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US Latino Religious Identification 1990-2008: Growth, Diversity & Transformation

US Latino Religious Identification 1990-2008: Growth, Diversity & Transformation

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The ARIS Latino Report is the third major report based on the findings of the American Religious Identification Survey, ARIS 2008, and the earlier surveys in the ARIS time series. In this report we focus on three aspects of U.S. Latino religious identification – growth, diversity and transformation.
The ARIS Latino Report is the third major report based on the findings of the American Religious Identification Survey, ARIS 2008, and the earlier surveys in the ARIS time series. In this report we focus on three aspects of U.S. Latino religious identification – growth, diversity and transformation.

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10/29/2013

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U.S. Latino Religious Identification 1990-2008:Growth, Diversity & Transformation
 A Report Based on the American Religious Identification Survey 2008
 Juhem Navarro-Rivera, Barry A. Kosmin and Ariela Keysar
 
U.S. Latino Religious Identification 1990-2008: Growth, Diversity & Transformation
 Juhem Navarro-Rivera, Barry A. Kosmin and Ariela Keysar
The majority of the 31 million adult U.S. Latinos self-identified as Catholic (60%) in 2008 although theproportion is down when compared to 1990 (66%).(Figure 1)
Whereas in 1990 Latino Catholics numbered 9.6 millionand comprised 20% of all U.S. Catholics the 2008 estimatefor Latino Catholics is over 18 million comprising 32% of allU.S. Catholics.Over the period 1990-2008 without the infusion of 9million adult Latinos the U.S. Catholic Church would havegrown by only 2 million adults and shrunk as a share of the total U.S. population.
The combined non-Catholic Christian traditions also lostmarket share from 1990-2008, falling from 25% to 22%,though they almost doubled their absolute numbers to 7million adults. (Figure 1)
Within this grouping there was realignment, with the non-denominational Christian Generic and ProtestantSect traditions gaining at the expense of the Mainline andBaptist traditions. (Figure 2)
The fastest-growing religious traditions among U.S.Latinos are:
The Nones (no religion) up from less than a million or 6% of  the population in 1990 to nearly 4 million and 12% in2008 (Figure 1) and
Protestant Sects (such as Jehovah’s Witnesses), which
grew from 335,000 and 2% to 1.2 million or 4% of allLatinos. (Figure 2)
Americanization is leading to de-Catholicization andreligious polarization. U.S.-born Latinos and those mostproficient in English are less likely to self-identify asCatholic and more likely to identify either as None (noreligion) or with conservative Christian traditions.(Figures 13,14,15)Latino religious polarization may be influenced by agender effect, as in the general U.S. population, with menmoving toward no religion and women toward moreconservative religious traditions and practices. (Figure 3)
Two traditions at opposite poles of the religious spectrumexhibit the largest gender imbalance: the None populationis heavily male (61%) while the Pentecostal is heavilyfemale (58%).
There are remarkable differences and imbalances in themarital status patterns by religious tradition and gender.(Figure 5)
The percentage of unmarried persons co-habiting with apartner and so outside of civil or religious marriage variesfrom 15% among the Nones, to 11% among Catholics to7% among non-Catholic Christians.
There are imbalances in marital status between the sexesespecially among Catholics, with large surpluses ofCatholic never-married single men and of widowed andseparated Catholic Latinas.
Latinas are much more loyal to Catholic Churchprohibitions against divorce and remarriage. The number of Catholic Latinas claiming to be separated outnumbersseparated men more than 2:1. (Figure 5)The differences in marital status among Latinos of different traditions also suggest that marriage andpartnership across religious boundaries are a commonoccurrence. For example there are over 1.1 millionmarried male Nones but fewer than 400,000 marriedfemale Nones.
There are considerable age differences betweenadherents of the various religious traditions. The traditionswith the largest proportion of young Latinos are Nonesand the Protestant Sects; these two were also the fastestgrowing among Latinos since 1990. (Figure 4)Social class differences are evident between religioustraditions.
The most educated group is the Nones (25% with a collegedegree); the least educated is the Protestant Sects (8%with a college degree). (Figure 9)Christian Generic identifiers are the most suburbanized.(Figure 7)
Latinos are transforming patterns of religiousidentification at the state level in different ways. (Figure 8)
From 1990 to 2008 Latinos went from being 51% of allCatholics in California to 56%.Latino Nones in California increased from 10 % of allCalifornian Nones in 1990 to 24% in 2008.In Texas the percentage of Latinos among all Catholics fellfrom 73% to 66% between 1990 and 2008 while LatinoNones rose from 15% to 28% of all Texans without areligious identification.Latinos comprised 8% of all Texans in the ChristianGeneric tradition in 1990 but 20% in 2008.Protestant Sects have gained ground in New York andFlorida to become one-tenth of the Latino population in those states.
Political party preference and voter registration showsvariation by religious tradition. (Figures 11, 12)
Latino Catholics and Nones are most likely to prefer theDemocratic Party.Republican Party preferences are more common among  the non-Catholic Christian religious traditions.
Highlights
 
 
U.S. Latino Religious Identification 1990-2008:Growth, Diversity & Transformation
Contents
Introduction
............................................................................................................................................
i
 
Methodological Note
.............................................................................................................................
ii
 
Part IGrowth:National Trends in Latino Religious Identification 1990-2008
..................................................
1Figure 1
Religious Self-Identification of the U.S.Latino Adult Population 1990 & 2008
........................................................
1Figure 2
Profile of Non-Catholic Christians amongU.S. Latino Adults 1990 & 2008
 
.................................................................
2Part IIDiversity:Socio-demographic Patterns of Latino Religious Identification .
.................................................
3A.Gender
...........................................................................................................................................
3Figure 3a
Sex Ratios of Latinos by SelectedReligious Traditions 2008
...........................................................................
3Figure 3b
Religious Profile of Male and FemaleAdult Latinos 2008
......................................................................................
3B.Age
.................................................................................................................................................
4Figure 4a
Age Distribution and Mean Age of AdultLatinos in Selected Religious Traditions
.....................................................
4Figure 4b
Religious Profile of Adult Latinosby Age Group 2008
.....................................................................................
5C.Marital Status
................................................................................................................................
5Figure 5
Marital Status of U.S. Latinos by Sexby Selected Religious Traditions 2008
.......................................................
6D.Geography
.....................................................................................................................................
7Figure 6
Percentage Distribution of Selected Religious Traditionsamong U.S. Latinos by Census Region in 1990 & 2008
.............................
7Figure 7
Residential Location of Selected Religious Traditions amongU.S. Latinos in 1990 & 2008
......................................................................
8Figure 8
U.S. Latinos in California, Florida, New York and Texasin 1990 & 2008 by Selected Religious Traditions
.....................................
10

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