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Clyde Passenger Steamer - 02 - Pages 042 - 086

Clyde Passenger Steamer - 02 - Pages 042 - 086

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Published by Clyde Steamers
Williamson’s Clyde Passenger Steamer - Part 02 - CHAPTER II - SUCCESSORS TO THE 'COMET' - CHAPTER III - EXCURSIONS, ENTERPRISES AND DISASTERS
Williamson’s Clyde Passenger Steamer - Part 02 - CHAPTER II - SUCCESSORS TO THE 'COMET' - CHAPTER III - EXCURSIONS, ENTERPRISES AND DISASTERS

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Published by: Clyde Steamers on Mar 26, 2010
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10/25/2011

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CHAPTER
II
SUCCESSORS
TO
THE
"COMET"
WHEN
the
"Comet"
was
wrecked,
Henry
Bell
was
on
his
way
to
Glasgow
to
make
arrangements
with
subscribers
for
the
buildingof
a
new
and
more
powerful
boat
for
the
West
Highland
trade.
So
rapidly
had
events
marched,
that
in
the
space
of
eight
years
the
pioneer
steamer
had
become
antiquated,
and
was
being
pushed
from
the
waters
by
newerand
more
powerful
rivals.
The
second
steamboat
on
the
Clyde
was
the
"
Elizabeth."
She
was
also
built
by
John
Wood,
and
to
judge
from
an
advertisement
in
the
Glasgow
Chronicle
of
3rd
April,
1813,
she
appears
to
have
met
with
immediate
suc-
cess.
That
advertisement
intimated
that
''the
proprietors
ofthe
'
Elizabeth
'
passage
steam-
boat
are
happy
to
inform
the
public
that
for
their
accommodation
there
will
be
another
boat
ready
in
the
course
of
a
few
weeks,
when
one
will
start
from
Glasgow
and
one
from
Greenock
everymorning,
and
return
the
same
evening."
The
"Elizabeth
"was
transferred
to
Liverpool
in
1814.
 
SUCCESSORS
TO
THE
<
COMET'
23
The
"Clyde"
being-
next
in
the
list,
must
have
been
the
other
boat
referred
to
in
the
foregoingadvertisement.
She
was
re-named
the
"Gourock"
in
1823,
the"
Lord
Byron"
in
1825,
and
the
"George
IV."
in
1826,
and
was
broken
up
in
1828.
Judging
from
the
records
of
the
early
steam-
boats,
re-christening
seems
to
have
been
very
common.
No
reason
is
stated,
but
possibly
the
device
was
necessary
to
hide
identity
in
those
experimental
days.
The
"
Glasgow,"
built
in
the
same
year,
was
supplied
with
machinery
by
Anderson
&
Camp-
bell,
of
Greenock,
under
the
superintendence
of
Henry
Bell.
The
engines
proved
a
failure,
and
by
involving
Bell
in
much
litigation,
con-
tributed
seriously
to
his
financial
embarrass-
ments.
New
engines
were
substituted
by
James
Cook,
of
Tradeston,
and
they
seem
to
have
given
satisfaction.
This
was
the
first
steamer
placed
on
the
Largs
trade.
In
the
following
year
(1814)
no
fewerthan
nine
steamers
were
launched.
They
were
the
"Morning
Star"
and
"
Inveraray
Castle,"
by
John
Wood,
Port-Glasgow;
the
"Trusty"
and
the
"Marjory,"
by
Archibald
MacLachlan,
Dumbarton;
the
"Princess
Charlotte"
and
"
Prince
of
Orange,"
by
James
Munn,
of
Greenock;
the
"Duke
of
Argyle,"
by
Martin,
Port-Glasgow;
the
"Oscar,"
by
Smart,
of
Dundee;
and
the
"
Industry,"
by
William
Fyfe,
of
Fairlie.
Most
students
of
Clyde
river
steamer
lore
 
24
THE
CLYDE
PASSENGER
STEAMER
are
more
or
less
familiar
with
the
fact
that
Fairlie's
reputation
for
shipbuilding
originated
in
the
constructionof
a
tradingsteamer,
not
of
a
racing
yacht.
It
is
not
so
well
known,
however,
that
had
the
William
Fyfe,
who
founded
the
yard
just
about
a
hundred
years
ago
not
been
passionately
determined
to
be
a
yacht
builder,
and
nothing
else,
the
destiny
of
the
now
world-
renowned
yacht-building
yard
might
have
been
different
Nay,
more;
but
for
the
enthusiasm
of
this
WilliamFyfe
for
boats
of
pleasure,
rather
than
for
the
ships
of
commerce,
much
of
the
shipbuilding
that
is
now
carried
on
above
Greenock,
might
have
been
conducted
on
theforeshore
of
Largs
and
Fairlie.
The
"
Industry,"
which
was
builtat
Fairlie
in
1814
by
William
Fyfe,the
grandfather
of
the
present
famous
Fairlie
yacht
designer
and
builder,
was
the
seventh
river
steamer
to
be
constructed
on
the
Clyde,
and
she
earned
the
distinction
of
being
the
oldest
steamer
in
the
world
before
she
was
broken
up.
Mr.
Fyfe
built
the
"
Industry,"
with
oak
grown
in
his
nativeparishof
Kilbirnie,
for
a
small
syndicate
of
far-seeing
speculators
belonging
to
Beith.
So
well
pleased
were
these
gentlemen
with
the
"
Industry"
that
they
would
gladly
have
ad-
vanced
Mr.
Fyfe
money
on
easy
terms
for
the
purpose
of
equipping
his
yard
at
Fairlie
for
the
construction
of
trading
vessels
more
par-
ticularly
vessels
like
the
"
Industry."
They
would
give
him
neither
help
nor
countenance,

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