Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin - Dec03leb

FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin - Dec03leb

Ratings: (0)|Views: 139|Likes:
Features

Pickpockets, Their Victims, and the Transit Police
By David Young
Law enforcement officers can help citizens reduce their chances of becoming victims of pocket-picking.

When an Informant’s Tip Gives Officers Probable Cause to Arrest Drug Traffickers
By Edward M. Hendrie
The degree of corroboration necessary for officers to establish probable cause depends on the informant’s credibility and basis of knowledge.
Features

Pickpockets, Their Victims, and the Transit Police
By David Young
Law enforcement officers can help citizens reduce their chances of becoming victims of pocket-picking.

When an Informant’s Tip Gives Officers Probable Cause to Arrest Drug Traffickers
By Edward M. Hendrie
The degree of corroboration necessary for officers to establish probable cause depends on the informant’s credibility and basis of knowledge.

More info:

Published by: FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin on Apr 21, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/22/2013

pdf

text

original

 
1
8
Departments
ISSN 0014-5688USPS 383-310
Features
December 2003Volume 72Number 12
United StatesDepartment of JusticeFederal Bureau of InvestigationWashington, DC 20535-0001Robert S. Mueller IIIDirector
Contributors’ opinions and statementsshould not be considered anendorsement by the FBI for any policy,program, or service.The attorney general has determinedthat the publication of this periodical isnecessary in the transaction of thepublic business required by law. Useof funds for printing this periodical hasbeen approved by the director of theOffice of Management and Budget.The
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
(ISSN-0014-5688) is publishedmonthly by the Federal Bureau ofInvestigation, 935 PennsylvaniaAvenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.20535-0001. Periodicals postage paidat Washington, D.C., and additionalmailing offices. Postmaster: Sendaddress changes to Editor,
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
, FBI Academy,Madison Building, Room 209,Quantico, VA 22135.
Editor 
John E. Ott
Associate Editors 
Cynthia L. LewisDavid W. MacWhaBunny S. Morris
Art Director 
Denise Bennett Smith
Assistant Art Director 
Stephanie L. Lowe
Staff Assistant 
Linda W. SzumiloThis publication is produced bymembers of the Law EnforcementCommunication Unit, Training andDevelopment Division.
Internet Address
leb@fbiacademy.edu
Cover Photo
 © 
Tribute
 
Send article submissions to Editor,
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
, FBIAcademy, Madison Building, Room209, Quantico, VA 22135.
 
December 2003 / 1
ickpockets have pursued their trade almost as longas people have carried 
P
money. Many pickpockets begintheir careers at a young age and,after many years of experience,acquire the patience, dexterity,and knowledge of human be-havior to become successfulcriminals.Pocket-picking is most com-mon in places where largegroups of people gather. Trans- portation facilities, such as busterminals and railroad stations,are favorite hunting grounds for  pickpockets, but a departmentstore, public arena, or city streetalso can supply enough potentialvictims.
1
Several factors inherentin public areas increase opportu-nities for a pickpocket to commita theft, while other variables re-duce the risk that the pickpocketwill be caught, prosecuted, and  penalized in a manner consistentwith the seriousness of thecrime.
Victim Profile
The authors research re-vealed that females became pickpocket victims more oftenthan males. Most victims wereapproximately 30 years old and used the railroad as a means of transportation. The most likely places for a theft to occur wereon station escalators and plat-forms and on trains near thedoors of the car. Because a trans- portation facility is a public ac-commodation, everyone has al-most unrestricted access to thecommon areas of the terminal.Thousands of people passthrough these areas each day,and holiday travel dramaticallyincreases customer volume.Pickpockets spend hours in ter-minals watching the crowds and 
Pickpockets, Their Victims,and the Transit Police 
By DAVID YOUNG
 © 
David Young
 
2 / FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
searching for potential targets.Research did not find significantcorrelation between a victimsrace and victimization.Pickpocket incidents oc-curred most often during peak shopping times, which usuallyoccurred outside the station, or during evening rush hours.These victims often reported thetheft to railroad police officers because of a highly visible sub-station in the main concourse of the terminal. After people re- ported a pickpocket crime, pre-liminary interviews revealed thatmost victims had their walletsexposed during the 30 minutes prior to the theft. Then, they puttheir wallets back in their bags, purses, or knapsacks on topof other items, making the wal-lets easily accessible once the pickpocket opened the bag.Closing devices, such as snaps, buckles, zippers, or velcro, proved minor obstacles for the professional pickpocket.Victims often unintention-ally placed bags in an exposed  position on their person, and most victims carried the bag over one shoulder. The pickpocketsurveilled the victims and waited for their bags to slip into a vul-nerable position to the rear of thevictims, instead of at a more se-cure place under their arms or toward the front of their bodies.A wallet placed in an outer com- partment of a knapsack and wornover the shoulders presents aneasy target for even the novice pickpocket.Incidents increased duringcold weather and around holi-days. In cold weather, both the pickpocket and the victim wear more clothing, which may facili-tate the pickpockets ability tocommit the crime. The extra lay-ers reduce the victims sense o bodily awareness and provide pickpockets with added cover byshielding movements during thecommission of the crime or pro-viding a place to hide the stolen property if they get caught. Addi-tionally, pickpockets simply mayshed an outer layer of clothingfor one of a different color thatthey are wearing underneath,thereby confusing identification by the victims and in broadcaststo other patrol officers. Pick- pockets also use this tactic inwarm weather; the outer garmenteither can be discarded or hiddenin a plastic bag carried by theoffender.The most significant factor in the victim profile possiblymay be psychological. A crowd-ed terminal creates a distractingenvironment. People are packed together in cramped waiting ar-eas listening for public an-nouncements, watching a depar-ture, carrying packages, or talking on a cellular telephone.The stations environment cre-ates a sensory overload. Further,the victims, conditioned by therush hour atmosphere of the sta-tion, are accustomed to the close physical proximity of other  people. Those who use masstransit expect to be bumped and  jostled. The victim also expectsto have even less personal spacewhen descending the escalatorsand riding the train, focusingmore on boarding the train and 
“ ” 
Officer Young, a former criminal investigator with the Amtrak Police Department in New Jersey, now serves as a civilian criminal defense investigator in New Jersey.
Officers can help prevent individuals from becoming a victim by observing and pointing out certain victim behaviors.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd