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Basic Chart

Basic Chart

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Published by: mitulpatel08 on Apr 11, 2010
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01/11/2013

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INTRODUCTION
 
A Namkeen is seen in western culture as a type of food that is not meant to be eatenas part of the main meals of the day (break fast, lunch, and diner). Rather, the foodis intended as a namkeen something to temporarily tide a person¶s hunger and provide a brief supply of energy for the body.
 
 Namkeen are designed to be less perishable, more durable, and more appealing thannatural foods. They often contain substantial amounts of sweeteners, preservatives,and appealing ingredients such as chocolate, peanuts, and specially designed flavors(such as flavored potato chips, other namkeen). Foods manufactured primarily asnamkeen are often classified as junk food: they have little or no nutritional value,and are seen as contributing towards general health and nutrition.
 
The namkeen Industry in market-driven societies such as the United Statesgenerates billion of dollars in revenue each year. The market for namkeen isenormous, and a number of large corporations are constantly struggling to capturelarger shares of the namkeen market. Consequently, heavy promotions are used toconvince consumers to buy namkeen. Namkeen are advertised far more than regular nutritional foods (such as fruit, vegetables, meat, dairy products), and the flashiestTV commercials and advertising campaigns are often designed to sell namkeen.
 
W
ith growing Concerns for nutrition, diet, weight control and general health, some people are making a conscious effort to eat more healthy, natural snacks such asfruit (fresh or dried), vegetables (carrot sticks), nuts and cereal grains (granola,granola bars, rice cakes).
 
H
ISTORY OF NAMKEEN
 
It is believed that the original namkeen recipe was created by George Crum, a chief at the Moon Lake Lodge in Saratoga Springs, New York on August 24, 1853. Hewas fed up with a customer, by some accounts Cornelius Vanderbilt, who continuedto send his fried potatoes back, because they were too thick. Crum decided to slicethe potatoes so thin that couldn¶t be eaten with a fork. Against Crum¶s expectationthe guest was ecstatic about the chips. They became a regular item on the lodge¶smenu under the name Saratoga chips. They soon became popular throughout NewEngland.
 
A mass marketed potato chip could not become popular until the 1920s when themechanical potato peeler was invented. This product was developed by Hermanlay, a traveling salesman in the Southern United States.
 
A potato chip is one of the types of namkeens. The potatoes are cut into very thinslices and deep fried (and recently, backed) until crisp and then cooled and packaged for sale. The simplest chips are just fried and salted, but a wide variety of seasonings (mostly made using MSG and a few herbs/spices) are used to [productvarious µseasoned¶ chips. Potatoes chips generate a sizable amount of revenue in theAmerican namkeen industry, with hundred of millions of dollar worth of the food being sold every year.
 
Another type of potato chip, notably the Pringle¶s brand, is made by pressing doughmade from ground potatoes into the familiar [potato chip shape before frying. Thismakes chips that are very uniform in size and shape, which allows them to bestacked and packaged in rigid tubes. The success of potato chips also gave birth tofried corn chips, with such brands as Fritos, CCs and Doritos dominating themarket.
 
 
In British usage, where these are called ³crisps´, the term ³chips´ refers to whatAmericans call French fries. In Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, bothforms of potato product are simply known as ³chips´, as are the larger ³home-style´ potato chips. Kumara chips are eaten in New Zealand.

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