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Hay Chart

Hay Chart

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Published by Shadowxan
USD $ Hay Chart used for Job Aevaluation as per Hay Methodology
USD $ Hay Chart used for Job Aevaluation as per Hay Methodology

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Published by: Shadowxan on Apr 05, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/22/2013

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1
I
~
 
KNOW-HOW
The sum
of
knowledge, skill and experience -however acquired -necessary for fully acceptable job performance.It has three dimensions:
Technical Know-How
Required depth and scope
of
specialised knowledge. As you read down the scale from A to
H,
you recognise increasing specialisation
in
some jobs,and an increase
in
scope or range
of
general knowledge
in
others.Depth: ranging from knowledge
of
the simplest work routines to unique and authoritative knowledge within complex disciplines.Scope: variety
of
things, processes, products etc., from few to many, about which knowledge
is
required.
D
Management
Know-How
The knowledge required for harmonizing, integrating and managing activities and functions.
It
involves combining some or all
of
the elements
of
planning, organizing, directing, executing, assessing and controlling, and takes account
of
the time scale / planning horizon in.the job.Management Breadth is related to the size and complexity
of
an organisation reflecting such things as functional.diversity, business diversity,geographic spread and strategic horizons. It may be exercised
in
an
executive or advisory/consultative way.
L...
---d
Human Relations
Skills
The skills needed to communicate with and influence individuals and groups, within and outside the organisation
in
order to achieve results with andthrough people.
Basic
Dealing with other people is primarilyconcerned with requesting and providinginformation. Ordinary courtesy, tact and
effectiveness
in
dealing with others arerequired.
Legend
Blue
=
logical combinationsRed
=
less likely combinationsGrey
=
highly unlikely combinations
2
Important
Interaction with others demands understanding,providing support and/or influencing. Empathyand assertiveness are necessary but persuasionand reasoning are based on job-specificknowledge, more than inspiring and motivating.
c.
c'
3
Critical
Interaction with others
is
critical
to the job orrole and
is
concerned with changing behaviour.
It
involves inspiration, motivation, thedevelopment of others and the creation of theright working climate.
,J
•.
-
....
 
-
,j
--
--
.
I.
-
-
I
.
O.
'
II.
III.·IV.
·V.
Task
Activity
RelatedHeterogeneous
Functionally
ComplElxNery
Performance
of
anPerformance orOperational
or
Operational
or
CompleteLarge
isolated task orsupervision
of
conceptual conceptualFull integration andManagerialtasks, specific as
to
multiple activities,performan,;e and/orintegration and
management
of
allintegration
of
allobjective andwhich are specific as
management
of
management
of
functions within aactivities in a very
to
objective andcontent. Interactingcontent. Interactingareas that are functions which are large organisation.large complexwith otherswith co-workers isrelated
to
each other diverse in nature
Management
of
aorganisation,principallyrequired. as well asas
to
nature and
and
which are
major
strategicalmost certainlyconnected toappropriateobjective and
thedecisive
infunction in very largewith intemationalreceivingawareness
of
related
management
of
achieving
the
complex
organisationdimensionsinstructions.activities.relationships/interfacorganisation'ses with otherobjectivesfunctions.
OR
management
of
astrategic function ina large organisation
..
~
 
H ~ m a n
 
Relation Skills
.....
1
23
1
23
1
23
1
2 3
1
2 3
1
2
3
A.
BASIC;
Basic knowledge
of
simple instructions, facts and information necessary
to
38
4")
50
50
57
1)6
fil1
76
81
;;7
100
1
, ~ ,
 
11'1
13:!
15."
1 ~ 2
 
17!:'
;ZOO
fterform straightforward tasks
of
a repetitive nature. Knowledge
is
generally acquired
43
50
57
57
66lG
76
87
100
100
115
I."J':
13;
hrough a short period
of
instruction
152
Il',
17:J
20i)
23rJ
Unskilled
50
5i
66
66
76
07
87
100
11';
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l'
13.7
Ire
,
""
1 ~ ' J
 
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1
.1
) ( ~ I l
 
~ l ( '
 
lh·!
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>/.
B. ELEMENTARY VOCATIONAL:
Knowledge
of
standardised
work
routines and
50
57
66
66
76
87
81
10Ll
1 I
~
 
"
r
l
IlL
1')/
57
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)<"'J
methods and general facts and information
andlor
use
of
s i m ~ l e
 
equipment,
'w'
machines and materials. A certain amount
of
insight in the re ationshlp between
57
Flo
76
76
87
100
100
115
, 1/
1:37
1
~ , ) ~
 
175
1l';
200
iJu
21),1
activities is reqUired.
Knowledge
is usually acquired through training on
the
job.;
..
0
:'(\i
Semi-skilled
66
f6
8787 100
115
!
5
n.
' ?
·\Ii.'
1('-;
2(111
''0(,
) ' ~ ( l
 
lhi
'fi4
,IJot
]50
C.
VOCATIONAL:
Knowledge and insight are required for application
of
practical
66
76
87
87100115
,
If;
112
Ir.;?
1'i?
175
?'H'
?lJO
methods and techniques.
work
procedures and
~ r o c e s s e s
 
andior
proficiency in the
?3(.I
261
:,lf4
J(JoI
:150
use
of
matenals, specialised eqUipment and
too
s.
Knowledge
IS
acquired through
76
87
100
100 115 132
137
15i
175
115
200
7
1
')
230
7O,1
10.j
technical training and on
the
job
experience.
3C·l
lS0
.Ion
·
-
Skilled
87100
11'1
115 132
152
152
Ih
'uo
20u
no
'1:1
L6-:!
Ju·l
,:::IJ
: . l ~ , ( J
 
iOO
'4';0
D.
ADVANCED
VOCATIONAL:
Knowledge
of
specialised (generally non-theoretical)
B7
100115 115 132 152
\,,7
IT'"
200
c'c,(I
':30
2(;'1
2 6 · j ~
 
350
100
methods, techniques and processes
is
required. Knowledge is acquired through
.il)11
:;r.·O
4fCl
·
technical training and substantial on
the
job
e ~ e r i e n C e i d e v e l o p m e n t ,
 
part
....
professional qualification or
by
acquiring a
bac
elors
degree
.
100
115 132 132 152 175
In,
20C'
230
2,30
?fi4
J(H
)()4
~ ! i n
 
4(1)
'100
~ ; ) ( )
 
' ~
 
- ~
 
Specialised
115
132 152 152 175 200
;>00
7]0
264
;>"d
104
j
.1)
150
l'i(1
46
1
1R!
'i:.'H
bl,b
.
E.
PROFESSIONAL:
Sufficiency in a technical, scientific or specialised field, as well asan understanding
of
theoretical concepts and principles and their context.
Knowledge
115
137
IG2
152 175
200
2(111
230 264
}64
.304
350
('in
'l:JiJ
,,·,Rn
d It)
S ? ~
 
I-\)!'
IS
normall(' acqUired through professional or
academic
qualification
or
by
a significant
132
15?
1
ttl
175
200 230
:::30
264 304
30.1
l'ill
400
1,00
~ " ' , O
 
573
" ~ ' H
 
i)[Il1
ml1
amount
0
practical knowledge gained through vaned and stretching experience.
Conceptual thinking and working
152
175200
200
230
264
264
304 350
35,)
clOD
460
4130
:;7.'l
6ml
r-
1
IJ((
rno
BOO
·
F.
SEASONED PROFESSIONAL:
proficienc¢, in
a.
specialised field or a broad insight
152
17"
200200
230 264
'64
304 350
i5(,
'11)0
460
,,(,0
~ 2 1 3
 
60B
(,I,'P
?UO
~ O O
Into
the
relatlonshlg between different fields. roficlency
and
insight are acquiredthrough
deep
and road experience built on concepts and principles
or
through
wide
175
200 230
230264 304
104
350 400
1[,1(1
,J{)U
528
')28
f100
700
1r'O
!lOC.!
exposure
to complex
practices and precedents.
_'!(J
Technical specialist
or
major functional manager
700
230
26·1
264
304 350
:'150
400
460
lGC
~ 2 8
 
608
1-i('8
70ll
800
dUli
,r'il
111'i1'
G.
PROFESSIONAL MASTERY:
Determinative mastery
of
concepts. principles
and
200
/ ~ j O
 
264
264
304 350
',50
400 460
'i28
gractices within a specialised field
andlor
authoritative insight
into
the relationships
41'(
608
003
~ ~ o
 
800
~ n n
 
9)0
1056
etween mulhple fields.
Knowledge
is gained through deep development in a
230
26'1
304
3011
350400
pecialised field or through
comprehensive
business experience.
100
460528
5 ~ ) n
 
GOR
700
roc
Hon
920
'}._.J
: o ~ r )
 
1216
Highly specialised
or
general management.
264
3 0 ~
 
350
350
400 460
160
528 608
(;OL\
(flO
800
030e
~ I Z O
 
1056
0;,,(
,
2'6
1400
H. EXCEPTIONAL MASTERY:
Externally recognised mastery
of
concepts
and
264
304
~ 5 \ J
 
350
400
460
1f30
528
60R
" , y ~
 
/ilr
n'ltl
JUO
\1;'0
1056
luSt;
1/16
14(\0
principles, theories and their applications within a scientificlspecialist field andgroundbreaking work within thiS field.
304
350
,100
400 460
528
~ ~ ) B
 
608
700
700
flOn
9?O
lJ20
1056
1216
12
1
1;
I
lUI"
If,(l'
Unique authority
JbO
400
160
1160
528
608
jOfJ
700
1100
S:Wr,
~
 
,
'11
1 n ~ 1 ,
 
1 f 1 ~ ' h
 
'21'1
1401l
11'}(1
1finr·
18-11
ED
© Hay Group, Inc.
A
B
o
E
F
G
H
c
 
Measuring PROBLEM
SOL
VING
Step
1
Find the points for Know-How(from the KH-chart) on the
33
38
I
d3
horizontal axis.
"29
I"
.v
""",
Step
2
".
19
??
2"
.,,....
~
Find the problem solving
.
'.
16
19
,
(
percentage (from the PS-
:. 14
'Ib
19
1,1
II',
chart)
on
the vertical axis.
'.
12
0
1\,)
Step
3
"
q
 
8
The value found
at
the
G
7
f:
50
57
66
tR
8,
100
11')
13L
15?
175
201.'
'JII
,1'>':
.Wh1
)
r : . ~
 
1(
I ~ )
 
';0
57
jiB
7r,
87
100
11"
112
l!i'
I 7',
21]0
).lll
' - ' ~ ~
 
III
350 400 460528
.M
'0
41
.:>0
,T)i
PIO
7(;
?l
111(
11"
112
l'i.
I,
200
230264 304 350 400 460
29
'33
18
'\3
50
5-
GB
-16
BY
lila
115
137
1b7
175 200230264 304350
1111
25
29
:13
3A
4;3
[il.j
51
66
7i;
87
1()(}
115 132 152175
200
1
~ ~ t
 
-1
r
rtf
I
.,.,
r/
25
29
l'
3R
d,
50
6676
87100 115132152
I
,11
.'
-'r,
19
If;
27
19
i ~
 
22
) ~ . l
 
2 ~
 
JJ
)9
'In
33
43
38
50
43
57
50
66
5776
66
87
100
'115
16
87
rCIl
I
I,
.
1,1
16
H!
~ ' )
 
~ . -
75
2933 38
43
so
!Jf
1/
14
16
19
22
25
29
33
38
~
 
. ~
 
fit
10
9
12
10
14
121614
19
16
22
19
25
22
29
)';
J.
..
~
 
. . , ~
 
:<:J
8
79810
g
12
II'
14
12
Ir.
14
18
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~ 2
 
10
2'-'
,
..
; . . : ~
 
I
l.r,
'l;J
ZC,
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lJ
~ H
 
,Ie,
;),
1
";1
tit"
r
ir
If
i,0
t ~ ' 1 1
 
~ r ~
 
115
'11(l
6
7
I
9
10
,
1
1ii
f'
7}
irJ
"I
t
,Ii
,
n
,
,I{
.
,
intersection of these two
5
6
7
i
r
.-')1:'
'.
..
1
:,>.t
I:
onstitute the
points
for
5
5
6
,
"'1
1
11
~ l
 
I
,
~ l ?
445
roblem solving.
1"
PROBLEM SOLVING
Problem Solving
is
the 'self starting' thinking required for analysing, evaluating, reasoning, arriving at and drawing conclusions. Problem Solving dealswith the intensity of the mental process which uses Know-How to identify, define and solve problems. Therefore, for evaluation purposes, ProblemSolving
is
treated as the percentage utilisation
of
Know-How.It has two dimensions:
Thinking
Environment (Freedom
to
Think)
Assesses the extent to which thinking is constrained by the context (business environment, organisation, guidelines, procedures or supervision) within which itmust take place
.a
Thinking Challenge
The complexity
of
the problems encountered and the extent to which original thinking must be employed
to
arrive at solutions.

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