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USA TODAY Collegiate Case Study: Cybercrime

USA TODAY Collegiate Case Study: Cybercrime

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Published by USA TODAY Education
Computer crime (also referred to as cybercrime, e-crime or hi-tech crime) can be classified into the following categories:

• Content related crime - child pornography and criminal copyright infringement.
• Traditional crimes committed by means of a computer - fraud and theft.
• Attacks on computers and computer systems – hacking, pharming and phishing.

Those engaging in illegal activities online often have unlimited resources, time, and in most cases motivation, requiring businesses and government agencies to invest significant time and resources to upgrade their security programs to battle
the hacker. As soon as a new protocol is developed and announced, it seems that hackers have it figured out, and a more elaborate design must be developed. A 2006 FBI estimate pegged the total cost of cybercrime to businesses above $67
billion. This case study will explore the different ways that cybercrime can affect students. It will also raise awareness of the broader implications of cybercrime for the economy and national security.
Computer crime (also referred to as cybercrime, e-crime or hi-tech crime) can be classified into the following categories:

• Content related crime - child pornography and criminal copyright infringement.
• Traditional crimes committed by means of a computer - fraud and theft.
• Attacks on computers and computer systems – hacking, pharming and phishing.

Those engaging in illegal activities online often have unlimited resources, time, and in most cases motivation, requiring businesses and government agencies to invest significant time and resources to upgrade their security programs to battle
the hacker. As soon as a new protocol is developed and announced, it seems that hackers have it figured out, and a more elaborate design must be developed. A 2006 FBI estimate pegged the total cost of cybercrime to businesses above $67
billion. This case study will explore the different ways that cybercrime can affect students. It will also raise awareness of the broader implications of cybercrime for the economy and national security.

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Published by: USA TODAY Education on Mar 26, 2010
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01/23/2013

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C o llegiat eCaseS tu d y
THE NATION ’S NEW S PAPER
 www.usatodaycollege.com
© Copyright 2008 USATODAY, a division of Gannett Co., Inc. All rights reserved.
NATOto study defenseagainst cyberattacks
By Jim Michaels.....................................................................................5
Cybercrime arrests by FBI‘a tiny drop in the bucket’
By
Brian Acohido
.....................................................................................3
Security experts say RockPhish widening net
By Jon Swartz.....................................................................................4
Critical inquiry
Discussion and future implications.....................................................................................7
Computer crime (also referred to as cyber crime, e-crime or hi-tech crime) can beclassified into the following categories:• Content related crime - child pornography and criminal copyright infringement.• Traditional crimes committed by means of a computer - fraud and theft.• Attacks on computers and computer systems – hacking, pharming and phishing.Those engaging in illegal activities online often have unlimited resources, time,and in most cases motivation, requiring businesses and government agencies toinvest significant time and resources to upgrade their security programs to battlethe hacker. As soon as a new protocol is developed and announced, it seems thathackers have it figured out, and a more elaborate design must be developed. A2006 FBI estimate pegged the total cost of cyber crime to businesses above $67billion. This case study will explore the different ways that cyber crime mightimpact students personally, as well as raise awareness of the broader implicationsfor our economy and national security.
Chinese hackers seek U.S. access
Attacks highlight weaknesses in U.S. security
Infamous spammer arrested,faces new charges
By Byron Acohido.....................................................................................6
 Additional resources/Voices
Further exploration and Voices extension....................................................................................8
C y b e r c r i m e
By J
on Swart zU S ATODAY
SAN FRANCISCO — The cyberattackof a U.S. military computer systemhas deepened concern about cyber-spying and the security of theInternet's infrastructure.Chinese hackers were most likelybehind an intrusion in Novemberthat disabled the Naval War College'snetwork, forcing it to disconnectfrom the Internet for several weeks,says Lt. Cmdr. Doug Gabos, aspokesman for the Navy CyberDefense Operations Command inNorfolk, Va.Forensic analysis indicates the hack-ers may have sought information onwar games in development at thenaval college, he said. The collegewas vulnerable because it did nothave the latest security protections,Gabos said.The November attack was part of anongoing campaign by Chinese hack-ers to penetrate government com-puters. The attacks often come in theform of "spear phishing," scamswhere attackers craft e-mail mes-sages that seem to originate from therecipient's organization in a ploy togain unauthorized access to confi-dential data.
 
Reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.Page 2
 AS SE EN IN USA TODAY’S MONEY SE CTI ON, MARCH 12, 2007, 3B
by Robert Hanishiro, USATODAY
China is also using more traditionalhacking methods, such as computerviruses and worms, but in sophisticat-ed ways, says Alan Paller, director of the security research organizationSANS Institute.Hackers are directly breaking into mil-itary and government computers, andexploiting the side doors of privatenetworks connected to them, Pallersays.The intrusions spotlight the softunderbelly in U.S. cybersecurity. Theyalso underline the need for the federalgovernment to develop policies thatdefine responsibilities between thepublic and private sectors to fend off hackers and terrorists, say militaryofficials and cybersecurity expertsincluding Jody Westby, CEO of GlobalCyber Risk.The attacks also underscore flaws inInternet security and the difficulty intracking bad guys, says Westby, acybersecurity consultant inWashington. Such "Swiss cheese"holes, she says, not only compromisemilitary and government networksbut those of businesses and criticalinfrastructure."The Internet was not designed forsecurity, and there are 243 countriesconnected to the Internet," saysWestby, who estimates 100 countriesare planning infowar capabilities."What's more, many countries don'thave cybercrime laws."Chinese hackers gained notoriety inthe USA after a series of coordinatedattacks on American computer sys-tems at NASA and Sandia NationalLaboratories, dating to 2003, weretraced to a team of researchers inGuangdong province. The program,called Titan Rain by the DefenseDepartment, first became public inAugust 2005. The DefenseDepartment has since retitled theprogram under a classified name.The hackers are still active, butGabos would not say if the intrusionat the Naval War College was linkedto previous attacks.China is aggressively improving itsinformation warfare capabilities,according to a December 2006Chinese military white paper. Itsgoal is to be "capable of winninginformationized wars" by the mid-21st century.The motives of Chinese hackers runthe gamut from intelligence gather-ing to technology theft and the infil-tration of defense networks forfuture action, cybersecurity expertssay.The intent of Chinese operatives isunclear, but most agree they aregathering information, says PeterNeumann, a scientist at SRIInternational, a non-profit researchinstitute.U.S. cyberwarfare strategy, mean-while, is disjointed because organi-zations responsible for cyberoffense,such as the National SecurityAgency, and defense, such as theNaval Network Warfare Command,are not linked, Gen. JamesCartwright, commander of theStrategic Command, said in a speechat the Air Warfare Symposium inFlorida in February.The U.S. must take aggressive meas-ures against foreign hackers andwebsites that help others attackgovernment systems, Gen. RonaldKeys, commander of Air CombatCommand, told reporters in Floridaon Feb. 9."I think it's going to take an Internet9/11, and we've had some prettyserious problems on the Internet"for the country to seriously re-examine its approach to cyberwar-fare, he said, according to a tran-script.
 
SEATTLE -- The tech security world cheered the FBI'sannouncement Wednesday of a crackdown on cyber-crooks who control networks of compromised comput-ers, called botnets, to spread spam and carry out scams.But the arrests in recent weeks of accused bot con-trollers James Brewer of Arlington, Texas; Jason MichaelDowney of Covington, Ky.; and Robert Alan Soloway of Seattle will barely make a ripple, security analysts say."We applaud the government's involvement in stoppingcybercrime," says Tom Gillis, senior marketing vice presi-dent at messaging security firm IronPort Systems. "Butthese arrests are a tiny drop in the bucket."Soloway made a name for himself selling spamming kitsand botnet access to fledgling spammers, according to acivil case he lost to Microsoft in 2005. He was arrested inSeattle last month and charged with continued spam-ming.Downey and Brewer controlled smaller botnets, federaldistrict court documents in Michigan and Illinois say. Thecourt documents did not detail what they used theirnetworks for.Criminals turn computers into bots with malicious soft-ware programs spread through viral e-mail attachmentsand tainted Web pages. They become relay points tospread spam and can also steal any sensitive data typedby the user. Elite bot "herders" control botnets of often10,000 to 100,000 computers that are difficult to detectand shut down."Botnets are increasing, but we've just scratched the sur-face of what botnets are going to do," says DougCamplejohn, CEO of security firm Mi5 Networks.The FBI asks PC users with suspected compromisedcomputers to contact their Internet service provider,then file a complaint online through the FBI's InternetCrime Complaint Center."The majority of victims are not even aware that theircomputer has been compromised or their personal infor-mation exploited," says James Finch, assistant directorfor the FBI's Cyber Division. "Citizens can protect them-selves from botnets and the associated schemes by prac-ticing strong computer security habits to reduce the riskthat your computer will be compromised."
Page 3eprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
 AS SE EN IN USATODAY’S MONEY SE CTI ON, JUNE 14, 2007, 2B
Cybercrime arrests by FBI‘a tiny drop in the bucket’
By Byron AcohidoUSATODAY
Sam Ward, USATODAY

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