Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
8Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Hikido

Hikido

Ratings: (0)|Views: 409|Likes:
Published by anindya.partha

More info:

Published by: anindya.partha on Mar 29, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/10/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 1
Japanese Sliding Doors
:
Shouji
障子
 
&
Fusuma
 
The Japanese people have been known for their ingenuity and sophisticated crafting skills of wood inbuilding architectures, since the ancient times.Architectural features like sliding woodendoors
Shouji 
障子
and
Fusuma
reflect how theJapanese culture has been coloured by thosewoodworks. When anyone visits old temples,palaces of the imperial family or any castle of ashogun, the functionality of these two types of doors is revealed to him in its ingenuity andaesthetic. Even today, it is one of the mostcommon elements seen in traditional Japanese-style houses’ decor.
Shouji 
障子
and
Fusuma
are the two well-known
Hikido
(
).
Hikido
(
き戸
) is ageneric term for doors which slide sideways. Unlike the swinging doors that open in and out,
引き
opens by sliding horizontally on sill and head jamb tracks and requires no space for opening andclosing. Thus it conserves space and can easily be kept open when occasion demands. Because of thisfeature it perfectly suited to the Japanese-style buildings’ smaller architecture.
The Shouji 
and
Fusuma
are classified as
hikishouji 
 
引障子
, or a pair of sliding doors which move in one track andrather than overlap. They do not have any wheel under them, so they are carefully crafted to slide intheir slots using a one-finger push.
Hikido (
引き戸
):
Shouji 
障子
&
Fusuma
 
Shouji 
consists of a checkered lightweight wooden framework and a single thin sheet of translucent Japan paper
washi 
 
和紙
mounted only on the outer side of a wooden lattice to let the lightthrough. The
washi 
paper used for shoji screens is made with a specific thinness that allows the light toenter in a pleasant way and to distribute evenly, making it soft to the eye. It produces the beauty of “shade and shadow” and maintains privacy.
Shouji
障子
or Akarishouji
明障子
 
http://www.translation-anindya.blogspot.com
 
 2
Shouji 
started being used in the 8th century duringthe late Heian Period, and served to divide one roominto two smaller rooms, the same as
Fusuma
. As thepaper is translucent,
Shouji 
are also used as windowshades instead of curtains to soften direct sunlightcoming through the window. These doors aresometimes used in the summer because they passlight and give a cooler feeling. Traditional Japanesehomes have exterior shutters called
ama-do
. Theseshutters are closed at night and during bad weather.A
Shouji 
障子
, whenever it is used, is positioned onthe inboard side of the wooden shutters. On a niceday the home’s shutters might be opened up, makingthe
Shouji 
easily visible from the outside.The
Shouji 
doors are not meant to be exposed to therain.There are two typical types of Shoji. The traditionaltype has a single grid with framing, paper applied toonly one side. The grid is visible from inside the room,
http://www.translation-anindya.blogspot.com
 
 3with just the paper and shadow of the grid visible from outside the house. The western style is to have 2identical grid-works with the paper sandwiched in the center. Fine, thin silk cloth is occasionally usedinstead of paper.Shoji can be designed in many different ways depending on the design of the lattice frame. There areshoji called
yukimi-shoji 
, or snow viewing shoji which incorporate a glass window in the lower portion of the door, a vertical shoji sliding panel can be raised revealing the window.As distinguished from the translucent screen Shouji
明障子
, Fusuma
is an opaque sliding door. It is aninterior door used as apartition between rooms toblock eyes and as cupboarddoors. They are usuallycovered with a decorativepaper and are normally usedas pairs, or as pairs of pairs.
 
Fusuma
or Fusumashouji
襖障子
:
Fusuma
consists of awooden lattice understructurewith special Japanese paperpasted on either side. Theytypically have a black lacquerborder, and round indentedmetal door-pulls for openingand closing. There is air spacebetween the two pieces of paper that acts as insulation to help keep the room cool in summer andwarm in winter. Unlike the translucent
 Akarishouji 
明障
,
Fusuma
doors are madewith a heavier paper. The unique papers andclothes covering the surface of 
Fusuma
alsodecorate the door and the room altogether bytheir pictures that varies from traditionaldesigns to modern designs.
Fusuma
first appeared in the Muromachi period(1392-1565). They were used to close off largespaces into smaller rooms and as closet doors.During the Azuchi-Momoyama (
安土桃山時代
:1568-1600) and Edo (
江戸時代
: 1600-1868)periods, military lords established splendid
 fusuma: Sannoma Joraku Hall, Nagoya Castle's main keep 
http://www.translation-anindya.blogspot.com

Activity (8)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
jparks778 liked this
jparks778 liked this
bazgacip liked this
Feri-kun liked this
super784 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->