Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin - Sept05leb

FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin - Sept05leb

Ratings: (0)|Views: 20|Likes:
Features
The Future of Officer Safety in an Age of Terrorism
By Michael E. Buerger and Bernard H. Levin
The potential for terrorist activity on American soil demands new conceptual understandings and practical applications of officer safety.

The Patrol Officer
By Earl M. Sweeney
Law enforcement officers constitute an effective resource in the fight against terrorism.
When Is Force Excessive?
By Thomas D. Petrowski
The U.S. Supreme Court recently revisited the issue of excessive force and provided a significant ruling.
Features
The Future of Officer Safety in an Age of Terrorism
By Michael E. Buerger and Bernard H. Levin
The potential for terrorist activity on American soil demands new conceptual understandings and practical applications of officer safety.

The Patrol Officer
By Earl M. Sweeney
Law enforcement officers constitute an effective resource in the fight against terrorism.
When Is Force Excessive?
By Thomas D. Petrowski
The U.S. Supreme Court recently revisited the issue of excessive force and provided a significant ruling.

More info:

Published by: FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin on Apr 21, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

 
2
ISSN 0014-5688USPS 383-310
United StatesDepartment of JusticeFederal Bureau of InvestigationWashington, DC 20535-0001Robert S. Mueller IIIDirector
Contributors’ opinions and statementsshould not be considered anendorsement by the FBI for any policy,program, or service.The attorney general has determinedthat the publication of this periodical isnecessary in the transaction of thepublic business required by law. Useof funds for printing this periodical hasbeen approved by the director of theOffice of Management and Budget.The
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
(ISSN-0014-5688) is publishedmonthly by the Federal Bureau ofInvestigation, 935 PennsylvaniaAvenue, N.W., Washington, D.C.20535-0001. Periodicals postage paidat Washington, D.C., and additionalmailing offices. Postmaster: Sendaddress changes to Editor,
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
, FBI Academy,Madison Building, Room 201,Quantico, VA 22135.
Editor 
John E. Ott
Associate Editors 
Cynthia L. LewisDavid W. MacWhaBunny S. Morris
Art Director 
Denise Bennett Smith
Assistant Art Director 
Stephanie L. LoweThis publication is produced bymembers of the Law EnforcementCommunication Unit, Training andDevelopment Division.
Internet Address
leb@fbiacademy.eduSend article submissions to Editor,
FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin 
,FBI Academy, Madison Building,Room 201, Quantico, VA 22135.
September 2005Volume 74Number 9
FeaturesDepartments
 
September 2005 / 1
he articles contained in this issue were pre-sented at the Future of Law Enforcementofficers to survive these daily interactions withcriminal elements, both foreign and domestic.On September 11, 2001, a group of terroristsnot only deliberately caused death and destructionat the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and in theskies above the United States but also killed 73 of this nation’s law enforcement officers. This re-sulted in more felonious deaths of officers thandied due to adversarial actionfor that entire year. This tragedycaused a reexamination of train-ing philosophies concerninglaw enforcement safety. Futuretraining programs, while incor-porating traditional safetymethods to combat criminal as-saults, also must focus on thepossibility of additional terror-ist attacks.The Future of Law Enforce-ment Safety Training in theFace of Terrorism conferenceexamined two areas of lawenforcement training: 1) issuesregarding traditional training inlaw enforcement and 2) theneed to develop new and inno-vative ways to implement law enforcement safetyissues in training curricula. The articles in thispublication reflect these views.Most law enforcement agencies have mottoson their patrol vehicles that include the phrase “ToProtect and Serve.” Officers continue to protecttheir communities from terrorists, as well as thecriminal element. But, to serve and protect theircitizens, officers also must protect themselves.
Focus on Officer Safety 
The Future of Law Enforcement Safety Training in the Face of Terrorism 
T
Safety Training in the Face of Terrorism confer-ence held at the FBI Academy on January3 through 7, 2005. Anthony J. Pinizzotto andEdward F. Davis with the Behavioral Science Unitof the FBI’s Training and Development Divisionand Charles E. Miller III with the Training andSystems Education Unit of theCriminal Justice InformationServices Division hosted 50individuals from local, state,and federal law enforcementagencies. The attendees repre-sented street-level officers,supervisors, administrators, andtrainers.One of the goals of the con-ference involved examining in-formation-gathering methodsand disseminating more data tomembers of the criminal justicesystem by the FBI’s Law En-forcement Officers Killed andAssaulted Program. Sharingtheir keen insights into currentand future requirements of thelaw enforcement community, the conference par-ticipants recognized the need to develop better,realistic, and more focused safety training. Histori-cal data gathered and published annually in the
 Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted 
report have enabled researchers to predict underwhat circumstances officers will continue to diewhile performing their official duties. A direnecessity exists to establish different ways to train
 © 
Ronald Jeffers
 
2 / FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin
raditionally, most peopleconsider officer safety interms of an individualimportance of incident-specifictactical defenses, which remaincritical parts of police training.Rather, as futurists, we profferthat the potential for terroristactivity on American soildemands new conceptualunderstandings and practicalapplications of officer safety.The elements of safety expandacross time and space, broaden-ing the threshold beyond thepotential for incident-basedcontacts. Our offerings here addto the existing canon of safetyconcerns, building upon it insome instances and supplement-ing it in others.
2
If a terrorist incident occursas a large-scale public event—an attack with conventional,chemical, biological, or nuclearweapons against symbolic ordensely populated targets—officer safety concerns change.Individual safety will be
T
officer, in extreme circum-stances, facing a “bad guy”intent upon doing harm to thatofficer. The armed encounter—and the possibility of death—puts into high relief the entirerange of tactical defenses thathave constant application:awareness of the environment,including reading “cues” fromsubjects; threat assessment; andapproach and contact tech-niques, such as handcuffing,weapons retention, and firearmshandling and use. The elementsthat officers must focus onare concentrated in time and,usually, space, with the majorityof violent encounters occurringwithin a 10- to 20-foot radius.
1
We do not intend to deni-grate or underestimate the
The Future of Officer Safety in an Age of Terrorism 
By: MICHAEL E. BUERGER, Ph.D.,and BERNARD H. LEVIN, Ed.D.
 © 
Ronald Jeffers

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd