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DMSCO Log Book Vol.35 1957

DMSCO Log Book Vol.35 1957

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PUBLISHED
MONTHLY
BY
THE
DES
MOINES
STILL
COLLEGEOFOSTEOPATHY
&
SURGERY
Vol.
35
JANUARY,
1957
Number
1
Big
"D"-Dallas
That
IsAwaits
61st
AOA
Meeting
Convention
Committee
PreparingProgram
CHICAGO
(AOA)-The
61st
annual
con-
vention
of
the AmericanOsteopathic
Asso-ciation
is
scheduled
to
convene
at
Dallas
on
July
15,
1957,
and
runthroughJuly
19.
TheBoardof
Trustees
will
meet
in
ad-vanceof
the
convention
in
that
city
com-
mencing
July
9,
while
the
House
of
Dele-
gates
willopen
its
sessions
on
July
14,
A
tri-partite
hotel
arrangement
isbeing
firmedupwith
the
new
Statler,
Baker
andAdolphus
hotels.
Program
Chairman
Neil
R.
Kitchen,
De-
troit,
announces
that
the program
forthe
annual
conventionwill
consist
of
generalmorningmeetingsand
threeseparate
ses-sionseach
afternoon.
Technique
andteach-
ing
sessionsand
symposium
panels
willcomprise
the
concurrentafternoon
seg-
ments
of
the
program.
Dr.
William
Baldwin,
Jr.,
Philadelphia,
was
appointed
as
the
third
member
of
the
convention
committee
on
program.
He
will
be
Program
Chairman
in
1959
when
the
AOA
is scheduledto
meet
in
Chicago.
Dr.
Baldwin,
togetherwith
Dr.
Richard
0.
Brennan,Houston,
1958
program
chairman,
and
Dr.Kitchen
compose
thecommittee
on
program
for
the
1957
convention.
New
Public
Health
Service
Program
Door-to-Door
Family
Survey
CHICAGO
(AOA)-A
new
Public
Health
Service
programunderthe
directorship
of
Forrest
E.
Linder,Ph.D.,tosurvey
the
nature
and
extent
of
illnessand
disability
in
the
population
each
year,was
an-
nounced
recently
by
the
U.S.
Department
ofHealth,EducationandWelfare.
The
year-by-year
survey,authorized
by
the
past
Congress,also
willinclude
data
on
medical
services
receivedby
the
illand
disabled.The
last
previous
Federalsur-
veyof
this
typewasin
1936.
PHSplansto
use
scientific,
door-to-door
samplingtechniques,
similar
to those
de-
veloped
by
publicopinionpolls,
toobtain
accurateinformation
on
the
amount,
dis-
tribution,
andeffects
of
illnessand
dis-
ability,andthe
servicesreceived
because
ofsuchconditions.
If
and
when
you
change
your
address,
please
notifythe
LOGBOOK
promptly.
ChildbirthProgram
Begins
January
24th
TheDes
Moines
Still
Collegeof
Osteo-
pathy
and
Surgery
is
again
presenting
its
series
of
freeinformaldiscussions
con-
cerning pregnancy
and
thecare
of
the
new-
born
infant.
Thesessions
are
conducted
by
Dr.
J.
DudleyChapman,
Instructor
in
Ob-
stetrics.
Dr.
J.
Dudley
Chapman
Themain
purpose
of
theseries
is,
through
education,to
makepregnancymore
com-
fortable
and
pleasant
to
the
expectantmother.
The
topics
discussed
inthe
six
lectures
will
includecourse
introductionandthe
rea-
sons
for
prenatal
care;
how
thepregnancy
gets
started
and
thechanges
in
mother
andbaby;
how
the
baby
is
borne;
what
a
mod-
erndelivery
roomlookslikeand
an
ex-
planation
of
theequipmentused;
howan
expectant
mother
can
learnrelaxation
methods
to
make
her
labor
more
comfort-able;
and,
inconclusion,
thecare
of
the
new
baby
after
it
leavesthehospital.
Thediscussion
sessions
commenced
Thurs-
day
evening,
January
24,
at
7:30p.
m.
in
room
305
of
the
Clinic
Building
at
722
Sixth
Avenue.Anyone
wishing
to
enroll,including
ex-
pectant
fathers,
in
the
freeseriesmay
call
theObstetrical
Clinic,
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathy
and
Surgery,
722
Sixth
Avenue,
PhoneATlantic
8-7241.
'56
Graduate
Delivers
First
'57
Baby
Dr.George
Evans,
DMSCOS,
'56,
de-
livered
the
first
Tulsa,
Oklahoma
baby
of
1957.
The
eight
pound
four
andone-half
ounce
baby
girl
wasborn
at
the
Oklahoma
OsteopathicHospital
at
3:40
a.
m.;
an
hour
and
a
half
earlierthan
any
otherinfant.
Osteopathic
Cranial
Association
Meets
atStill
College
The
Third
ClinicalConferenceconducted
by
the OsteopathicCranial
Associationwasheld
at
DMSCOS
January
21-25,1957.
Theconference
program
hadas
its
general
sub-
ject,
"Common
MotorProblems."
Monday,
January
21,
1957,
short
lecturesweregivenbymembers
of
the
Staff
of
DMSCOS
emphasizingthe
development,
anatomy
and
physiology
of
thenervous
sys-
tem.Tuesday,Management
and
Therapy
for
Motor
Problemswas
discussed.
Cerebral
Palsy
was
considered
Wednesday;andThursday,Cerebro-Vascularaccidents
wasdiscussed.
Eveningmeetings
consisted
of
a
FunNight,
aTechniquesession,and
abanquetwithDr.True
B.
Eveleth
as
guest
speaker
on
the
subject,"ThePlace
of
Osteopathy
in
AmericanHealth."
Friday
morning
H.
I.
Magoun
talkedbriefly
abouttheResearch
Program.
Pre
Natal
ClassesGain
TV
and
RadioCoverage
Daher
B.
Rahi,
senior
student
from
Leb-
anon,
appeared
on
KSO
radio
andKRNT-
TV
in Des
Moines,
Iowa,
January
17,1957
accompanied
by
Mrs.
Janet
Crum.Theydiscussed
the
significanceandobjectives
of
the
pre-natal
classes
whichhavebeen
pre-sented
by
the
obstetricaldepartment
of
Still
College
for
the
past
2/2
years.
Oklahoma
Osteopathic
Hospital
Gets
Federal
Aid
forExpansion
CHICAGO(AOA)
-The
Public
Health
Service
recentlyawarded
its
first
grants
under
anew
three-year
$90,000,000
pro-
gram
tohelp
build
moreand
better
medical
researchfacilities.
The
grants
wentto
six
hospitals
and
medical
schools.
Almost
half
a
million
dol-
lars
in
federal
aid
went
to
Tulsa's
Okla-
homaOsteopathicHospital,
with
the
ap-
proval
of
the
State
HealthDepartment.This
grant
includes
$259,143
for
a
60-bed
generaladdition
to be
built
at
an
esti-
matedcost
of
$647,859;
$79,960
for
anout-
patient
department
expected
tocost
$159,-
920,
and
$8,450
for
a
26-bed
chronic
dis-
eases
wing,expected
to
cost
$176,9081.
Congressset
up
theprogram
last
sum-
mer
tohelppublicand
privateinstitutions
buildand
equip
facilities
for
research
in
medicine,
osteopathy,
dentistry.
Public
in-
stitutions
each
put
up
half
the
cost
of
the
construction
projects.
 
THE
LOGBOOK
The
President
Chats
The
crystal
ball
for
1957
holds unknown
surprises
and
heartaches
for
all
of
us.
How-
ever,
we
must
enter
the
new
year
with
op-
timism.
The
past
year
has
beena
good
year, our
collegeshave
all
made
tremendous
educationaladvances,more
research
than
everbefore
has
come
from the
institutions
of
Osteopathic
education.
More
recognitionhas
been
given
theprofession
on
the
Fed-
eral
level
and the
young people
composing
our
student
bodies
are
of such acaliber
that
they
would
be
a
credit
to
any
institu-
tion
of
higher
educationin
the country.
The
greatest
weakness
of
the
past
yearhas
been
the
lackof
financial support,
from
the
publicand
from theprofession,
to
ourcolleges.
Educationalprogress
is
costly;
yes,
very
costly,and
due'to-various
factors this
col-
lege
hasnot
been able to keep
the
addi-
tionalcontributionssufficient
enough
dur-ing
1956
to
balance
ourbudget.In
fact,
1956
was
a
year
that
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathyand
Surgery
operated
at
a
great
loss. While
operating
in
the
red
is
not
un-
usual
for
any
institution
of
higher
edu-cation,
it
isacondition
that
we
do
not
liketo
have
exist.
Student
tuition
paysapproximately
one-
third
of
the
cost
of
thestudent's
education
per
year.
The
balance
must
come
from
so-
ciety.
Can
we
not musterthe
forces
of
so-
ciety
so
that
more
contributions
will
be
forthcoming
to
Osteopathic
Educationdur-
ing
1957?
Thisis
our
great
challenge!
We
are
deeply
appreciative
to
all
who
have
contributed
to
OsteopathicEducationduring
this
past
year.Withoutyour
help
our educational
program
would have
suf-fered.
While
we
areproud ofour
school,
we
arenot satisfied.
1957
must
see
continued
growth
and expansion.
To
allalumni
and
friends
of
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathyand
Surgery
we
extendoursincerest
wishes
for
a
HappyandProsperous
New
Year.
Visitorsfor
Month
ofDecember,
1956
William
L. Chu,
D.O.
Dallas,
Texas
..............
DMS
'52
WilliamE. Meaney,
D.O.
Detroit,
Michigan
.........
DMS
'52
Vance
E.
Walters,
D.O.
Flint,
Michigan
............
DMS
'53
JohnUrse,
D.O.
Columbus,
Ohio
............
DMS
'55
EmilBraunschweig,
D.O.
San
Diego,
California
......
DMS
'37
John
A.
Link,
D.O.
Dubuque,Iowa
..............
DMS
'42
Theron
D.
Crews,
D.O.
Gonzales,
Texas
............
DMS
'36
Subscribeto Health
(
Congress
Receives
Bills
That
Would
Assist
Students
Senator
J.
W.
Fulbright
has
once
againintroduced
two
bills
to
aidand
assiststu-
dents
seeking
higher
education.
The
bills
first
introduced
last
April,
were
not
acteduponbefore
adjournment.
It
is
hoped
Con-
gress
will
act
on
them duringthis
session.
Senator
Fulbright
considers
these
bills
vitalto the
developmentof
our
educational
in-
stitutions,
and
to
the general
educational
standards
of
our
country.
The
first
bill would
allow
anadditional
income
tax
exemption
for
a
taxpayer
or
aspouse, ora dependentchild
under
twen-
ty-three
years
of
age,
who
is a
full-time
student
at
an
educational
institution
above
the
secondary
level.
Theexemptionmay
be
claimedby
thetaxpayer
himself,
or
on
accountof a spouse
or
a
dependent
child
undertheage
of
23,
who
is
iil
attendance
on
a
full-timebasis
at
aneducationalinsti-tution
above
the
secondarylevel.The
second
bill
would allow
a
taxpayer,
who
is a
student
in
an
institution
of
higherlearning
to deduct expenses
for
books,
tui-tion,
fees,
andothersuppliesnecessary
to
the
coursesof
instruction
in whichhe
is
enrolled.This
bill
is
primarily
designed
to
assist
those
students
who
work
their
own
way
through
college,
and
it
would
applyto
bothfull-time
and
part-time
students,whetherself-supporting
or
supported
by
outside
sources.
The
continually
rising
costsofa
college
education,ofcourse,
varies,
but
it
is
rea-
sonableto
estimatethe averagecostat
$1,500
peryear,
or
roughly$6,006
for
a
4-year
college
education.The costof
the
morespecializedcoursesin
science
and
medicine
quiteoften
is muchmore
thanthis,
and
yet the
parent,
or the
individual
himself,
receives onlya
$600
a
yearper-
sonal
tax
exemption.Consequently,
there
is
no
incentiveprovidedin
our
tax
laws
for
one
to
pursue
andeducationalgoal.
There has
been
for
decades
a
continualand serious
deterioration
in
the
generalquality
of oureducation.
More
recently,
we
have
read
and
heard
much
about
the
mountingshortage
of
trained
engineers
and
scientists
in
theUnited
States.
It
isin-
teresting
to
note
that
Universities
and tech-
nical
institutions
inSoviet
Russia
are
graduating
engineers
in
numbers
some
twoanda
half
times
greater
thanare
similar
institutions
in
theUnited
States
where
we
are
now
training
only
one-half
the
requirednumber
of
engineers
and
scientists.In
the
decade
1950-1960,
the
SocietUnionis
ex-
pected
to
produce
1,200,000
trained
engi-
neers
and
scientistsas
comparedto
our
900,000.
In
the category
of
engineers
alone,
the
Sovietshave
multipliedthe
number
trained
tenfold
since
1930,
whenrecords
show
they
had
41,000
engineers.
This
sit-
uation
is
allthe
more
critical
because
of
the
demands,
not
only
of
industry,
but
of
nationalsecurity.Inaddition
to
theseconsiderations,
publicand
privateeducational
institutions
face
a
precarious
future.
They
areessential
to
thepreservation
ofour wayof life.Thesebills,
if
enacted,
would
give
them
some
as-
sistance
and enable
them
toaccept
addi-
New
Film
Series
Airs
Medico-Legal
Problems
"Medical
Witness"
Available
on
Loan
CHICAGO
(AOA)-The
first
of
a
series
of
six
films
on
medico-legal
problemspre-pared
by
the
American
Medical
Association
and
theAmericanBarAssociation
hasjust
had
its
premiere
showing.The
film, en-
titled
THE
MEDICAL
WITNESS,
depicts
the
right
and
wrongmethodsof
a
physi-
cian
testifying
in
a
personal
injury
case.The
series
is
being
producedbyTheWil-
liam
S.
Merrell
Company,
Cincinnati,
ethicalpharmaceutical
manufacturer,
asa
service
to
thelegal
and
healing
arts
professions.THE
MEDICAL
WITNESS
is
available
on
loan
for
professionalmeetings
of the
AOA
divisional
societies,
hospitalsandosteopathic
colleges.
To
obtainthe
film,
direct
a
request
with
a
suggesteddateand
an
alternatate
tefor
the
showingto
John
B.
Chewning,
M.D.,
Director
of
ProfessionalRelations,
The
William
C.
Merrill
Co.,
Cin-
cinnati
15.
Copies
of
other
films
to
be
produced
in
thisseries
will
be
available
when
com.
pleted.Thestory-lineprojectschallengeandlimitless
scope
coveringa
wide
variety
of
health
work.Viewers
see
actual
health
workers
doing
their
actual
jobs.
The
film
covers occupations
that
require
little
or
nospecial
training
to
those
requiring
years
of
graduate
study.
It
may
be
borrowed
from the
AOA
mere-lyby
writingthe
Divisionof
J
&
PS,specifying
a
date
andan
alternate
date.
The
film
will
be
sent
collectand
must
be
returned
prepaid.
(It
is
ourrecommendation
that
the
pro-
fessionutilize
this
excellent
film
to
full
advantage.
We
also
urge
state
societies
to
seriouslyconsider purchasing
a
print
of
their
own.)
Eds.
High-Fidelity
Stethoscope
Developed
in
London
CHICAGO
(AOA)-A-
new
high-fidelity
amplifying
stethoscope
for
doctors
has
beendeveloped
bya
physicist
anda
surgeon
of
King's
College
Hospital,
London.
King's
College
Hospital,
in
releasing
thestory,
pointedout
that
the
developersof
theinstrument
soughtimprovement
over
the
ordinaryamplifying
electronic
stethoscope
which
theystated
are
of
little
value
be-
cause
they
distort
some
frequencies
of
heart,
lung
and
joint
sounds.The
new
device
produces
no
background
noise.
The
instrument
hasfrequency
con-
trols
that
can
be
manipulated
to
bring
out
sounds
that
might
otherwise
be
masked.Outsidenoisescan
be
cut
outwhena
doc-
tor
is
listening
to
faint
foetal
heart
sounds,
for
instance.
The
device
may
be
used
to
advantageby physicianswith
good
hearing
as wellas
by physicianswith impairedhearing.tional
students
who
can
pay
their
own
way.Thus,
thebills
would
have
a
further
bene-
ficial
effectupon
the
finances
of
our
fine
educational
institutions.
 
Dean's
Letter
Midyearactivities
now
prevail
in mostcollegesand
universities.
Many
students aremakingplans
for
the continuation
or
con-
clusion of
their
pre-professionalstudies
prior
to
admission
to
osteopathic and
med-
ical
schools.
For
the
benefit and guidance of all
who
read the
Log
Book,
Doctors
of
Osteopathy,
campus
advisors,
students,
and
others,
it
is
feltthat
the
current regulations
for
admis-
sion
asthey
appear
in
our catalog
should
be
printed
in
this
issue
for
refresher
pur-
poses. The
catalog
is
availableuponrequest
to anyone
who
has
need
of
it.
Admission
Requirements
The requirements
for
admission
to
the
Des
Moines
Still
College
ofOsteopathy
and
Surgery
are:
1.
A
minimumof
three years
of college
training
in
a
college
or university
ac-
creditedby a regional educational
as-
sociation
is
required
for
admission
to
professional
education in an
Osteo-
pathiic
college.
2.
The Des Moines
Still
College
of Oste-
opathy
and
Surgery
requires three
years (ninety
semesterhours),
amongwhich
shall
be
included:
6
Semester hours
English
(includ-
ing
composition
or
rhetoric)
8
Semester hours
Biology
(or
Zo-
ology)
8
Semester hours
General
Physics
8
Semester hours
Generaland In-
organic Chemistry
6-8
Semester hoursOrganic
Chemis
try
54
Semester hours Electives
The
pre-osteopathic
student
should
planhis
course
of
study
to include
at
least
theminimum
of
subject credits
specified above.
Biology
credit may
be
earned
in
either
gen-
eral
biology or
zoology.
Credit
in
botany
is
acceptable
only when
the
student
hasadditionally
at
least four
hours
of
credit
in
general
biology
or
zoology. The
generalchemistrycreditmay
include
analyticalchemistry,
if
in
addition to
a
full
course
in inorganic chemistry.The organic
chem-
istry
should
be
a complete course in
thechemistry
of
bothaliphaticand aromatic
compounds,
includinglaboratory.Electives
should
be
selected
on
a
cultural
rather
than
scientific
basis,
in
history,lit-erature,
public
speaking,
modern
language,
economics,
political
science,
psychologyandphilosophy. Courses in basic
and
abnormalpsychology
are
strongly
advised.
Person-
ality
theory,survey
of clinical psychology,andpsychological
testing
will
be
useful
in
preparation
of
understanding
of
mentaldisorders.
It is
not
advised
that
thestudent
elect courses in
human anatomy, bacteri-
ology,
physiology,
embryology,
or
biochem-
istry
asthese subjects
must
be
repeated
in
the professional
course and
the
elective
time
and
effort
of
thepre-professional
stu-
dent
is
better
spent
in
auxiliary
study.
3.
Applicants with mental
or physical
handicaps
which
prevent
the
satisfac-tory
completion of all
prescribed
Pictured
at
leftis
one
of
the
Des
Moines
area
hockey
teams
coached
by
Dr.
Fitz,
third
from
right
bottom
row.
Des
lloines
Is
Alive
With
Hockey
Under the supervision
of
Dr.
Erie
W.
Fitz, the
DesMoines
Amateur
HockeyClub
was
formed. The club
is hopingtopromotethe
sport
ofhockey
in
DesMoines
for
spectators
and
players
alike.
Practice
sessions
have
been
held
for
the
Pee
Wee'sof
Des
Moines
with
experiencedcoaching
led
by
Dr.
Fitz.
Teams
are
composed
of
playersfromStill
College,
Drake University,andother
boys
livingin
town.Also
teams
from
Wa-terloo,
Fort
Dodge
andOmaha have
come
down
toplayin
the
league.Games
are
played
at
theVeterans
Me-
morialbuildingprecedingthe
Central
HockeyLeague Contests.The
playersparticipating
from Still
are:
Saul Shapiro,Conrad
Pearl,
Robert
Corn-well, Roger
Senty,John
Olszewski,
Law-renceGoldman,
and John
Harten.
Hockeyis
one
of
the
most enjoyable
spec-
tator
sports
to watch,
so
let's
all
get
out
to
the next
game
and
cheer
the teams
on.
It
will
be
anevening
well
spent.courses
of
study includinglaboratoryand
clinical
courses are not
accepted
for
admission.
Admissions
aretenta-
tivepending physicalexamination.
4.
Applicationform
for
admission must
be
sent
to
office
of
Director
of
Admis-sions.
5.
Application
must
be
accompaniedby
a
recent
photograph
of
the applicant
and
the
matriculation
fee
of
$15.00
which
is
not refundable.
6.
Applicant
must
give
three
references:an OsteopathicPhysician; advisor
or
instructor
in biology
in
the
preosteo-pathic
school;
and
one
other
reputablecitizen. Relatives
should
not
be
nam-
ed
as references.
7.
Applicant
must presenttranscripts
of
creditsfrom
ALL
schools
whose cred-
its
aretoapplytoward
admission
(transcriptsmust
be
sent directly
to
theDirector
of
Admissionsfrom
the
Registrar
of each
school).
8.
Average
grades
on
transcripts
sub-
(Continued
on
Page
4)
Dr.
Beutner
Visits
Germany
DoctorReinhard
H.
Beutner, member
of
the
Department
of
Physiologyand
Phar-
macology
of
the
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathy
and
Surgery,
spent
two
and
one-half weeksof
his Christmasvacation
visiting
in
Germany
and
at
the
University
of Kiel.
Prior
tohis
trip
DoctorBeutner
commu-
nicatedwithmany
German
physiologists
regarding
the research
project
that
he
is
investigating
at
Des Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathy and Surgery,under a
grant
from the UnitedStates
Public
Health
Serv-
ice.
Doctor Beutner lectured
in
the
Physi-
ology
Institute
at
the University
of
Kiel.
Doctor
Beutner's
research
project
at
Des
Moines
Still
College
of
Osteopathy
and
Surgery
is concerning
the
electrogenesis
of
the transmembrane.
This
past
month
the
NationalHealth
Institute
of
the
United
States
Public
Health
Service
enlarged
its
present
$10,000.00
a
year grant
by a
supple-
mentary
grant
of
$3,975.00.
Mrs.
Beutner
will
remain
in
Germany
visiting
old
friends
and
relatives
for thenext
six weeks.
Select
Staff
for
Scientific
Societies
Scientific
societies
listed the
following
faculty
members
of
D.M.S.C.O.S.
for
theyear
1957.
American
Men
of
Science:
Drs.
R.
H.
Beutner,
Wm.
F:
Hewitt,
Jen-
YahHsie,
A.
E.
A.
Hudson,
B.
E.
Laycock,
E,.
R.
Minnick,
S.
D.
Miroyannis,
E.
F.
Peters,
J.
B:
Shumaker,
R.A.
Tolman, and
R.K.
Wolfer.
IowaAcademy
of
Science:
Drs.
Harry
Elmets,
E.
V.
Enzmann,
Wmn.
F.
Hewitt
(Fellow),
R.
B.
Juni,
H.
J.
Ket-
man,
E.
R.
Minnick,
S.
D.
Miroyannis (Fel
low),
J.
B.
Shumaker,
and
R.
K.
Wolfer(Fellow).
Sigma
Xi:
(National Honorary
Societyof
Physiological
and Biological
Sciences.)
Drs.
Wm.
F. Hewitt, Jen-Yah
Hsie,
S.
D
Miroyannis,
W.
Nusser,
R.
A.
Tolman,
and
R.
K.
Wolfer.
_
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