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DMSCO Log Book Vol.31 1953

DMSCO Log Book Vol.31 1953

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OSTEOPATHICPHYSICIANS
Log
PHYSICIANS
PLUS
0~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
PUBLISHED
MONTHLY BY
THE
DESMOINES
STILL
COLLEGEOF OSTEOPATHY
&
SURGERY
Vol. No.
30
JANUARY,
1953
Number
1
Anniversary
CHICAGO,
(AOA)-Iota
Tau
Sigma,
first
osteopathic
fraterni-
ty,celebrates
its
golden
anniver-
sary this
year.
'The
Alpha
chap-
ter
was
chartered
at
Kirksville
May
23,
1903,
although
it
wasfounded
in
December,
1902.
Dr.
Alexander
F.
McWilliamsofBoston,
one
of
the
originalfounders,
is
thecurrent
presi-
dent.The society
has
1750
mem-
bers and
a
chapter
at
each of
the
six
osteopathic
colleges.
Dr.
Fitz
Joins
College Family
man,
Ph.D.,Des
Moines,
Iowa.
Dr.
Erle
W.
Fritz
Erle
W.
Fitz,
D.O.,
joined
thefaculty
of
DMSCOS
December
1,
1952
as Chairman
of
the
Divisionof
Psychiatry.
Dr.
Fitz,
a
1942
graduate
of
Kirksville
College
of
Osteopathyand
Surgery,interned
in
the
Massachusetts
OsteopathicHos-
pital
in
Jamaica Plains,
Boston,
Massachusetts.
Following
6
years
as a
general
practitioner
in Medford,Massa-
chusetts,Dr.
Fitz
began his
3
year
Residencyin
Psychiatry
in
Still-HildrethSanatorium
at
Ma-
2on,
Missouri
on
December
1,
1949.
Dr.Fitz
is
married
and
has
two
sons-William,
8,
and
Ste-
phan,
18
months. The
family
residence is
at
1013
Kingman
Circle.
Whentwo
former
Russian
prisoners
of
war
get
together
theyreminisce;usually
each
one
has an
incredible
story
to tell,incredible
for
the
civilized world,
but
commonplace
in
Russia.Before
Christmas,
1952,
Dr.
Walter
E.
Heinlen,
Chief Surgeon
at
Still OsteopathicHospital,
asked Dr.
Ernst
V.
Enzman,
instructor
inEmbryology
at
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathy and Surg-ery
if
he
would
visit
with
one
of
his
patients.
Dr
He.inlen
explained
to
Dr.
Enzman
that
Mr.
Ploog came
from Germany
years
ago
and
would
enjoy
visiting
with
someone
with
whom
he
could
reminisce.
After
the
first
"Wie
Geht's", your
Editor,
who
accompanied
Dr.
Enmzan
on
his
visit with
Mr.
Ploog,
felt
likea
forgotten
spectator
at
old
homeweek.
Watching
these
men-the
smiles
on
their
faces,thetwinkle
in
their
eyes,
hearing
the
sound of
their
laughter,
and,
then-the
grim
look on
their
faces, the change
of
the
tone
in
their
voices
and
the
absence of
laughter,
gave
one
the
impression
that
these
people
were
reliving
events
in
their
lives-happy
daysof
their
youth and
then the
times
which
they
wanted
to
forgetbut
could
not.
It
wasn'tuntil the next
day
that
your
Editor
found out
that
these
twomen discovered
that
they had
been
Russian
prisoners
of
war
in
Siberia
35
years
ago.
Mr.Ploog
for
six
years,
from
1915
until
1921
andDr.Enzman
for
five
years,
from
1916
until
the summerof
1921.
Dr.Enzman
was
an Austrian army
officerand
Mr.
Ploog, a memberof
the
German
infantry.
Some
of
the
things
they
talked
about
seemed
more like
fiction
than actual
happenings.
These
they
did
not
wantprinted.
They
did
consent to
the
following.The
"whites"
were
defeated and fled leaving
the city
of Swerd-lowsk
empty
of soldiers. The
victorious
Reds
entered the
city
two
hours
later. During
these
two
hours,
the prisoners
of
war
took
over
(Continued
on
Page
2)
Ontario Osteopaths
Win
Battle,
Are
Granted
Self-Rule
TORONTO,
(AOA)
-The
in-
fluential
Toronto
Daily
Star,
with
Canada'slargest
circula-
tion-over
450,000-in
a
3-col-
umn
article
under
a
6-column
headline
reports
under
a
headline
as
above:
"The
20-year
battle
by
On-
tario
osteopaths
for
the
right
to
govern,license
and
examine
mem-
bers
of
their
profession
ended
in
victory todaywith
announce-
ment
by
the
provincial govern-ment
that
aboard
of
directors
of
osteopathy has
been
estab-
lished."Theorders-in-council posted
today
allows
osteopaths to
set
up
a
governing boardwith
power
to
discipline and license
their
own
members
and
have
control
over
qualifications."Chairman
of
the
new
board
will
be
Dr.
Douglas
Firth,
direc-
tor
of public
relationsfor
the
Ontario Osteopathic
Association.
"Dr.Firth
saidtheprofession
would continue to
press
for
new
legislation
whichwould
grant
osteopaths
broader
practicerights.
This
includes
the
right
to.
performsurgery
when
qualified,prescribe
durgs
and
assume
the
title
'doctor'."
Sixth
Annual
Academy
Prize
Contest
TheAcademy of Applied
Os-
teopathy
announces
its
Sixth
An-
nual
Prize
Contest. Cashprizesof
$100.00
for
first
prize,
$75.00
for
second
prize and
$50.00
for
third
prize will
be
awarded
for
the
threebest papers
of notmore
than
2,500
words
submitted
by
any
Junior
orSenior
student
of
Osteopathy
on
the
following
subject:
"The
Role
of
the
Osteo-
pathic
Lesionin Chronic Degen-
erative
diseases."
Three
copies
must
be
submitted
to
the
Director
of
the
Bureau
ofA
c
a
d
e
m
y
Publications. Dr.
Thomas
L.
Northup,AltamontCourt Apts,
Morristown,N.
J.,
before
April
1,
1953.
If
andwhen
you
change
your
address,please
notify
the
LOG
BOOK
promptly.
.-
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~%
%
-I
I
 
THE
LOG
BOOK
Max
M.
Stettner,
Instructor
in
Biochemistry,andClinicalBiochemist,
Still
OsteopathicHospital
Clinical
TestUseful
In
theDiagnosis
Of
Pancreatic
Disease
Clinically
we
are
limited
to
ex-
amination
of
the
enzymes
of
the
pancreas,
as
theyappear
in
the
blood
stream,
feces
andduodenal
fluids.
Brieflythepancreas
manufacturesfour
enzymes
of
importance,
which
act
upon
each
of
the
basic
food
materials
of
the
human
body
-
lipase
acting
on
fats,
amylase
acting
on
starches
and
trypsin
andchymotrypsin
acting
on
proteins.Laboratory
de-
ing
on
proteins.Laboratory
de-
termination
ofthese
ferments
is
extremely
important
in
differen-
tial
diagnosisofacute
or
chronichemmorhagic
pancreatitis.
Ser-um
amylaseandlipasedetermi-
nations
are
always
regardedas
emergency
tests
and
shouild
be
performed
immediatelyuponad-missionto
a
hospital
andbefore
any
sedation
is
administered.
The
serum
amylaseis
usually
expressedin
Somogi
Units,
since
the
Somogi
methodor
some
varia-
tion
of
it
is
thebasis
ofany
laboratory
determination
today.The
normal
range
is
from
30
to
80
units.
The
principle
of
the
chemical
determination
istoin-cubatea
starchsubstrate
with
a
known
quantity
of
serum
fora
definiteamount
of time,
at
70°C.,
and
to
measure
thequantity
of
reducing
sugars
liberated
by
actionof
the
enzyme.
In
acute
pancreatitis
theserumamylaserisesvery
sharply
and
within
six
hours
of
the
start
ofan
attack
and
can
reachtheamazing
levels
of
1200
to
1500
units.
For
diag-nostic
purposesany
value
over
300
units
is
positive
for
the
diag-nosis
of
acute
pancreatitis.
The
serum
amylasereaches
its
peak
within
24
hours,then
maintains
this
level
about
48
hours,fol-
lowed
by a
sharp
drop,
and
with-
in
a
week
from
start
of
theat-tack
is
usually
down
tonormal
levels.
Therefore
it
is
impera-
tive
that
determinations
be
made
early
in
the
clinicalcourseof
the
disease.Thevalueofserum
lipase
de-
terminations
is
in
the
diagnosis
of
chronic
recurrentpancreatitis.
The
normal
values
in
serum
is
from
0.1
to
1.1
units,
where
1unit
is
equalto
1ml.
of
0.05
Normal
sodiumhydroxide,which
is
usedto
titrate
the
fatty
acids
liberated
by
the
lypolitic
activity
upon
a
fat
or
oil
substrate.
The
principle
of
thedetermination
is
incubationof
a
fat
base
(EthylButyrate)
with
aknown
quantity
of
the
patient's
aerum
at
37°
C.
for
24
hours,
and
to
measurethe
fatty
acids
liberated
by
titration
with
sodiumhydroxide.Themethodused
is
that
of
Myers.
The
lipase
levels
areinitially
ele-
vated(usually
in
the
range
of4
to
6
units)
in
attack
of
recur-
rent
chronic
pancreatitis,
rises
for
about
72
hours
following
theattack,
andthenvery
slowly
re-
turns
to normal.By
contrastthe
serumlipaseis
normal
in
acute
pancreatitis
at
the
onset,
andthenrises
slowly
after
about
72
hours,
reaching
its
peak
in
about
a
week.
Insummary,
an
initial
high
amylase
and
a
low
lipase
is
in-
dicativeof
acute
pancreatitis;a
low
or
slightly
elevatedamylaseanda
higher
than
normal
lipase
indicative
of chronic
pancreatitis,
and
neithersituation
is
indicated
in
the
absenceof
either
of
these
conditions.Space
permits
only
the
men-
tion
of
one
otherpancreaticfunc-
tion
test-the
Secretin
stimula-
tion
test.
Secretin
is
a specific
pancretic
stimulant,
and
when
so
used,
with
a
tube
placed
so
that
pure
duodenal
contents
are
ob-
tained,
it
is
possibletoexamine
thisfluid
for
theconcentrations
of
trypsin,
lipaseandamylase,
and
to
accurately
diagnose
manydisorders
of
thepancreas.
Louis
Bauman
has
summarizedboth
the
methodsand
interpretations
of
thistest
in
an
excellent
mono-
graph,
"Diagnosisof
Pancreatic
Disease",publishedin
1949
by
J.
B.
Lippincott
Company.
How-
ever,
at
the
present
time
thistest
is
not
a
routine
laboratory
procedure.
Russian
Prisoners-
(Continued
fromPage
1)
the
militaryarsenal
and
sold
guns,
uniforms,
even
pianos
to
theRussian
civilians.BothDr.
Enzmanand
Mr.Ploogworked
as
farm
hands
at
one
time.Theyboth
learned
to
theirgrief
thatit
was
"bad
manners"
to
go
to
sleep
with
theirfeet
pointingtowardthe
sacred
picture
(icon)
in
the
cornerof
the
room.
Thesemen
talked
about
how
the
first
German
and
Austrian
prisoners
arriving
ina
large
Siberian
townfounda hugecrowd
wait-ingfor
them.The
Russianshad
been
toldby
their
government
that
the
prisoners
had
horns
on
their
heads.Dr.Enzman
stated
that
they
explained
the
absenceof
thehorns
by
telling
the
people
that
the
horns
hadto
be
sawed
off
so
that
steelhelmts
would
fit
but
that
thegirls
and
women
at
home
were"horned."Indiscussiong
the
common
Russian,
especially
the
farmer,
both
agreed
that
heis
good-natured,cruel,
ignorant,
hospitable
in
short,primitive.
"The
Russian
government
(no
matter
whatits
nature
may
be)is
despicable,"
states
Dr.Enzman."Policesupervision,oppression,
corruption,
cruelty-is
notpeculiar
to
the
Soviets
but
to all
Russian
governments.Conditions
do
not
seem
tohavechanged
since
1915.
Those
escapingtheRussian
world
today
seem
tofeel
the
sameway
we did.
It
is
like
stepping
outofa
dark,storm-swept
night
into
a
warm,lightedand
comfortable
room."
Do
formerRussianrisoners
hate
theRussians?
Rarely.Both
men
agreed
that
most
formerprisonerspity
them.They
seem
in-
capable
of
creating
adecentgovernmentoran
efficient
socialsystem
by
their
own
efforts.
How
did
these
men
come
toAmerica?
Mr.
Ploog
came
to
theUnited
States
in
1922
on
an
immigration
quotato live
withrelatives
here
in
Iowa.
Dr.Enzman'seventual
arrival
is
another
incredible
story
but
it
involvesservice
withthe
British
Army,
11
years
in
China,
etc.
Speaking
for
bothof them,
Dr.
Enzmansaid,
"Words
cannotdescribeour
thankfulness
and
appreciation
for
being
permitted
to
become
citizensof
the
greatest
country
on
earth.
Mr.Ploog
and
I
hope
that
we
havein
some
smallway
shown
ourappreciation
by
being
good
and
useful
membersofour
society-Mr.
Ploog,
a
farmer
and
I,a
teacher."
The
President
Chats
Thedawnof
the
New
Year,with
all
of
its
hidden
secrets,presents
a
challengeto
the
in-tellect
of
man.Seriousproblems
to
besolved,
disappointments
to
be
encountered
and
joysto
beex-
periencedwill
be
ours.
Yes,
1953
holds
for
each
of
usmore
secrets
than
has
any
of
thepast
years.
As
we
take
an
inventory
of
our
past,
we
readily
realize
that
with-
out
friends
our
presentefforts
would
be
futile-so
as anindi-
vidualor
as an
institution,
one
of
theprime
objectives
forthe
New
Year
would
be
the
widening
of
ourworldof
friends.DuringtheChristmas
vacationmuchworkwasaccomplished
atthe
college
by
constructinga
new
Pathologylaboratory
on
the
first
floor
of
the
college
building.This
new
beautiful
andefficient
lab-
oratory
will
not
only
provide
the
school
withanother
mostmodern
laboratorybut
allows
for
the
ex-
pansionof
theotherexistinglaboratories
of
the
college.
These
improvements
are
possible
throughthecontributions
of
Friends
of the
College.
If
Educa-
tion
isto
remain
on
its
present
level,
Friends
of
Education
will
be
responsibleby
their
generous
contributions
to
our
colleges
and
universities.
Figures
on
the
1952-53
Status
of
Colleges,
printed
in
the
NewYorkTimes,
December
14,
1952,
shows
that
deficits
persist
in
the
American
colleges
anduniversi-tiesastheenrollmentrises.
Thesurvey
further
pointsout
that
althoughthe
total
college
enroll-
menthas
gone
up
the
number
of
faculty
members
has
decreased.The
survey
further
states,"fi-
nancially,
the
collges
and
univer-sities
are
in
major
trouble.Tui-tion
rates
have
gone
up
year
af-
ter
year,andthe
endis
not
ins
i
g
h t."Americaneducation
leaders
are
disturbed
at
the
fi-
nancialplight
of
the
colleges."
"Appeals
tobusiness,
industry,
foundations,alumniandall
friends
of
higher
education
are
beingmade
bycollege
presidents.
Theycontend
that
the
institu-
tionsof
higher
learning
are
nec-
esaryifthe
democratic
way
of
life
is
to
continueto
flourishas
part
of
the
American
heritage."
Our
Colleges
of
Osteopathy
are
notexceptions
tothegeneral
conditions
astheyexist
in
the
other
institutions
of
higher
edu-
cation
throughout
thecountry.
Shall
not
everyOsteopathic
Physician
resolveto
make
more
Friendsfor
Osteopathy
in
1953
and
thus,
more
financialassist-
ance
for
our
Osteopathic
Col-
leges.
MayOsteopathic
Education
echo
from
thelips
of
everyOsteo-
pathic
P
h
y
s
ic i
a
n
throughout
1953.
dllPI1·-rlI·IIIIIILI-
CL-_--
C
--
__
C
__
__-
--
L--I_ __ I
I
 
THE
LOGBOOK
---------------·---~-------i----_--
.I
Dean's
Letter
Accentuatingthe negative
is
sometimes
the
mosteffectiveway
of
making
a
point.In conferringwithstudents
on
scholasticprob-
lems,
it
is
found
that
poor
studyhabits
are
moreresponsiblefor
low
grades
and
failuresthan
any
other
cause.Thefollowinghumorous
ex-
tract
from
a
recent
issue
of
Chemical and
Engineering
News
may
be
consideredmore
impres-
sive
than
anylengthy
serious
dissertation
on
studyhabits.
HOW
TO
FAIL
A
COURSE
Carl
Otto
of
theUniversity
of
Maine
sentusthe
following
list
of
13
easy
steps
to
failinga
coursein
chemistry.
He
remindsusalso
that
thereare
reputed
to
be
13
steps
to agallows.
1.
Be
absentfrequently.
Let
the
slightest
indisposition
keepyou
at
home.
Pamper
that tired
feeling.
Think
of
the
others-it
might
be
catching.
2.
When
attending
classmakea
dramatic
entrance
after
the
lecturebegins.The
instructor
will
thus
getacquaintedwith
you
sooner.
3.
Do
notstudy
the
assign-
ments.
The
instructor
disagreeswith
some
ofthe
text
anyway.In
fact,if
you
arenot
on
the
GI
Bill,why buy
thetexts.
4.
Postponedoinghomework
until
after
that
done
by
othershas
been
discussedin class.
The
timesavedmore
than
makesup
for
the
time
lost
on
prelims.
5.
Do
not
pay
attention
to
thefiguresand
curves
the
instructorputs
on
the
blackboard.
That
girl
last
night
had
better
ones
and
the
blind
date
tonightbetter
have.
6.
If
the
text
saystwo
certainreagents
give
a
white
precipitate
when
mixed,
but
theexperiment
producesa
blue
one,
do
not
ques-tion
why.It
is
just
a
chemys-tery.
In
fact,
why
botherwithlaboratory
when
the
resultsare
all
inthe
book.
Avoid
contradic-
tions.
7.
Do
not
attendlaboratoryat
ZbLe
log
Biook
The
Official
Publication
of
DESMOINES
STILL
COLLEGE
OF
OSTEOPATHY
&
SURGERY
Accepted
formailing
at
special
rates
of
postageprovided
for
in
Section
1103,
Act
of
October
3,
1917,
authorized
Feb.
3.
1923.
Entered
as
second
class
matter,
Feb-
ruary
3,
1923,
at
thepost
office
at
Des
Moines,
Iowa,
under
the
ActofAugust
24.
1912.
WENDELL
R.
FULLER
Editor
the
scheduledtime,
but
come
when
the instructor
is
not
both-eredby
other
students
and
you
canhavehisundivided
attention.
He
may
appreciate
alibis,espe-ciallyunique
ones.
8.
Do
notrecord
experiments
while
in
the
laboratory.
Wait
sev-
eral
weeks.
When
some
observa-tionshave
been
forgottenthe
recordwill
be
shorter.
Hand
in
your
reports
at
or
after
exmina-
tion
timewhen
theinstructor
is
too
busyto
read
them.
9.
Neverworkwithclean ap-
paratus.
Many discoveriesand
inventions
have
resulted
from
chance
impurities.
10.
Use
dice
to determinebest
answers
to
"true
andfalse"
and
"multiple
choice"
questions.
This
method
is
quick
and
givesa va-ried
pattern
of
answers.
A
crys-
tal
ballmay
be
betterforthe
"completion
type."
11.
Don't
review
old
prelims.Let
the
dead
past
lie
in
peace.
The
future
lies
in
pieces
anyway.
12.
Padthe
body
ofessay
type
questions
with
Lincoln'sGettys-
burg
Address
repeatedas
manytimesas
needed
to
give
impres-
sive
length.
The
beginningand
endshould
be
pertinent
to
the
subject
matter.
The
instructor
may
read
that
much.
13.
If
a
passing
grade
stillstares
you
inthe
face,you
are
hopelessly
intelligent.
Your
last
chance
is
to
study
all
night
be-
forethe
final
exam
and appear
there
bleary
eyed,
mentally
fag-
ged,
andbarely
awake.
Dr.
Moates
To
Texas
John
B.
Moates,
D.O.
John
B.
Moates,
D.O.,
until
re-
centlya
supervisor
in
theStill
College
Clinic
has
returned
to
his
home
inAbilene,
Texaswhere
he
intends
to
practise.
SurgeonsOppose
Fee-Splitting
TheAmerican
College
of
Os-
teopathic
Surgeons,
duringits
1952
ClinicalAssembly
during
October,
went
on
record
asbeing
definitely
opposed
to
"Fee-Split-
ting."
In the
premisesof
their
formal
resolution,
the
College
of
Surg-
eons
recites
that
the
patient
is
entitled
"to
full
knowledgeas
to
the
identity
of,
the
services
ren-
dered,
andthecharges
ofeach
physician
who
hasrenderedser-
vice"
and
that
thedoctor-patient
confidence
"is
materially
strengthened
by
frank
discussion
and full
understanding
as
to
the
nature
of
the
fees
charged."
Further,
fee-splitting
(secret
di-
vision)
"violates
all
rules
ofhon-
est
conduct
anddestroysthe
con-
fidenceof
the
publicin
the
doc-
tor
and
is
otherwise
againstthe
public
interest."
A
portion
of
the
resolution
follows:
"THEREFORE
BE
IT
RE-SOLVED
that
the
Ameican
Col-
legeof
OsteopathicSurgeons
de-
clares
itself
opposedto
the
fol-lowing
practices
as being
un-
ethical:(a) The
secret
divisionof
a
feebetweentwophysi-
cians.
(b)
Thedeception
of
a
patient
as
to
theopeatingsurg-
eon.
(c)
The
payment
ofa
refer-ring
physician
for
assist-
ance
during
an
operation,
withoutthe
knowledge
of
the
patient
(as to
thefact
and
asto
the
amount)orthe
payment
withthe
knowledgeof
thepatient,
of
an
amount
not
customary
or
reasonable
in
relation
to
the
service
rendered.
"BEIT
FURTHER
RE-SOLVED
that
the
American
Col-
lege
of Osteopathic
Surgeons
be-
lieves
that
ethicalrelations
be-
tween
patients
and
doctorsin
fi-nancial
transactions
shall
be
based
upon:
(a)
Each
physician
who
hasrendered
serviceto
the
patient
shall
bill
the
patient
directly
for
that
service.
(b)
If
the
GoverningBoard
of
the
Hospitalhasapproved
the
A
1950
graduate
of
Kansas
City
College
of'Osteopathy,
Dr.
Moates
interned
in
Detroit
Osteo-
pathicHospital,Detroit,
Michi-
gan,
before
joining
the
staff
in
DMSCOS
October
1,
1951.
Dr.
Moates
planned
tovisit
withhis
Mother
and
twochil-dren,
Shirley
Anne,
6,
andJohn
David,
4,
before
entering
prac-
tise.
Dr.Dr.
Moates'
address
is
1842-North
9th
Street,
Abilene,Texas.
rendering
of
combined
state-
ments,a
combined
statement
may
be
rendered
on
initial
billing
by
the
attending
surgeon,providing
it
is
itemized
as
follows:
1.
Name
of
each
doctor
2.
Services
rendered
3.
Individualcharges
4.
Combined
statements
shall
carry
the
following
paragraph
so
that
no
confusionmay
be
creat-
ed:
"This
statement
is
rendered
for
informationas
to
the
doctors
who
participated
in
yourcare
during
yourhospital
stay;the
services
rendered
by
each,and
thecharges
ofeach.All
pay-mentsare
to
be
made
direct
to
the
officeof eachdoctor
and
are
to
be
receipted
by
each
doctor."
(c)
Combined
or
jointstate-
ments
that
fail
toitemize
the
name
of
the
doctors,
the
services
renderedandtheamount
of in-dividual
chargesshall
be
consid-ered
unethical.
(d)
Any
other
procedure
or
methodof
billing
or
ofcollectingfeeswhichmay
result,
inten-tionallyor
otherwise,
in
the
pa-
tient
not
having
fullknowledge
as
to
the
fees charged,
the
originof suchchargesand
the
recipientof
the
moneys
involved,
shall
be
consideredunethical.
(e)
Surgeons
who
havea
reg-
ularassistant
at
operations
may
pay
himdirectly.When
theas-
sistant
has
referred
thepatient
to
the
operating
surgeon,
the
surgeonshallfollow
the
proced-
ure
as
outlined."The
College
of
Surgeons
then
outlined
theproceduresto
be
fol-
lowedby
that
group
in
advancingthe
principles
set
forth
before.This
entire
subjecthas
been
one
ofconsiderable
controversy
in
the
circles
of
the
several
schools
of
medicine,
andthe
foregoingoutlines
a
comprehensive
test
to
defineandguideallconcerned.
ATLAS
NEWS
Here's
anewsitemIreceived
from
a
little
bird(with
a
mous-
tache)-the
engagement
ofAn-
thony
W. Moscal
of Windsor,
On-
trio,
to
Miss
KathleenMcNamara
of
Limerick-the
spelling
iscor-
rect,
believe
me-Ireland.
Theywillwalk
the
aisleto
marital
bliss
this
coming
April.
Con-
gratulations
to
a
fine
young
cou-
ple.
Another
Atlas
man
joiningthe
great
brotherhoodofhonored
husbands.
December
7,
1952,
saw
there-
turn
of
ourwanderingexternes-
Wewelcome
back
Jorgensen,
Wise,
Walters,
Woofenden,
Petty,Hatchitt,
Taylor,
Blackwell,
andWilcher.
Atthe
same
timethe
abovemen
returned
to
DesMoines,
RichardStahlmanand
Lee
Walk-
er
leftforsimilar
six
monthsexternships
at
Columbusand(Continued
on
Page
4)

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