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Thomas Riggs Family

Thomas Riggs Family

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Published by Bob Pierce

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Categories:Types, Research, Genealogy
Published by: Bob Pierce on Mar 28, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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Thomas Riggs Family
Generation 1
1.
Thomas Riggs
-1. He was born 1525 in Lincolnshire, England.
1.
Thomas Riggs and unknown spouse. They had 1 child.
i.2.
Edward Riggs
. He was born 1557 in Lincolnshire, England.
Generation 2
2.
Edward Riggs
-2 (Thomas Riggs-1). He was born 1557 in Lincolnshire, England.
2.
Edward Riggs and unknown spouse. They had 1 child.
i.3.
Edward Riggs
[1]
. He was born 1590 in Lincolnshire, England
[2]
. He died 1671 inMassachusetts. Fact 1 in Father is either Edward or Thomas Riggs.
Generation 3
3.
Edward Riggs
-3 (Edward Riggs-2, Thomas Riggs-1)
[1]
. He was born 1590 in Lincolnshire,England
[2]
. He died 1671 in Massachusetts. Fact 1 in Father is either Edward or Thomas Riggs.Notes for Edward Riggs:General Notes:From: Genealogy of the Riggs Family By John Hankins WallacePages 1-2"He landed in Boston, early in the summer of 1633, with his family, consisting of his wifeElizabeth, two sons, and four daughters. These children must have been young people pretty wellgrown, for his oldest son was married two years after arrival. They were among the very earlysettlers in Roxbury, then a suburb but now part of the city of Boston. It was said that the bestpeople settled in Roxbury. Like all immigrants, they had their full share of trials and sorrows. Thefirst death recorded in the old books of Roxbury was that of Lydia Riggs, daughter of Edward, inAugust, 1633. In May, 1634, another daughter, Elizabeth, died, and in October of the same year the son John. August, 1635, the wife and mother, Elizabeth, died. Sometime after this Edwardtook a second wife, but there were no children from this union. She was also named Elizabeth,and all we know of her history is that she died 1669. It is wholly evident that Edward was a Puritanin belief and life, for in 1634 he was made a freeman, wh1ch means a voter, and the first step tothat privilege was to be a member of the church. On a loose leaf found in the ancient transcriptthere is an enumeration of the inhabitants of Roxbury, made sometime between the years 1638and 164o, in which Edward1s family consisted of four persons, and it is not violent to assume thatthey were himself, his wife, and two daughters, who afterward became Mrs. Allen and Mrs.Twitchell. From his will dated September 2, 1670, it appears that only three lines of descentsurvived him, and that all his children were dead except Mary Twitchell. His daughter, Mrs. Allen,left a daughter, Elizabeth Allen, then of age and a legatee. Of the children of Mrs. Twitchell onlyJoseph and Mary are named, and they, as well .as others not named, appear to have beenminors. Mrs. Twitchell was the principal legatee. His first bequest is " that to my daughter-in-law,my sonne Edward Rigges, his wife," and "to my four grandchildren, my sonne Edward Rigges1children." It will be noticed that none of these is named, and as I could find only three children of the second Edward for a long time, there was some doubt as to whether Edward of Derby, Conn.,and Newark, N. J., was the son of the testator. At last I found the fourth child, Samuel of Derby.The will furnishes reasonable evidence that the testator had personal knowledge of and affectionfor his daughter-in-law, and that she and her children then lived at a distance remote fromRoxbury. It is also evident that he knew the widow and children of his " sonne Edward " were not
Page 1 of 726Saturday, March 27, 2010 11:25:16 PM
 
Thomas Riggs Family
Generation 3 (con't)
 in needy circumstances, or he would not have assumed the possibility of their not claiming thelegacies he left to them. As a quiet, Christian man, his long life came to a close 1672, leaving agood name as the inheritance of the thousands descended from him."
Elizabeth unknown
[3]
. She was born 1595 in ENGLAND
[4]
.Edward Riggs and Elizabeth unknown. They had 6 children.
i.4.
Edward Riggs
[5]
. He was born 1614 in ENGLAND
[5]
. He married ElizabethRoosa. They were married on 05 Apr 1635. He died 1668 in New Jersey.
ii.
Lydia Riggs
[6]
. She was born Abt. 1616 in ENGLAND
[7]
. She died 1633 in NewJersey
[8]
.
iii.
Elizabeth Riggs
[9]
. She was born Abt. 1620
[10]
. She died Aug 1634
[11]
.
iv.
unknown Riggs
[12]
. She was born 1622
[13]
.
v.
Mary Riggs
[14]
. She was born 1625
[15]
.
vi.
John Riggs
. He was born Abt. 1618
[16]
. He died 1634
[17]
.
Generation 4
4.
Edward Riggs
-4 (Edward Riggs-3, Edward Riggs-2, Thomas Riggs-1)
[5]
. He was born 1614 inENGLAND
[5]
. He died 1668 in New Jersey.Notes for Edward Riggs:General Notes:From: Genealogy of the Riggs family By John Hankins WallacePages 5-6"Edward Riggs,3 (son of Edward1 the immigrant) was born in England about 1614, and came tothis country along with his father and family, landing in Boston, Mass., in the early summer of 1633. He assisted his father in preparing a new habitation and in taking care of the sick until April5, 1635, when he married Elizabeth Roosa, quite a young girl, a daughter of a family of that namewho had come over from England and settled in Boston. In August, of the same year, his mother died, and how long he remained in assisting his father is not known, but it is known that he soonset about establishing a home of his own. In 1637 he was a sergeant in the Pequot war, and hegreatly distinguished himself by rescuing a body of his companions from an ambuscade into whichthey had been led by the Indians, and in which they all would have been cut off. By this notableact of bravery and skill the name of " Sergeant Riggs " became his well-known designation as longas he lived. Nothing is now known of his location between 1635 and 1640, but in the latter year hebecame a settler at Milford, Conn., and had land assigned him.In 1655, associated with Edward Wooster, Eichard Baldwin, John Browne, Robert Dennison, JohnBurnett and perhaps others, they bought from the Indians the district of country on the Naugatuck,then known as Paugusset, some ten or twelve miles above Milford, and established a plantationwhich was afterward called Derby. The location of Sergeant Riggs is still known as " Riggs1 Hill."
Page 2 of 726Saturday, March 27, 2010 11:25:16 PM
 
i.
Thomas Riggs Family
Generation 4 (con't)
 On this hill, which is still in the possession of his descendants, he placed his habitation and built astrong stockade as a protection against the Indians. The first house stood by the rock, a few rodsfrom where the present residence stands, and in this house Sergeant Edward secreted andprotected Whaley and Goff, two of the English Parliament that condemned and executed CharlesI., while the emissaries of Charles II. were making most diligent search for them all along theConnecticut coast, in 1661. While Edward was not a member of the church and consequently nota voter, this brave act, in the face of the vengeance of the re-established English throne,establishes beyond question two points in his character, viz., that he was governed by hisconvictions in considering human rights, and that his sympathies were wholly with the Puritans intheir struggle for liberty with the mother country. In such a character it is not difficult to understandthat he should mentally rebel against laws which exeluded from the exercise of the rights of citizenship unless he was first a member of the church. Here we find a possible motive for hischange of location in the advanced years of his life.The Province of New Jersey was named as a grant from the Crown, 1664, and it was believed tobe a region specially attractive to settlers. In 1665 Edward, with some of his associates in theplantation of Derby, visited it, and were so well pleased with the prospects that they determined tofound a new plantation on the Passaic that would be accessible to the outer world by the sailingcraft of that day, and the site of Newark was then decided upon. The next year he spent most of the summer there preparing for the advent of the proposed colony, and his wife was with him, thefirst white .woman to spend a summer in Newark. The fundamental agreement was executed June24, 1667. The colony was quite large, and in it were a number of his old associates in theplantation at Derby. His two sons, Edward and Joseph, were designated as " Planters," that is,original proprietors. The former did not arrive till later in the year, and the latter had no home lotassigned him, because he was still a bachelor. The other son, Samuel, was provided for at Derbyand remained there. In 1668, the next year after the colony was fully organized, Edward died. Hiswidow, Elizabeth, still a healthy and well-preserved woman, sometime previous to 1671 marriedCaleb Carwithie. Previous to her marriage she conveyed to her son Joseph one-half of her homelot."
Elizabeth Roosa
[18]
. She was born 1618 in Connecticut. She died in New Jersey.Edward Riggs and Elizabeth Roosa. They were married on 05 Apr 1635. They had 4 children.
i.5.
Edward Riggs
[19]
. He was born 1636 in Massachusetts
[20]
.
ii.
Joseph Riggs
[21]
. He was born 1642 in Milford Connecticut
[21]
.
iii.
Samuel Riggs
[22]
. He was born 1640 in Milford Connecticut
[22]
.
iv.
Mary Riggs
[22]
. She was born 1644 in Milford Connecticut
[22]
.
Generation 5
5.
Edward Riggs
-5 (Edward Riggs-4, Edward Riggs-3, Edward Riggs-2, Thomas Riggs-1)
[19]
. Hewas born 1636 in Massachusetts
[20]
.
Mary unknown
. She was born 1640 in Massachusetts.Edward Riggs and Mary unknown. They had 10 children.
Anna Riggs
[23]
. She was born 1662
[22]
.
Page 3 of 726Saturday, March 27, 2010 11:25:16 PM

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