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TDP Newsletter Spring 2010

TDP Newsletter Spring 2010

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Thames Discovery Programme Newsletter Spring 2010
Thames Discovery Programme Newsletter Spring 2010

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Published by: Thames Discovery Programme on Apr 14, 2010
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The Thames Discovery Programme is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and managed by the Thames Estuary Partnership with support from the Thames Explorer Trust 
welcome
to the TDP newsletter - Spring 2010
Join TDP on site this summer!
We
!
re planning a packed schedule this summer, makingthe most of some good low tides and (hopefully!) sunnyweather, and you are welcome to attend as many or asfew sessions as you are able.The aims of the summer season are twofold. Firstly, thefieldwork will give all of you the opportunity toconsolidate and build upon the initial training undertakenat Custom House, Isleworth, Charlton, Strand-on-the-Green, Bankside or Trig Lane, and the fieldwork lastsummer at Alderman Stairs, Putney and Bermondsey.Secondly, we are expanding the number of key sitesavailable for detailed recording through the work atBurrell
!
s Wharf, the Tower of London, Greenwich, Kew,Woolwich and Rotherhithe.There will also be opportunities to join the FROG teamsacross London for work at their key sites.As always, please keep an eye on the website for updatedinformation regarding events, fieldwork and volunteeropportunities. I look forward to seeing you out on site thissummer!The dates and places of the fieldwork are as follows:Week 1: Charlton (17-21 May
2010
)Week 2: Burrell
!
s Wharf (14-18 June
2010
) Week 3: Tower of London (12-16 July
2010
)Week 4: Greenwich Royal Palace (11-16 August
2010
)Week 5: Kew/Strand-on-the-Green (23-29 August
2010
)Week 6: Woolwich (9-14 September
2010
)Week 7: Rotherhithe (25-29 September
2010
)These sessions are open to any FROG member who hascompleted Days 1 and 2 of training; please email EliottWragg (Field Officer) at e.wragg@thamesdiscovery.org tobook or call 0207 566
 
9310.For those of you who have not yet had the chance tocomplete Day 2 training, the following weekend dates areavailable:Greenwich Royal Palace: 14-15 August
2010
Kew/Strand-on-the-Green: 28-29 August
"
2010
""
Rotherhithe: 25-26 September
2010
NEWS
Hello, we are now moving into Spring, better light andsome warmer weather, so TDP activities on theforeshore will increase.
!
For those of you
who
havecompleted the FROG training, details of theforthcoming FROG summer fieldwork season areenclosed.
!
If you are interested in taking part, Nathalie& Eliott will be very pleased to hear from you.Please keep an eye on our website for the latest news,foreshore walks and events, and further developmentsin our Riverpedia research project.
!
 If you have any questions about the project, pleasecontact us: 0207 566 9310 or email:enquiries@thamesdiscovery.orgMany thanks to all the FROG contributions to thisnewsletter - if you would like to add anything to futureeditions, please get in touch!Best wishes
Lorna
Archaeology Outreach OfficerThames Discovery Programme
 
The Thames Discovery Programme is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and managed by the Thames Estuary Partnership with support from the Thames Explorer Trust 
welcome
to the TDP newsletter - Spring 2010
SAVE THE DATE!Events
"Along the Black Waterfront"Riverpedia Seminar26th April 2010 6pm – 7pmRoom 612 Institute of Archaeology,UCL
Seminar on the history of the Blackcommunity in London and the riverThames, with author and researcher onBlack history, S. I Martin.S. I Martin is the author of Britain's SlaveTrade, and three novels, IncomparableWorld, Jupiter Williams, and JupiterAmidships.
To book a ticket, please either visit ourevent booking website directly:
http://www.eventbrite.com/event/ 610549169call us on:
0207 566
9
310
 or email us at
 
riverpedia@thamesdiscovery.org
Find out more about the Riverpedia project on the Thames Discovery Programme website: www.thamesdiscovery.org/riverpedia 
FROGS Launch a New Site
We visited a new part of the foreshore, at Syon Reach,Brentford on 29th, 30th & 31st March 2010. We FROGShopped across the tidal water meadow.The objective was to trace all the features recorded in theThames Archaeological Survey, check for and recordchanges and to locate them accurately using GPStechniques, provided by MOLA Geomatics.The GLSMR includes about 50 entries for Syon Reach,including many prehistoric artefacts and signs of humanactivity.
!
Naturally,we are hoping toadd to the list.English Naturehas given themeadow andforeshore SSSIstatus andpermission had tobe obtained fromthem to carry outthe work.Syon AbbeyResearchAssociates, agroup ofresearchersinterested in thehistory of SyonAbbey (1426 -1539) has helped to arrange access, thanks to the co-operation of the Syon Estate. You can read more aboutthis fieldwork on the FROGBlog.
Laurie ElvinFROG MemberPlease contact Laurie Elvin for more informationon 07875 123274
 
The Thames Discovery Programme is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and managed by the Thames Estuary Partnership with support from the Thames Explorer Trust 
welcome
to the TDP newsletter - Spring 2010
Ship Breaking on the Thames
The
!
industry of
!
ship breaking is as old asthat of ship building itself; as vesselssuccumbed to the cumulative pressures ofhard use and the effects of marine life andthe water they were either hulked, brokenup for re-use or even buried. Shipbreaking, however, has never been asglamorous as building state of the artmodern vessels and has, therefore, beenlittle documented and investigated.One of the most obvious pieces ofevidence of ship breaking is Turner
"
sfantastic painting of the Fighting Temerairefrom 1839. From the time of the close ofthe Crimean War in 1856 however, westart to get a little more documentaryevidence. This was the great period of thetransition from sail to steam. Also the newexplosive shells, used in naval battleswere so destructive that there was aneed for greater protection for navalships. Armour was added to somewooden ships, which were then knownas the “Ironclads”, more ships were builtentirely of iron; the best known of thesebeing HMS Warrior. Even before this ithad become increasingly difficult tosource mature oak from Britain after themassive Napoleonic shipbuildingprogrammes, and hardwood had beensourced from the Baltic and more exoticlocations such as West Africa and theMalabar coast of India.The old wooden sailing ships becamesurplus to requirements as the new ironships were introduced.
!
This increasedthe demand for ship breaking on theThames, which coincided with the drop inwooden ship building.The switch to iron and later steel vesselsmeant ships could now
be
built to hithertounthinkable sizes; the Thames shipyardswere not large enough to launch the largest ships and equally it became more economic to build iron andsteel ships in the north of England with close proximity to iron and coal deposits.
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Continued…..
The big freeze Anchor and Hope Wharf, Charlton, 1895National Maritime Museum Flickr collection FROG fieldwork at Charlton, 2009 by Hugh Dulley 
RIVERPEDIA

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