Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
69Activity

Table Of Contents

TRANSLATION DEPENDS ON TRANSFER
Transfer and translation work on distance
Transfer is a precondition for translation
Exactly what is transferred?
Translation can be intralingual or interlingual
Translation can be approached from transfer
Transfer can be approached through translation
How these approaches are used in this essay
EQUIVALENCE DEFINES TRANSLATION
Equivalence could be all things to all theorists
Equivalence is directional and subjectless
Equivalence is asymmetrical
Value is an economic term
Equivalence is an economic term
Equivalence is not a natural relation between systems
Equivalence has become unfashionable
The translator is anonymous
The utterance “I am translating” is necessarily false
Can interpreters say they are frightened?
Third persons allow translators to talk
Does anyone speak Redford’s language?
Third persons can conflict
Ideal equivalence can be challenged
Quantity is of practical and theoretical importance
A. Transliteration (absolute equivalence)
The proper name is sometimes improper
B. Double presentation (strong relative equivalence)
Relative equivalence presents asymmetry
Relative equivalence tends to paraphrase (“La Movida” moves)
Why translational paraphrase tends to stop at sentence level
C. Single presentation (weak relative equivalence)
Single presentation hides at least one quantity
Notes are expansion by another name
Abbreviation and deletion can be difficult to justify
Authoritative subjectivity allows addition and deletion
Expansion and addition can run into political trouble
D. Multiple presentation (contradictory equivalence)
Some translations become originals
Some translations last as monuments
Transfer and translation work against belonging
There are no solo performances
Distance can break performance
Transferability has second-person thresholds
Textual worlds increase transferability
Transfer may call for explication
Absolute explicitness is rarely transferred
Belonging may be a tone of voice
Belonging may work on implicit knowledge
Belonging may work on forgotten knowledge
The tongue carries forgotten belonging
Embeddedness is complex belonging
Cultural embeddedness conditions translational difficulty
Texts belong
Movement is change
Texts do not fall from the sky
Textual movements are not natural needs
Parallel texts are not really translations
Why “La Movida” moved
Texts are like sails raised to the wind
Networks are complex, quantitative and contradictory
Regimes are ways of representing and acting within networks
Translation histories are deceptively diachronic
Translation plays an active historical role
Translation history could be based on regimes
TRANSLATION RULES ARE ETHICAL DECISIONS
Ethics is a professional concern
Translators are rarely above suspicion
Inspiration may have come to isolated cells on Pharos
Nec translatores debent esse soli
Isolated inspiration is also regulated
There can be no ethics of linguistic neutrality
To translate is to attempt improvement
Translators’ first loyalty should not fall one side or the other
Professional detachment is attachment to a profession
Translation has purposes of its own
Translators could be taught in terms of translational regimes
TRANSLATORS THEORIZE
Theorization is part of translational competence
Theorization is the basis of translation criticism
Translation errors are not necessarily mistakes
Critical theorization is a negation of transfer and translation
Theory first expresses doubt
Explicit theorization responds to conflict in practice
Linguistics is of limited use
Generality should begin from translation
Translation theory should be pertinent to translation
Translation theory should not lecture translators
Translation theory should address the social sciences
REFERENCES
INDEX
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Translation and Text Transfer

Translation and Text Transfer

Ratings: (0)|Views: 6,706|Likes:
Published by urbanom
More than just a linguistic activity, translation is one of the main ways in which intercultural
relationships are formed and transformed.
The study of translation should thus involve far more than merely defining and testing
linguistic equivalents.
It should ask what relation translation has to the texts that move between cultures; it
should have ideas about why texts move and how translated texts can represent such
movement; and it should be able to inquire into the ethics of intercultural relations and
how translators should respond them.
In short, by relating the work of translators to the problematics of intercultural transfer,
translation studies should take its rightful interdisciplinary place among the social sciences.
But what kind of conceptual geometry might make this development possible?
Refusing simple answers, this book sees the relation between translation and transfer
as a complex phenomenon that must be described on both the semiotic and material
levels. Various connected approaches then conceptualize this relationship as being
causal, economic, discursive, quantitative, political, historical, ethical and epistemological...
and indeed translational. Individual chapters address each of these aspects, placing
particular emphasis on phenomena that are mostly ignored by contemporary theories.
The result is a dense but highly suggestive and hopefully stimulating vision of translation
studies.
Anthony Pym was born in Perth, Western Australia, in 1956. He studied at local universities
and at Harvard before completing his doctorate in the Sociology of Literature at
the École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He currently teaches Translation
Studies in Spain.
More than just a linguistic activity, translation is one of the main ways in which intercultural
relationships are formed and transformed.
The study of translation should thus involve far more than merely defining and testing
linguistic equivalents.
It should ask what relation translation has to the texts that move between cultures; it
should have ideas about why texts move and how translated texts can represent such
movement; and it should be able to inquire into the ethics of intercultural relations and
how translators should respond them.
In short, by relating the work of translators to the problematics of intercultural transfer,
translation studies should take its rightful interdisciplinary place among the social sciences.
But what kind of conceptual geometry might make this development possible?
Refusing simple answers, this book sees the relation between translation and transfer
as a complex phenomenon that must be described on both the semiotic and material
levels. Various connected approaches then conceptualize this relationship as being
causal, economic, discursive, quantitative, political, historical, ethical and epistemological...
and indeed translational. Individual chapters address each of these aspects, placing
particular emphasis on phenomena that are mostly ignored by contemporary theories.
The result is a dense but highly suggestive and hopefully stimulating vision of translation
studies.
Anthony Pym was born in Perth, Western Australia, in 1956. He studied at local universities
and at Harvard before completing his doctorate in the Sociology of Literature at
the École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He currently teaches Translation
Studies in Spain.

More info:

Published by: urbanom on Apr 17, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/04/2013

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Page 5 is not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 10 to 47 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 52 to 100 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 105 to 213 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (69)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
nooooon liked this
Hami Sibagariang liked this
chichito2000 liked this
INo Amq Ambones liked this
mogessol liked this
mogessol liked this
amandatambun liked this
amandatambun liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->