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China - Market Analysis Report_EN

China - Market Analysis Report_EN

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Published by Todor Arbov

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Published by: Todor Arbov on Apr 13, 2010
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InternationalMarketsBureau
The Urban Chinese Consumer
 Behaviour, Attitudes andPerceptions TowardFood Products
MARKET ANALYSIS REPORT | APRIL 2010
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
CHINA
EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES
PAGE 2
GLOBAL
 
TRADE
 
POSITION
 
3
CANADA’S TRADE
RELATIONSHIP WITH CHINA
3
 
D
EMOGRAPHICS
 
4
 
Population 4,5 Ethnicity 5,6 Education 6 Households 6,7 
 
Lifestyle & Health 7,8 Economy 8,9Political Environment 9 
CONSUMPTION
 
AND
 E
XPENDITURES
 
9,10 
 
Little Emperors &Empresses 10,11Expenditures Overview 11-15 Consumption Tastesand Preferences 15-19
T
RENDS
 
19Snack Foods 19,20 Foodservice 20 Green Food, Hazard-freeFood & Organics 20,21Recessionary Spending 22 
C
ONCLUSION
 
22 
K
EY
R
ESOURCES
 
23-26 

INSIDE THIS REPORT
"Be born in SuzhouLive in HangzhouEat in GuangzhouDie in Liuzhou"
 
 
The Urban Chinese Consumer 
 Behaviour, Attitudes and Perceptions Toward Food Products

CHINA IN BRIEF
 
Over many centuries, China has evolved from an agrarianeconomy into a modern society, characterized bytechnological advances and international influences.Today, new agri-
food opportunities are emerging as China‘s
economy, political environment and socioeconomic realitycontinue to change. Chinese consumers are now poised todevelop new tastes and demand more global food.Chinese consumers are both savvy and discerning, however,they tend to exhibit preferences and behaviours that are rooted
in the rich cultural traditions of China‘s past.With the world‘s largest population and a vast and varied
geographical area, the characteristics of China and itspopulation are diverse. Centuries of adaptation have created awide range of lifestyles and behaviours, particularly in densely-populated urban areas. As a result, it is not practical to treat thepopulation of China as a single consumer market. For thisreason, this report is focused on the behaviours and attitudes of urban consumers in Mainland China only.
China‘s complex and unsettled past has been shaped by a
varied range of influences, from feudal warlords to socialism.
Throughout China‘s long and sometimes turbulent history, the
one constant has been food. Food has always played animportant role in society, from banquets marking the birth of achild to celebrations of regional or national importance. The
common greeting in China is not ―How are you?‖ but ―Have youeaten yet?‖ This question dates back to times when food was in
short supply and people often went hungry.
In terms of physical size, China is the world‘s fourth largest
country, following Russia, Canada and the United States (US)(The World Fact Book, 2009). It is divided into severaladministrative divisions: 23 provinces, 5 autonomousregions, and 4 municipalities. In addition, there are twospecial administrative regions
Hong Kong and Macau.China borders on several countries, including India, Mongolia,Russia, Laos, Kazakhstan, North Korea and Vietnam. Its coastsrest on several seas, including the East China Sea, the YellowSea and the South China Sea. As a result, the climate is verydiverse, ranging from tropical in the south, to sub-arctic in thenorth, making the country subject to droughts, floods, andfrequent typhoons. Climate change and urban sprawl are
 
 
PAGE 3
expected to shrink crop yields and the amount of available farmland, which will in turn
reduce the country‘s domestic food supply (Reuters, August 22, 2007).
 The Chinese government has encouraged investment in the rural economy and theagricultural sector is growing at approximately 3% per year. The government growth target for the agricultural sector is just over 5% annually. However, due to environmental challenges, such as thedesertification of arable land and drought, growth has been slower than expected.
China boasts the world‘s second largest economy. Agriculture accounts for nearly 11% of that economy and
employs more than 40% of the labour force. China is a major exporter and importer of agri-food
products, as well as the world‘s largest exporter of seafood products, making it a market with many
opportunities for Canadian agri-business.

China is a net importer of agri-food and seafood products. In 2008, its agri-food and seafood trade
deficit was over US $18 billion. China‘s agri
-food and seafood imports have been growing over the pastfive years at an average of 21% a year (Global Trade Atlas, 2009).

China‘s key agri
-food and seafood imports in 2008 were soybeans, cotton, refined palm oil, crudesoybean oil, and wool. Key suppliers in 2008 were the United States, Brazil, Argentina, Malaysia andAustralia.

Major processed food imports in China include: palm oil, soybean oil, fish meal, beef hides and frozenfish. Malaysia, the United States and Argentina are the largest suppliers of processed food to China,
accounting for approximately 41% of China‘s processed food imports (Global Trade Atlas 2009).
 There is great growth potential for high-quality Canadian food products among discerning Chinese
consumers. China is an increasingly important trading partner of Canada and is Canada‘s fourth largest
export market for general merchandise products. In 2008, these exports totalled $10.5 billion and accountedfor over 2% of overall exports, up from $4.8 billion in 2003.China is also an important export market for Canadian agri-food and fish and seafood. In 2008, exports toChina of agri-
food products exceeded $1.5 billion, up from $400 million in 2003. China was Canada‘s fourth
largest export market for agri-
food products, accounting for almost 4% of Canada‘s total agri
-food exports.
Canada‘s exports of fish and seafood to China are also important but have shown less rapid growth than
exports of agri-food products. In 2008, Canada exported $258 million in fish and seafood products to China,
up from $255 million in 2003. This accounted for 7% of Canada‘s total fish and seafood exports, makingChina Canada‘s third largest export market for fish and seafood products.
 In 2008:

Canada‘s top agri
-food and seafood exports to China were canola seeds, canola oil, snow crabs,soybeans, and peas.

Canada registered an agri-food trade surplus of CAD $0.9 billion with China.

Canada‘s top agri
-food and seafood imports from China include: apple juice, frozen fish meat, frozenshrimp, mushrooms and sole fillets (Statistics Canada 2009).

Processed food imports continued a five year growth trend and reached US $25 billion.

Canada supplied approximately three percent of China‘s processed food imports.

GLOBAL TRADE POSITION
 

CANADA’S TRADE RELATIONSHIP WITH CHINA
 

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