Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
fe-takehome

fe-takehome

Ratings: (0)|Views: 359 |Likes:
Published by Trip Adler

More info:

Published by: Trip Adler on May 13, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/09/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Physics 15b - Final Exam - Take-home portion
Here is the final version of the takehome exam, along with the old problems which I will followup on the inclass exam on Saturday morning.You may work on the take-home problems in study groups, as usual, but you should writethem up individually and pay special attention to the coherence and clarity of your solutions. Youshould also list the students with whom you have discussed the problems. The in-class portion of the exam will follow up on some of these problems (probably not all of them) so they will alsoserve as a study guide for the exam.
We strongly recommend that you think about possiblefollow-up questions these problems.
Some of the followups will be conceptual or calculationaltrue-false questions, but one or two may be a more conventional calculation. We hope that many of the followups will be obvious if you have understood the problems. Obviously, the more you havethought about these problems, the easier it will be for you to complete the inclass exam in the timeyou are given. We strongly urge you to explore them. Ask yourself whether you know what thefields look like. Are there concepts from later chapters that are relevant to problems from earlierchapters? Think about it.At the beginning of exam, you will get a packet containing the questions from the take-home,our solutions, and the follow-up questions. You may consult your take-home solutions during thefollow-up process. At the end of class, you will hand in the packet and your problem set
together
with your take-home inserted into the in-class packet.Because our solutions will be in the packet, you may not modify your take-home solutionsonce you get to the exam. However, there will be a place in the exam packet where you canmake comments on your take-home solutions if you wish to add anything once you have seen oursolutions.Because you can consult your take-home solutions during the exam, you may want to includein your solutions any notes that you think may be helpful to you on the exam, even if they are nota part of your solutions to the take-home problems. This
is
allowed. You can include anythingthat you produce by your own intellectual effort. You may not simply copy something or printa version of someone else’s L
A
TEX file or anything like that. But if you want to write your ownphysics textbook and include it with your solutions, that is fine (though we think that this will notbe an efficient use of your time). You may put your notes in a separate section at the end of yourtake-home, and you
must
hand them in along with the rest of your take-home at the end of thein-class exam.Calculators are allowed for the exam, but should not be essential.1
 
take-home-1
. One can make a “2-dimensional dipole” by putting an infinite charged rod withuniform linear charge density
q/
along the
z
axis and another with linear charge density
q/
parallel to the
z
axis at
y
=
. As
0
for fixed
q
, this produces an interesting electric field,independent of 
z
and with no
z
component.
take-home-1.a
. Show explicitly that the resulting electric field has the form
 
(
x,y,z
) = 2
q
(2
xy,y
2
x
2
,
0)(
x
2
+
y
2
)
2
(1.1)2
 
These 2-dimensional dipoles have properties similar to those of 3-dimensional dipoles. Theparticular analogy we will explore in this problem is to the uniformly polarized sphere, which asyou saw in Purcell, has a constant electric field inside and a dipole field outside. An analogousargument yields the result that an infinite cylinder with radius
R
centered on the
z
axis with po-larization
0
ˆ
y
in the
y
direction has an electric field that is uniform and in the
y
direction insidethe cylinder for
x
2
+
y
2
< R
2
and has the form (1.1) for
x
2
+
y
2
> R
2
. You can prove this byanalogy with the argument illustrated in Purcell’s figure 10.22 by considering the uniformly po-larized cylinder to be built out two oppositely uniformly charged cylinders slightly displaced fromone another in the
y
direction.
take-home-1.b
. Assuming this to be correct, find
q
and the magnitude of the field inside thecylinder in terms of 
0
.3

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download