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150 Chess Endings Part. 2

150 Chess Endings Part. 2

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Published by elvuelodelcondor
Fifty-two endgame experts were selected from the over-the-board players. Their 150 best over-the-board, theoretical and composed endings got new annotations.
Great innovators are Philidor, Lasker, Botvinnik and Kramnik. Philidor played the first recorded endgame of acceptable quality. Lasker used endgame technique as a weapon. He approached perfection in some games. Botvinnik scored wins and saved games by superior analyses of adjourned games. Kramnik applies all aspects of struggle and prophylaxis with great talent.

Other experts from the list of fifty are Tarrasch, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Euwe, Reshevsky, Keres, Smyslov, Petrosian, Korchnoi, Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov.
The endings are a small selection from a series of thirty books on chess players as endgame artists.
Fifty-two endgame experts were selected from the over-the-board players. Their 150 best over-the-board, theoretical and composed endings got new annotations.
Great innovators are Philidor, Lasker, Botvinnik and Kramnik. Philidor played the first recorded endgame of acceptable quality. Lasker used endgame technique as a weapon. He approached perfection in some games. Botvinnik scored wins and saved games by superior analyses of adjourned games. Kramnik applies all aspects of struggle and prophylaxis with great talent.

Other experts from the list of fifty are Tarrasch, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Euwe, Reshevsky, Keres, Smyslov, Petrosian, Korchnoi, Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov.
The endings are a small selection from a series of thirty books on chess players as endgame artists.

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Published by: elvuelodelcondor on Apr 04, 2010
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150 CHESS ENDINGS PART 2 by Jan van Reek
150 CHESS ENDINGS PART 2
 
http://www.scribd.com/elvuelodelcondor 
Page 1
Fifty-two endgame experts were selected from the over-the-board players. Their 150 best over-the-board, theoretical and composed endings got new annotations.Great innovators are Philidor, Lasker, Botvinnik and Kramnik. Philidor played thefirst recorded endgame of acceptable quality. Lasker used endgame technique as a weapon. He approached perfection in some games. Botvinnik scored wins andsaved games by superior analyses of adjourned games. Kramnik applies all aspectsof struggle and prophylaxis with great talent.Other experts from the list of fifty are Tarrasch, Rubinstein, Capablanca, Euwe,Reshevsky, Keres, Smyslov, Petrosian, Korchnoi, Fischer, Karpov and Kasparov.The endings are a small selection from a series of thirty books on chess players asendgame artists.The games diverts from the usual order in two ways: A. Players are rank ordered by year of birth.B. The round number has been used for the follow-up of the endings by theexpert.
(51) Atkins,Henry - Capablanca,Jose [B12]
Capablanca London 1922 (3), 1888
[JvR] 
1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 ¥f5 4.¥d3 ¥xd3 5.£xd3 e6 6.¤e2 £b6 7.0
0 £a68.£d1 c5 9.c3 ¤c6 10.¤d2 cxd4 11.cxd4 £d3 12.¤b3 £xd1 13.¦xd1
Blackhas the good bishop.
13...¤ge7 14.¥d2 a5!! 15.¦ac1 b6!
Capablanca carries outthe fight for terrain in an original manner.
16.a4 ¢d7 17.¤c3 ¤a7! 18.¢f1 ¤ec619.¢e2 ¦c8 20.¥e1 ¥e7 21.¤b1 f5 22.exf6!? ¥xf6!? 23.¥c3 ¤b4 24.¥d2
[The exchange 24.¥xb4 axb4 weakens the a-pawn.]
24...¤ac6 25.¥e3 ¤a226.¦c2 ¦c7 27.¤a3 ¦hc8 28.¦cd2 ¤a7 29.¦d3?
[White does not play 29.¥f4for the third time. 29...¤c1+ 30.¤xc1 ¦xc1 31.¦xc1 ¦xc1 32.¦c2 ¦xc2+ 33.¤xc2leads to many exchanges.]
29...¤b4 30.¦3d2 ¦c6
Black controls the c-file.
31.¦b1 ¥e7 32.¦a1 ¥d6 33.h3 ¦6c7 34.¦ad1 ¤a2! 35.¦a1 ¥xa3 36.¦xa2¥b4 37.¦d1 ¦c4! 38.¦c1 ¤c6 39.¦xc4 dxc4 40.¤d2 ¥xd2! 41.¢xd2
 
150 CHESS ENDINGS PART 2 by Jan van Reek
150 CHESS ENDINGS PART 2
 
http://www.scribd.com/elvuelodelcondor 
Page 2
 White has a poor position despite the exchanges.
41...¢d6 42.¢c3 ¢d5 43.¦a1g6 44.f3 ¦b8 45.¦a3 b5 46.axb5 ¦xb5
 Another exchange helps Black.
47.¥f2¤b4! 48.b3
[48.¥e3? ¤d3! 49.b3 ¦xb3+! 50.¦xb3 cxb3 51.¢xb3 ¤e1 showselegance.]
48...cxb3 49.¢xb3
[49.¦xb3? ¤a2+ 50.¢b2 ¦xb3+ 51.¢xb3 ¤c1+52.¢c2 ¤e2 53.¢b3 ¤f4! and the knight decides the game.]
49...¤c6+ 50.¢c3¦b1 51.¦a4 ¦c1+ 52.¢d2?
 White misses his last chance, [52.¢d3! ¤b4+ 53.¢e3¦c3+ 54.¢f4!! ¤c6 55.¦a2 The role of the white king changes from defender toattacker.]
52...¦c4! 53.¦a1 a4 54.¦a3 ¤a7 55.¦a1 ¤b5 56.¦b1 ¢c6!
[Theexchanges starting with 56...¤xd4?! lead to a difficult rook ending.]
57.¢d3 ¦c3+58.¢d2 ¦b3 59.¦c1+
[Or 59.¦xb3 axb3 60.¢d3 b2! 61.¢c2 ¤c3 62.¢xb2 ¤d1+63.¢c2 ¤xf2 64.¢d2 ¤h1!]
59...¢b7 60.¦c2 a3 61.¥g3
[Black also wins in61.¥e3 ¢a6 62.g4 ¢a5 63.h4 ¢b4]
61...¤xd4 62.¦c7+ ¢b6 63.¦c4 ¢b564.¦c8 ¤c6 65.¦a8 ¦b2+ 66.¢e3 ¦xg2 67.¥f2 ¤b4
 As a child I had greatadmiration for the deceptive simplicity of this game.
0
1
 
(52) Capablanca,Jose - Rubinstein,Akiba [C09]
Capablanca Berlin 1928 (4), 1888
[JvR] 
1.d4 d5 2.¤f3 c5 3.dxc5 e6 4.e4 ¥xc5 5.exd5 exd5 6.¥b5+ ¤c6 7.0
0 ¤ge78.¤bd2 0
0 9.¤b3 ¥b6 10.¦e1 ¥g4 11.¥d3 ¤g6 12.h3 ¥xf3 13.£xf3¤ce5 14.£f5 ¤xd3 15.£xd3 d4 16.¥d2 £f6 17.¦e4 ¦ad8 18.¦ae1 £c619.g3 ¦fe8 20.¥a5 ¦xe4 21.£xe4 ¤f8 22.£xc6 bxc6
 White controls moreterrain.
23.¦e7
He seeks targets.
23...¦d5!?
[23...d3! 24.cxd3 ¦xd3 25.¥xb6 axb626.¦b7 ¤d7 gives an excellent alternative.]
24.¥xb6 axb6 25.¦b7 ¤d7
[A pawnis lost in 25...b5? 26.¦c7 ¦d6 27.¤a5]
26.¦c7 ¦d6?
 
150 CHESS ENDINGS PART 2 by Jan van Reek
150 CHESS ENDINGS PART 2
 
http://www.scribd.com/elvuelodelcondor 
Page 3
[The handy 26...c5! 27.¦c8+ ¤f8 28.¦b8 c4! 29.¤d2 b5 means survival for Black.]
27.¦c8+ ¤f8 28.¤d2 c5 29.¤c4 ¦e6 30.¦b8
Capa has found the aim.
30...¦e1+ 31.¢g2 g5 32.a4 ¦a1
[Or 32...¦c1 33.¤xb6 ¦xc2 34.¤d7 d3 35.¦xf8+¢g7 36.¦d8 (Karpov and Zaitsev).]
33.¤xb6 ¢g7 34.¦c8 ¤e6 35.¤d7 ¦xa436.¤xc5 ¦b4
[36...¦c4?? 37.¤xe6+!]
37.¤d3!
The knight becomes a usefulblockader.
37...¦b5 38.¢f3 h6 39.b4 h5 40.g4 hxg4+ 41.hxg4 f6 42.¦c4 ¢f743.¤c5 ¤d8
[No use has 43...¤xc5 44.bxc5]
44.¤b3
Rubinstein overstepped thetime limit in a lost position.
1
0(53) Lasker,Emanuel - Capablanca,Jose [D61]
Capablanca W Ch Havana 1921 (5), 1888
[JvR] 
1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.¤c3 ¤f6 4.¥g5 ¥e7 5.e3 0
0 6.¤f3 ¤bd7 7.£c2 c5 8.¦d1£a5 9.¥d3 h6 10.¥h4 cxd4 11.exd4 dxc4 12.¥xc4 ¤b6 13.¥b3 ¥d7 14.0
0 ¦ac8 15.¤e5 ¥b5 16.¦fe1 ¤bd5 17.¥xd5 ¤xd5 18.¥xe7 ¤xe7 19.£b3¥c6 20.¤xc6 bxc6 21.¦e5 £b6 22.£c2 ¦fd8 23.¤e2 ¦d5 24.¦xd5 cxd525.£d2

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