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Media Myths - Making Sense of the Debate over Media Ownership (Thierer-PFF)

Media Myths - Making Sense of the Debate over Media Ownership (Thierer-PFF)

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Published by Adam Thierer
Are media companies in this country too big? How big is "too big"? Is the media diverse enough and competitive enough today? And what relationship, if any, does media size have to the health of our democracy? These are the questions Adam Thierer, Director of The Progress & Freedom Foundation's Center for Digital Media Freedom, explores in "Media Myths: Making Sense of the Debate over Media Ownership."

In this book, Thierer challenges head-on media critics and their claims that we live in a world of a media monopoly. "Contrary to what some media critics claim, to the extent there was ever a 'Golden Age' of media in America , we are living in it today," he argues.

Thierer also debunks the arguments in favor of media ownership limits. "Such rules do little to encourage increased media diversity and competition," he says. "Indeed, more often than not, they thwart important new developments that could enhance media diversity and competition." Citizens will be better off without such regulations, Thierer argues, because their private actions and preferences will have a greater bearing in shaping media markets than arbitrary federal regulations.

"No matter how large any given media outlet is today, it is ultimately just one of hundreds of sources of news, information, and entertainment that we have at our collective disposal," Thierer says. "It is just one voice in our contemporary media cacophony, shouting to be heard above the others. Information and entertainment cannot be monopolized in a free society, especially in today's world of media abundance."
Are media companies in this country too big? How big is "too big"? Is the media diverse enough and competitive enough today? And what relationship, if any, does media size have to the health of our democracy? These are the questions Adam Thierer, Director of The Progress & Freedom Foundation's Center for Digital Media Freedom, explores in "Media Myths: Making Sense of the Debate over Media Ownership."

In this book, Thierer challenges head-on media critics and their claims that we live in a world of a media monopoly. "Contrary to what some media critics claim, to the extent there was ever a 'Golden Age' of media in America , we are living in it today," he argues.

Thierer also debunks the arguments in favor of media ownership limits. "Such rules do little to encourage increased media diversity and competition," he says. "Indeed, more often than not, they thwart important new developments that could enhance media diversity and competition." Citizens will be better off without such regulations, Thierer argues, because their private actions and preferences will have a greater bearing in shaping media markets than arbitrary federal regulations.

"No matter how large any given media outlet is today, it is ultimately just one of hundreds of sources of news, information, and entertainment that we have at our collective disposal," Thierer says. "It is just one voice in our contemporary media cacophony, shouting to be heard above the others. Information and entertainment cannot be monopolized in a free society, especially in today's world of media abundance."

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Published by: Adam Thierer on May 06, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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MakingSenseoftheDebateOverMediaOwnership
Adam D.Thierer
The Progress & Freedom Foundation
is a market-oriented think tank that studies the digital revolution and its implications for public policy. Its mission is to educate policymakers, opinionleaders and the public about issues associated with technological change, based on a philosophy of limited government, free markets and civil liberties. Established in 1993, it is a private, non-profit,non-partisan organization supported by tax-deductible donations from corporations, foundations,and individuals. PFF does not engage in lobbying activities or take positions on legislation.
1401 H Street, NW Suite 1075 • Washington, DC 20005phone: 202-289-8928 • facsimile: 202-289-6079 • www.pff.org
 
 
MEDIA MYTHS
MAKING SENSE OF THE DEBATE OVERMEDIA OWNERSHIP
By:Adam D. ThiererDirector, Center for Digital Media FreedomThe Progress & Freedom Foundation
 
 
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 559 Nathan Abbott Way,Stanford, California 94305, USA.
Copyright 2005Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: PendingISBN: PendingAll Rights Reserved by The Progress & Freedom FoundationNo part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying,recording or otherwise—without the permission of The Progress & Freedom Foundation1401 H Street, NW, Suite 1075, Washington, DC 20005202.289.8928,
www.pff.org 
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