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Count of Monte Cristo

Count of Monte Cristo

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ProjectGutenberg'sTheCountofMonteCristo,byAlexandreDumas,PereThiseBookisfortheuseofanyoneanywhereatnocostandwithalmostnorestrictionswhatsoever.Youmaycopyit,giveitawayorre-useitunderthetermsoftheProjectGutenbergLicenseincludedwiththiseBookoronlineatwww.gutenberg.orgTitle:TheCountofMonteCristoAuthor:AlexandreDumas,PerePostingDate:November8,2008[EBook#1184]ReleaseDate:January,1998Language:EnglishCharactersetencoding:ASCII***STARTOFTHISPROJECTGUTENBERGEBOOKTHECOUNTOFMONTECRISTO***ProducedbyAnonymousProjectGutenbergVolunteersTHECOUNTOFMONTECRISTObyAlexandreDumas,PereChapter1.Marseilles--TheArrival.Onthe24thofFebruary,1815,thelook-outatNotre-DamedelaGardesignalledthethree-master,thePharaonfromSmyrna,Trieste,andNaples.Asusual,apilotputoffimmediately,androundingtheChateaud'If,gotonboardthevesselbetweenCapeMorgionandRionisland.Immediately,andaccordingtocustom,therampartsofFortSaint-Jeanwerecoveredwithspectators;itisalwaysaneventatMarseillesforashiptocomeintoport,especiallywhenthisship,likethePharaon,hasbeenbuilt,rigged,andladenattheoldPhoceedocks,andbelongstoanownerofthecity.Theshipdrewonandhadsafelypassedthestrait,whichsomevolcanicshockhasmadebetweentheCalasareigneandJarosislands;haddoubledPomegue,andapproachedtheharborundertopsails,jib,andspanker,butsoslowlyandsedatelythattheidlers,withthatinstinctwhichistheforerunnerofevil,askedoneanotherwhatmisfortunecouldhavehappenedonboard.However,thoseexperiencedinnavigationsawplainlythatifanyaccidenthadoccurred,itwasnottothevesselherself,forsheboredownwithalltheevidenceofbeingskilfullyhandled,the
 
anchora-cockbill,thejib-boomguysalreadyeasedoff,andstandingbythesideofthepilot,whowassteeringthePharaontowardsthenarrowentranceoftheinnerport,wasayoungman,who,withactivityandvigilanteye,watchedeverymotionoftheship,andrepeatedeachdirectionofthepilot.Thevaguedisquietudewhichprevailedamongthespectatorshadsomuchaffectedoneofthecrowdthathedidnotawaitthearrivalofthevesselinharbor,butjumpingintoasmallskiff,desiredtobepulledalongsidethePharaon,whichhereachedassheroundedintoLaReservebasin.Whentheyoungmanonboardsawthispersonapproach,helefthisstationbythepilot,and,hatinhand,leanedovertheship'sbulwarks.Hewasafine,tall,slimyoungfellowofeighteenortwenty,withblackeyes,andhairasdarkasaraven'swing;andhiswholeappearancebespokethatcalmnessandresolutionpeculiartomenaccustomedfromtheircradletocontendwithdanger."Ah,isityou,Dantes?"criedthemanintheskiff."What'sthematter?andwhyhaveyousuchanairofsadnessaboard?""Agreatmisfortune,M.Morrel,"repliedtheyoungman,--"agreatmisfortune,formeespecially!OffCivitaVecchiawelostourbraveCaptainLeclere.""Andthecargo?"inquiredtheowner,eagerly."Isallsafe,M.Morrel;andIthinkyouwillbesatisfiedonthathead.ButpoorCaptainLeclere--""Whathappenedtohim?"askedtheowner,withanairofconsiderableresignation."Whathappenedtotheworthycaptain?""Hedied.""Fellintothesea?""No,sir,hediedofbrain-feverindreadfulagony."Thenturningtothecrew,hesaid,"Bearahandthere,totakeinsail!"Allhandsobeyed,andatoncetheeightortenseamenwhocomposedthecrew,sprangtotheirrespectivestationsatthespankerbrailsandouthaul,topsailsheetsandhalyards,thejibdownhaul,andthetopsailclewlinesandbuntlines.Theyoungsailorgavealooktoseethathisorderswerepromptlyandaccuratelyobeyed,andthenturnedagaintotheowner."Andhowdidthismisfortuneoccur?"inquiredthelatter,resumingtheinterruptedconversation."Alas,sir,inthemostunexpectedmanner.Afteralongtalkwiththeharbor-master,CaptainLeclereleftNaplesgreatlydisturbedinmind.Intwenty-fourhourshewasattackedbyafever,anddiedthreedaysafterwards.Weperformedtheusualburialservice,andheisathisrest,sewnupinhishammockwithathirty-sixpoundshotathisheadandhisheels,offElGiglioisland.Webringtohiswidowhisswordandcrossofhonor.Itwasworthwhile,truly,"addedtheyoungmanwithamelancholysmile,"tomakewaragainsttheEnglishfortenyears,andto
 
dieinhisbedatlast,likeeverybodyelse.""Why,yousee,Edmond,"repliedtheowner,whoappearedmorecomfortedateverymoment,"weareallmortal,andtheoldmustmakewayfortheyoung.Ifnot,why,therewouldbenopromotion;andsinceyouassuremethatthecargo--""Isallsafeandsound,M.Morrel,takemywordforit;andIadviseyounottotake25,000francsfortheprofitsofthevoyage."Then,astheywerejustpassingtheRoundTower,theyoungmanshouted:"Standbytheretolowerthetopsailsandjib;brailupthespanker!"Theorderwasexecutedaspromptlyasitwouldhavebeenonboardaman-of-war."Letgo--andclueup!"Atthislastcommandallthesailswerelowered,andthevesselmovedalmostimperceptiblyonwards."Now,ifyouwillcomeonboard,M.Morrel,"saidDantes,observingtheowner'simpatience,"hereisyoursupercargo,M.Danglars,comingoutofhiscabin,whowillfurnishyouwitheveryparticular.Asforme,Imustlookaftertheanchoring,anddresstheshipinmourning."Theownerdidnotwaitforasecondinvitation.HeseizedaropewhichDantesflungtohim,andwithanactivitythatwouldhavedonecredittoasailor,climbedupthesideoftheship,whiletheyoungman,goingtohistask,lefttheconversationtoDanglars,whonowcametowardstheowner.Hewasamanoftwenty-fiveortwenty-sixyearsofage,ofunprepossessingcountenance,obsequioustohissuperiors,insolenttohissubordinates;andthis,inadditiontohispositionasresponsibleagentonboard,whichisalwaysobnoxioustothesailors,madehimasmuchdislikedbythecrewasEdmondDanteswasbelovedbythem."Well,M.Morrel,"saidDanglars,"youhaveheardofthemisfortunethathasbefallenus?""Yes--yes:poorCaptainLeclere!Hewasabraveandanhonestman.""Andafirst-rateseaman,onewhohadseenlongandhonorableservice,asbecameamanchargedwiththeinterestsofahousesoimportantasthatofMorrel&Son,"repliedDanglars."But,"repliedtheowner,glancingafterDantes,whowaswatchingtheanchoringofhisvessel,"itseemstomethatasailorneedsnotbesooldasyousay,Danglars,tounderstandhisbusiness,forourfriendEdmondseemstounderstanditthoroughly,andnottorequireinstructionfromanyone.""Yes,"saidDanglars,dartingatEdmondalookgleamingwithhate."Yes,heisyoung,andyouthisinvariablyself-confident.Scarcelywasthecaptain'sbreathoutofhisbodywhenheassumedthecommandwithoutconsultinganyone,andhecausedustoloseadayandahalfattheIslandofElba,insteadofmakingforMarseillesdirect.""Astotakingcommandofthevessel,"repliedMorrel,"thatwashisdutyascaptain'smate;astolosingadayandahalfofftheIslandofElba,hewaswrong,unlessthevesselneededrepairs.""ThevesselwasinasgoodconditionasIam,andas,Ihopeyouare,

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