedbyacommitte
on
Stu-
dent
Loan
Fund.
Thepurpose
of
theorganization
is
toprovidemoney
for
loans
to
enable
upper
class
students
inosteopathic
col-
leges
to
obtain
their
degreeswhootherwisewould
be
forced
to
discontinue
their
studiesbecause
of
lack
of
sufficient
money.
Thefund
is
derived
from
moneyreceived
throughthe
sale
of
the
osteopathic
Christmas
sealsand
from
gifts
and
dona-tionsfromindividualsandor-ganizedgroups,bothinand
out
of
the
profession.Candidates
for
suchloans
must
be
deservingseniorsor
juniors
of
anapprovedosteopathic
schoolwho
require
financialassistancetocomplete
their
osteopathiceducationandwho
meet
the
qualifications
for
aloan.Suc-cessfulcandidates
must
pass
a
satisfactory
physical
examination,must
havea scholastic
standing
in
theupper
quartile
of
their
class,
and
must
be
dependable,
trustworthy,
andpromisingin-dividuals.They
must
also
haveexhausted
all
othermeans
of
financialaid.
Students
seekingsuchaloanshould
anticipate
theiractual
need
for
the
loanandshouldap-ply
early
to
theFaculty
Ad-
visoryCommittee
on
Student
Loan
Fund
of
their
college.
NOTICE
Ifandwhenyouchange
your
address,
please
notifythe
LogBook
promptly.
A_
ThePresident
Chats
Edwin
F.
Peters,
Ph.D.
The
firstmonth
as
President
of
the
DesMoines
Still
Collegeof
Osteopathyand
Surgeryhas
been
a
mostenjoyableand
pleasant
experience.The
warmth
of
welcomereceivedfrom
the
pro-
fessionby
telegrams,
telephone
calls,
letters
and
personal
visits
thoroughly
exemplifies
that
the
profession
is
firmlysupportingthis
institution
and
that
the
Des
PresidentPeters
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteo-
pathy
and
Surgery
shallforgeaheadtonew
heights
inosteo-
pathic
education.The
new
OsteopathicClinicalHospital
is
progressing
even
thoughtheplumbers
have
been
on
strikethe
past
two
weeks.It
is
mysinceredesiretohave
this
new
unit
of
our
college
open
within
the
next
sixtydays.
But
the
NewOsteopathicClinical
Hos-
pitalmustnot
terminate
our
dreamsforthis
college.
This
great
addition
is
merelythe
be-
ginning
of
an expansionprogram.At
thepresenttime
the
architect
is
preparing
hisdrawings
for
another
building
adjacentto
the
NewClinical
Hospitalandextend-ingto
the
ConsistoryTemple.This
unit
willhousea
college
library
and
seminar
rooms
on
thefirst
floor.
An
auditorium
on
the
secondfloor
and
the
rear
of
the
buildingwill
be
devoted
to
a
department
of
Physiotherapy,the
third
floorwill
be
devoted
to
hospital
beds,
thus
increasing
the
number
ofbeds
forthe
New
ClinicalHospital
from
92
to
ap-
proximately
150.
Plansare
also
being
formulatedfor
additional
units
to
be
addedto
your
college,
whichwill
be
an-nounced
at
a
later
date.
It
is
the
sinceredesire
of
your
new
President
that
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathy
andSurgery
shall
become
the
meccaof
osteopathiceducation.For
this
to
be
realized,
it
will
be
im-
perative
that
everyalumniandallfriends
of
this
great
college
rally
to
this
institution
with
(Continued
on
Page
3)
 
THE
LOG BOOK
The
LoA
Book
The
Official
Publication
of
DESMOINES STILL
COLLEGE
OF OSTEOPATHY
&
SURGERY
Acting
Editor
H. W.
MERRILL,
M.S., D.O.
Assistant
H.
B.
HALE,
M.S.,
Ph.D.
OsteopathyWithout
Limitation
BetterYears
Ahead!
Another
milestone has beenpassed.
With this,
the
first
issueof Volume
24
of
the
Log
Book,
we
mark the
commencement
of
another
even
greateryearat
the
Des
Moines
Still
College of Osteo-
pathy
andSurgery.
Should we
do
a
little
stock
taking,
we
would
find
our
school
better
than
ever before.
Our
physical
plant,
the
College
build-
ingitself,
is
moremodernand
equipped
more adequately
than
at
any time
in
the history
of
the
school.
TheNew Clinical
Hospital,
once
but
a
dream,
is
fast
becoming a
realization
of
that
dream.
Our
institution
is
managedanddirected
by capa-
ble
and
visionary
executive
offi-
cers,
president,
and
board
of
trus-
tees.The
faculty
andclinic
staff
have
beenselectedbecause
of
their
competency in
their
re-
spective
fields.
The
studentsare
enthusiastic
and
are
shouldering
their
re-
sponsibility
100
per
cent.
Last,
but
by
no
means
least,
the
alumniand
professionhave
caughtthis
contagious
spirit
of
cooperationwhich
has
nowbecome
of epi-
demic
proportion,
in
support
of
the
D.M.S.C.O.S.
Osteopathyand oursuperior
in-
stitution,havingprogressed
beyond
the
crossroads,
are
well
on
the
road
tosuccess
and
tre-
mendous
growth.
It
is
necessary,however,
that
our
profession
and
our
Alma
Mater
have
the
fulland
united
support
of
every
prac-ticing
physician.
Each
individual
may
do
his
part, but
unanimous
support
and
united
effort
areextremely
vital.
According
to
railroad
men,
a
hobo
is
onewho
rideswithout
paying.
He
is
one
who
reaps
the
necessities
and
benefits
of
life
with
the
poorest
or
least
outlay
of
effort or support.
Just
as
the
railroadshave
their
hobos,
so
do
other
social, economic,
and
pro-fessional groups. These
arethe
personswho
are
always on
the
receivingend
andare
so
slow
on
the contributing
end
that
they
usually
don't
quite get to
the
actual
contribution.
If
our
school
and
profession
are
to
expand, we
mustconvertour
"hobos"
intoworkers.
For-tunately,
we
have
but
fewwho
are
not
giving
their
full support.
We
again
solicit
the
support
of
everyalumnus
of
our
Alma
Mater.Let
us
carry
on toeven
greater
achievements
in
the
yearsahead
of
us.
Let
us
put
D.M.S.
C.O.S.
intothe
lead
of
the
osteo-
President
(Continued
fromPage
2)
their
enthusiasm,
good-will
and
DOLLARS.
NinteenHundred
Forty-sixmust
be
theyear
that
osteopathyand
itsmerits
shall
beon
the
lips
of
everyperson
as
Iowa
cele-
brates
its
hundredthanniversary
as
a
state.
Dean's
Letter
For
some
time
theDepartment
of
Clinical
Pathologyhas
beenoffering
work
in
office
laboratory
diagnosticprocedures.
So
great
has
been
theinterest
in
the
work
that
it
deserves
theattention
of
LogBook
readers.
The
work
in
laboratory
diagnosis
is
available
as
a
special
tutoring
course
to doctor's
as-
sistants
andnurses.
Standard,routine
procedures
are
covered,
Dr.
0.
E.
Owen,
Dean
such as:
(1)
Erythrocyte
count,
(2)
Leucocytecount,
(3)
Hemo-
globin,
Shalland
Leitz methods,
(4)
Schilling
differential
leucocytecount,
(5)
Erythrocyte
sedi-
mentationrate,
(6)
Urine
analy-
sis,
physical,chemicaland micro-
scopic,
(7)
Gram
stain
procedure.Additional
tests
may
be
included
on
request.Tuitionfor
the
course
is
$25.00
per
week.
Stu-dentswork
in
the
Clinical
Pathology
Laboratory
daily
from
9:00a.m.to5:00
p.m.
undertheconstant
supervision
and
instruc-
tion
of
the LabratoryInstructor,
Miss
Estella
Farley,
A.B., M.A.
A
minimumtime
of
two
weeks
is
recommended,dependingupon
the
backgroundand
previousex-
perience
of
the
individual
takingthe
work.
Writethe
Dean's
Office
foradditionalinformation,
in-cluding
timewhen
the
course
is
given.
At
present,
the
work
is
offered
monthly.
O.
EDWIN
OWEN,
B.S.,
M.A.,
D.O.
Deanpathiceducationalinstitutions.Let
us
make
DesMoines
the
mecca
of
osteopathy.Let
uscon-
tinue
to
be
workers,supporters,and
contributors
to
the
end
that
our
schoolwill
be
upheld
as
the
leading
college
in
the
medicalworld.
A
FibrinolyticEnzymeIn Menstruation
&
Late
Pregnancy
Toxemia
Experimental
studieshave
shown
that
menstrual
dischargelacks
prothrombin
and
fibrinogen,which
suggests
that
the
blood
hasclottedand
the
clot
dissolved.
In
order
to find
support for
the
idea
that
fibrinolytic
action
occurs
in
theuterus, researchworkers
have
attempted
to
demonstrate
anendometrialproteolytic
en-zyme.
On
theoretical
grounds,
such
an
enzymewould
be
pro-ducedas a
result
of
the
with-drawal
of
hormonalsupport.
Ithasalsobeen shown
that
the
euglobulin
fraction
of
menstrual
discharge
is
very
toxic,
and
ithas beensuggested
that
the
toxin
is
an
alteredprotein
producedby
the
action
of
the
above-men-
tioned
enzyme.
If
this
is so,
then
possibly
this
toxic by-prod-
uct
is
the
finalcause
of
vascular
injury
and
the
induction
of
men-
struation.
Since
the
hormonal
situation
in
toxemia
of
late
pregnancy
is
analogousto
thatat
the
time
of
menstruation
and
the
gen-eralized
vascular
changes
similarto
the
local
one
in
the
men-
struating
endoemtrium,twoworkers,
0.
W.
Smithand
G.
V.
Smith,
of
theFear-
ing
ResearchLaboratory,
Free
Hospital
for
Women,Brookline,
Massachusetts,havetheorized
that
this
disease
might
be
due
to
a
similartoxin.
Their
studies,
re-cently
reported
in SCIENCE,
brought
out
that
toxins
are
absent
from
the
circulating
blood
at the
the
endometrial"debris"
and
in
time
of
menstruationbut
that
the
fibrinolytic
enzymewasfound
in
themenstrual
"serum".
Theenzymewas
also
foundin venous
blood
during menstruationbut
not
duringtheintermenstrum.
The
sera
of
women
withabnormal
uterine
bleeding
were
fibrinolyticas
were
the
sera
of
normal
women
24
and
48
hours
before
the
on-set
of
flow.
Normally,
the
cir-
culating
bloodof
pregnant
womenhas
no
fibrinolytic
activity,
but
in
patients
with
late
pregnancy
toxemia,
with
eclampsia,
orun-dergoingmiscarriage
the
cir-
culating
blood
contained
the
en-
zyme.
Sera
fromthese
same
patients
when
they
had beendeliveredand
were
well failed
to
show
the
presence
of
the
enzyme.
Although
the
enzyme
and
toxin are
both
concentrated
in
the
euglobulin
fraction
of
menstrual
discharge,
they are
not
identical.
It
is
thought
that
pathological
syn-dromesassociated
with
cellular
injury
fromany
cause
might
be
the
effect
of
the
release
of
toxicby-products
of
proteolysis
from
the
action
of
this
enzyme.
In-
jured
tissuemay
producea pro-
teolytic
enzyme.Thewomen
students
of
Still
College
wish to
extend
a welcometo
the
new
studentsandthose
returning
to continue
their
studies.
We
are
especially
glad
towelcomeback
Miss
SarahJean
Doctors
Change
Locations
Dr.
Glenn
C.
Munger,
former-
ly
of
Woodland,Michigan,
is
now
located
at
1100-2-4
CentralNa-
tional
Tower,
Battle
Creek,Michigan.Dr.
Ralph
Irish recently
leftEads,Colorado,
to
practice
at
1120
South
Dale
Court,
Denver,Colorado.
In
Iowa,Dr.
R.
WilliamWest-
fall
has
transferred
from
Ackleyto
Boone,
where
he hasjoinedhis
father,
Dr.
R.
P.
Westfall,
who hasbeenin
practice
there
forseveral
years.
Their
offices
are
located
in
the
Citizens Na-
tionalBank
Building.The
Log Book
extends
sincere
best
wishes
to
each
of
these
doc-
tors
in
their
new communities
andappreciates
beingadvised
of
the
newlocations.
Dr.
Snyder at Ledyard
Dr.
Richard
F.
Snyder,
Octo-
ber,
1944,
graduate
of
"Still"
has
recently
opened
offices
at
Led-
yard,
Iowa.
Following
his
gradual
tion
Dr.
Snyder
interned
at
Detroit
Osteopathic
Hospital
forone
year.