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FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin - April04leb

FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin - April04leb

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,441|Likes:
Features

Too Close for Comfort
By Sandra D. Terhune-Bickler
Agencies must ensure that they are prepared to handle situations involving officers in crisis.

Compstat Process
By Jon M. Shane
The first section of a three-part article on Compstat, an information-driven managerial process, examines four crime-reduction principles that form the basis of the technique.

Supreme Court Cases 2002-2003 Term
By Michael J. Bulzomi
Eight Supreme Court decisions of particular importance to law enforcement are summarized.
Features

Too Close for Comfort
By Sandra D. Terhune-Bickler
Agencies must ensure that they are prepared to handle situations involving officers in crisis.

Compstat Process
By Jon M. Shane
The first section of a three-part article on Compstat, an information-driven managerial process, examines four crime-reduction principles that form the basis of the technique.

Supreme Court Cases 2002-2003 Term
By Michael J. Bulzomi
Eight Supreme Court decisions of particular importance to law enforcement are summarized.

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Published by: FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin on Apr 21, 2010
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1
ISSN 0014-5688USPS 383-310
United StatesDepartment of JusticeFederal Bureau of InvestigationWashington, DC 20535-0001Robert S. Mueller IIIDirector
Contributors’ opinions and statementsshould not be considered anendorsement by the FBI for any policy,program, or service.The attorney general has determinedthat the publication of this periodical isnecessary in the transaction of thepublic business required by law. Useof funds for printing this periodical hasbeen approved by the director of theOffice of Management and Budget.The
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
(ISSN-0014-5688) is publishedmonthly by the Federal Bureau ofInvestigation, 935 PennsylvaniaAvenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.20535-0001. Periodicals postage paidat Washington, D.C., and additionalmailing offices. Postmaster: Sendaddress changes to Editor,
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
, FBI Academy,Madison Building, Room 201,Quantico, VA 22135.
Editor 
John E. Ott
Associate Editors 
Cynthia L. LewisDavid W. MacWhaBunny S. Morris
Art Director 
Denise Bennett Smith
Assistant Art Director 
Stephanie L. Lowe
Staff Assistant 
Linda W. SzumiloThis publication is produced bymembers of the Law EnforcementCommunication Unit,Training Division.
Internet Address
leb@fbiacademy.edu
Cover Photos
 © 
Mark C. Ide
 
Send article submissions to Editor,
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
, FBIAcademy, Madison Building, Room201, Quantico, VA 22135.
April 2004Volume 73Number 4
FeaturesDepartments
 
April 2004 / 1
hile driving home,your cell phonerings. You answerhandle, supervise, or delegatethis type of situation. Incidentsrequiring crisis negotiations of-ten are difficult, highly emo-tional, embarrassing, and dan-gerous. When the subject incrisis is a colleague, the emo-tions of everyone involved aredeeply affected. Though mostlaw enforcement agencies havespecialized crisis/hostage nego-tiation teams, members of lawenforcement may attempt toresolve the issue on their ownbecause the subject in crisisserves with their agency. Boththe officer placed in the positionof the sniper who deploys lethalforce when the barricaded sus-pect is a fellow member of theagency’s special weapons andtactical (SWAT) team and thecommander who placed the of-ficer in that sniper position facedifficult predicaments.
Research
Although limited publishedresearch is available on officersnegotiating with fellow officers,crisis negotiations involving lawenforcement personnel do occur.According to the FBI’s Hostageand Barricaded Database System(HOBAS), 22 incidents in-volving either a barricaded or
W
and hear a woman crying. Yourecognize her as the estrangedwife of your friend and fellowofficer Rob. The woman asksyou to come over because Robhas been drinking and has lockedhimself in the bathroom with hisoff-duty pistol and their 3-year-old son. She said he keeps yell-ing that he “can’t take it any-more...can’t take it anymore....”Though not a circumstanceany member of law enforcementwants to face, personnel of allranks need to prepare for how to
Too Close for Comfort 
Negotiating with Fellow Officers 
By SANDRA D. TERHUNE-BICKLER, M.S.
 © 
Mark C. Ide
 
2 / FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
suicidal officer were reported inthe United States between 1995and 2002.
1
Of these 22 reportedincidents, 3 resulted in suicides.However, law enforcement sui-cide incidents may occur morefrequently than the number actu-ally reported. Some of the mostcommon reasons given for sui-cides among law enforcementinclude relationship problems,legal trouble, psychologicalproblems, and work-relatedstress.
2
Recently, the author inter-viewed several crisis negotiatorsfrom the FBI and the police andsheriff’s departments in both LosAngeles and San Diego, Califor-nia, regarding their experienceswith officer-involved incidents.
3
These negotiators reported thatthey had experienced or knew of an incident at their agency in-volving a suicidal or barricadedofficer. Some of those inter-viewed negotiated with an in-cri-sis member of other departmentsand others negotiated with mem-bers of their own agency. One of the interviewees reported negoti-ating with a relative, althoughthe officer in crisis did not knowthe negotiator’s identity. Inter-view results have shown thatnegotiating with another policeofficer does not constitute a phe-nomenon but, rather, an issuethat agencies must confront andhandle.In an attempt to protect fel-low officers from embarrass-ment or potential disciplinary ac-tion, some members of lawenforcement try to resolve thesituation privately, even co-vertly. Law enforcement suicide,like law enforcement domesticviolence, is not a topic comfort-ably discussed.
4
For officers toadmit that they feel suicidal orhave domestic problems is closeto admitting that they have lostcontrol. In a profession that ex-pects its members to always be incontrol, law enforcement can beunforgiving or ill-prepared tohandle an officer’s admission of personal or interpersonal prob-lems. This does not mean thatofficer-involved crisis incidentscould be prevented if lawenforcement culture becamemore accepting of vulnerabilitiesamong its own personnel.Rather, it is important to ac-knowledge that these situationsdo occur and law enforcementagency personnel must remainmindful of how best to respondto that unexpected, dreadedphone call.
The Appropriate Response
When responding to an in-cident, most law enforcementpersonnel probably would saythat they act tactically, logically,and compassionately. However,would their response be the sameif the subject was a fellow of-ficer? Perhaps, the responderwould consider using the lowestlevel of intervention with a col-league, trying to engage him inconversation.
5
This may provea viable option when a low levelof intervention can resolve aparticular situation. For thisreason, agencies should have awell-respected peer support pro-gram that encourages employeesto call a coworker for mental
Officer Terhune-Bickler serves with the Santa Monica, California, Police Department,is a crisis negotiator, and coordinates the department’s peer support program.
” “ 
...agencies should have a well-respected peer support program that encourages employees to call a coworker for mental health referrals and resources.

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