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John Jay Magazine (Spring 2010)

John Jay Magazine (Spring 2010)

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Published by jtaveras
John Jay Magazine (Spring 2010)
John Jay Magazine (Spring 2010)

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Published by: jtaveras on Apr 16, 2010
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05/18/2012

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John Jay Magazine
SPRING 2010
EDUCATING FOR JUSTICE
John Jay College
The CiTy UniversiTy of new york
of Criminal Justice
TERRORISM
FAVELAS
CALL-INS
SACRED VALUES
AL QAEDAILICIAS
SUICIDE BOMBERS
GANGVIOLENCTORTURE
RACIAL RECONCILIATION
SUBVERSIVE LEARNING
REENTRY THROUGH THE ARTS
CRISIS INTERVENTION
OPEN-AIR DRUG MARKETS
 
John Jay College
THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
of Criminal Justice
PRESIDENT
Jeremy travis
, ... ... I..
President’s Letter MultifacetedPhenomenon
TERRORISM—
Like the John Jay ResearchersStudying It—Has Many FacesFor Reducing Violence,It Takes a 
NETWORK CRIMINAL JUSTICE& THE THEATER 
 At John Jay, A Perfect Fit
RIO’S FAVELAS
Field Notes of a Fulbright Scholar  ALUMNI WORTH NOTING ALUMNI CLASS NOTES
1258112628
CONTENTS
John Jay Magazine
EDUCATING FOR JUSTICE
Dear Friends:As we complete the 2009 – 2010 academic year, we can proudly say that the changes at John Jay are simply breathtaking.What’s more, we are continuing to garner more public and private recognition for our scholarship and our ability to shape practice.This past year alone, our faculty scholars received more than $10 million in grants from a broad array of agencies, includingthe National Institutes of Health, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Education, the National ScienceFoundation, the National Institute of Justice and the Bureau of Justice Assistance.Such recognition is due in large part to the revitalization of the College. Highlights of these accomplishments include:
Improving Student Success
Five years ago, John Jay’s entering freshman class consisted of 1,182 baccalaureate students. This fall we enrolled 1,657baccalaureate freshmen, a 40 percent increase. Based on this success, the College has officially closed associate degreeprograms and will seek senior college designation next fall. Simultaneously, working with the six CUNY community colleges,John Jay has created joint degree programs in criminal justice, forensic science and forensic financial analysis. These educationalpartnerships, collectively called the CUNY Justice Academy, will enable us to expand access to criminal justice programs acrossthe university.
Reinvigorating Faculty
This fall the College welcomed 36 new full-time faculty members. With their arrival John Jay reached another milestone — since2004, our ranks of full-time faculty have grown from 335 to 449, a 33 percent increase. Fully 50 percent of the College’s full-timefaculty have been hired over the past five years. These new faculty come from premier doctoral programs around the world,committed to excellence in scholarship and teaching, and eager to join the John Jay community. They are a critical building blockof a revitalized John Jay College.
Retooling Core Academic Programs
John Jay has added liberal arts majors in English, Economics, Gender Studies and Global History, with Philosophy, Law andSociety, American Studies, Anthropology, Latin American and Latina/o Studies and Sociology in the pipeline. These new majorsare receiving positive reviews from academic colleagues around the country and willdistinguish the John Jay undergraduate education in the coming decades. The College is alsoexpanding options at the graduate level with two new master’s programs — one in ForensicMental Health Counseling and another in International Crime and Justice and certificates inForensic Psychology and Forensic Accounting. In addition, this fall, the College launched itsfirst online degree program — the MPA-Inspector General Program.In the next few months, we will complete work on our Master Plan titled “John Jay @ 50,”which will address questions surrounding the core issue of how John Jay when celebratingits 50th birthday in 2014 will be different, while remaining true to its mission of “educatingfor justice.”At this moment in our history, we particularly appreciate the encouragement we receive fromour alumni, friends and supporters. And, with the wealth of exciting developments andaccomplishments we are now witnessing, there has never been a better time to be part ofthe John Jay community.
John Jay Magazine 
is a publicationof Marketing and Development,published twice a year and distributedfree to alumni and friends ofJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice.
 
899 TENTH AVENUE NEW YORK, NY 10019 T.212.237.8600 F.212.237.8607 JTRAVIS@JJAY.CUNY.EDU
President
Jeremy Travis
Vice Presidentfor Marketing and Development
 Vivien Hoexter 
Executive Director of Communications& Editor
Christine Godek 
Senior Writer
Jennifer Nislow 
Contributing Writers
Peter DodenhoffMarie Rosen
Photography Coordinator
Doreen Viñas Pineda 
Alumni Contributor
Sharice Conway 
Production Coordinator
Kathy Willis
Designer
JRenacia 
 
Scott Atran, a Presidential Scholar inSociology and research fellow at the Centerwho developed the hypothesis, these intrinsicbeliefs form the moral frame by which asociety functions. It is because of thissignificance that they may hold a key toresolving seemingly intractable disputes inthe Middle East.
Atran became interested in thepossibility that these conflicts werenot being resolved becausenegotiators were making the mistakeof attaching material wealth to whatboth sides viewed as their people’s“sacred values.”
“You give something and I give something inreturn — quid pro quo,” said Atran. “In thestandard negotiation, you leave the valuequestions for last….I find that that doesn’tseem to work. So the idea was to try tosystematically explore this in the world’sconflict zones, especially Palestine and Israel,which is the world’s symbolic knot at thisparticular moment in world history.”In 2007, Atran and his colleagues beganinterviewing government and political leadersin the Middle East, pushing them to see howfar they would go in negotiations andlistening to their reasons for accepting or notaccepting a deal. Many of their subjects, henoted, had surprisingly personal reasons forsaying “no.”Prior to September 11, 2001, the Collegewas one of a handful of institutions in theUnited States addressing the question ofwhat compelled individuals to committerrorist acts. John Jay in the interveningyears has become a home for scholarswhose work examines the subject throughthe lenses of sociology, law enforcement,psychology and history, and a research hubfor the investigation of the phenomenonthrough its Center on Terrorism.The Center, created in the wake of theattacks, serves as an extension of John Jay’smission by making the knowledge it gathersserve a useful public purpose. To that end, itoffers an interdisciplinary MA certificateprogram in the study of terrorism that drawsstudents from all over the world, a FridaySeminar Series that examines a differentaspect of terrorism each week, and researchfellowships to scholars investigating itsvarious elements.According to Professor Charles B. Strozier,the Center’s director, “Terrorism is not a field,it’s not a discipline. It’s a problem in theworld.”
Sociology
The most deeply held values we have aboutour relationships with other human beings,particularly in our own society, can be calledour “sacred values.” According to Professor
32
Professor Scott Atran
Transfiguration
by GN MillerWorld Trade Center, NYC afterterrorist attack
Terrorismis not a field,it’s not a discipline.It’s a problemin the world.
Terrorist crimes committed in the United States and abroad are perpetrated by manydifferent actors with diverse ethnicities, nationalities, religions and motivations. Theyrange from right-wing extremists to Islamic jihadists to separatists, among others.
The multifaceted nature of the problem haslong caught the attention of researchers at John Jay.
The most deeply held values we have aboutour relationships with other human beings,particularly inour own society,can be called
our “sacred values.”
World Trade Center survivors
MULTIFACETED PHENOMENON
TERRORISM—
LIKE THE JOHN JAY RESEARCHERS STUDYING IT—HAS MANY FACES
By Jennifer Nislow

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