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HEAVENLY VISIONS by J. N. Loughborough

HEAVENLY VISIONS by J. N. Loughborough

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Published by Kunedog1
HEAVENLY VISIONS
by J. N. Loughborough
Compiled By LEAH SCHMITKE 2233 Mentone Blvd. Mentone, CA 92359

MEMORIES OF ELDER J. N. LOUGHBOROUGH
BY ERNEST LLOYD THE first time I saw J. N. Loughborough he was seated on the platform of the old Tabernacle church in Battle Creek, Michigan, while Sister Ellen G. White was speaking to a large audience. This was during the General Conference of April, 1901. Elder Loughborough was one of several pioneers on the platform that morning, and I observed their kee
HEAVENLY VISIONS
by J. N. Loughborough
Compiled By LEAH SCHMITKE 2233 Mentone Blvd. Mentone, CA 92359

MEMORIES OF ELDER J. N. LOUGHBOROUGH
BY ERNEST LLOYD THE first time I saw J. N. Loughborough he was seated on the platform of the old Tabernacle church in Battle Creek, Michigan, while Sister Ellen G. White was speaking to a large audience. This was during the General Conference of April, 1901. Elder Loughborough was one of several pioneers on the platform that morning, and I observed their kee

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Published by: Kunedog1 on Apr 24, 2010
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HEAVENLY VISIONS
byJ. N. Loughborough
Compiled ByLEAH SCHMITKE2233 Mentone Blvd.Mentone, CA 92359
MEMORIES OF ELDER J. N. LOUGHBOROUGH
BY ERNEST LLOYDTHE first time I saw J. N. Loughborough he was seated on the platform of the oldTabernacle church in Battle Creek, Michigan, while Sister Ellen G. White was speakingto a large audience. This was during the General Conference of April, 1901. ElderLoughborough was one of several pioneers on the platform that morning, and I observedtheir keen interest in what Sister White was presenting to the delegates and visitors. Hewas now in (1901) past seventy and his hair was turning white. He was the smallestman on the platform.Arthur W. Spalding once wrote about Elder Loughborough: He was of a genialand sprightly nature, but most dependable. An agreeable companion, he was also athorough caretaker and an indefatigable worker. His style of writing was distinctly hisown, filled with incident and anecdotal illustrations. Beside the more solid andsometimes ponderous compositions of some of the Adventist writers, his contributionsstood out in sunny relief. Yet his offerings were serious and strong. He wrote much inexposition of prophecy, and he became the first historian of our denomination.Like other pioneers, Elder Loughborough lived simply, and was very economicalin his personal habits. I once stood behind him in an ordination service for two or threelocal church officers. As the sun shone through a large window at the rear of theplatform, I noticed that the shoulders of his black, well-worn ministerial coat had turned alittle green. Such a small matter as that, however, would not disturb his soul at all. Healways looked clean and neat even though his clothes sometimes appeared a bitancient.Elder Loughborough lived close to God, and was sometimes favored with adream in which God revealed to him His loving care for him. I remember his story of onedream he had that gave him assurance and comfort. It concerned a terrible stormthrough which his train was going one dark night. The train passed over a bridge, and just as the last car was safely across, the bridge collapsed in the rushing waters. TheElder had dreamed he was on his way to a very important meeting, and was assuredthat the heavenly Father would see him through to his destination. And so it provedwhen the event took place shortly after he had the dream.Elder Loughborough met many opponents to our doctrines through his longministry, and was well prepared to meet them, for he knew the teachings of the Word ofGod and could easily discern error. About the year 1894 he was helping two youngministers in Nebraska in a tent effort. One morning Elder Loughborough received aletter from Sister White, then in Australia, requesting him to go to Battle Creek, Michigan,1
 
as quickly as possible and confer with the Review and Herald brethren concerning abook manuscript they were preparing for publication, but which contained some errors.She believed he had met the same errors in his ministry. Within a few hours the Elderwas on an eastbound train, and in due time was in Battle Creek conferring with thebrethren regarding the matter. His help saved the institution from embarrassment andpossibly something worse.Elder Loughborough spent his last years in California. I remember his cottagehome in Mountain View, near the Pacific Press. The old cement hitching post where hetied his horse still stands by the street curb, a little monument to him. The publishingbrethren at the Pacific Press greatly appreciated Elder Loughborough's presence in theirmidst, for he was always helpful in counsel meetings. A small man physically, he was agiant in matters relating to the things of God and the work committed to His people.Very early in life Elder Loughborough decided to record in a journal his dailyactivities and items of interest concerning our denominational work and its workers.When he went to the St. Helena Sanitarium to live, about 1916, he had his daily recordbooks on a long, low bench near his table, ready for easy reference. I remember them.It was from these that he gathered many items and suggestions for his books andarticles. He was a great Bible student and made many notes. Near the close of his lifehe stated that he had read the Bible through more than seventy times. Yes, he loved theWord of God and enjoyed preaching from it.Elder Loughborough observed two birthdays, his natural birthday and his "twice-born" day. He was always happy to give his two offerings. I remember hearing him saya few words about this practice one January day at the Sabbath school in the old St.Helena Sanitarium chapel. The brethren had placed an easy chair for him just below thepulpit, where he could hear the speaker and rest comfortably. And whenever he desiredto say a few words to the congregation, they were glad to have him do so. His voicecarried well for a person of 90 years. For 75 years he was a faithful and true witness forthe Adventist faith. Both Sister White and Elder Loughborough began preaching theAdvent message at the age of seventeen, she in 1844 and he in 1849.The Petaluma church in California stands as a special monument to ElderLoughborough's work as a pioneer, for it was here that he and Elder D. T. Bourdeauorganized the first Seventh-day Adventist church on the Pacific Coast. From that smallbeginning in 1868 have come hundreds of churches and schools in the West.Elder Loughborough died in 1924 at the age of 92. He sleeps with his family inthe old cemetery in St. Helena, California. Around him are more than a score of ourministers and many faithful church members awaiting the call of the Lifegiver. What aresurrection morning that will be when the faithful will rise at the sounding of Christ'svoice and, "caught up in the air," will travel through the "open space in Orion," along thecorridor of indescribable light, to the glory land! And through that great open space inOrion will descend the New Jerusalem. (See Early Writings, p. 41.) What wondersawait the remnant! Yes, God's best things are ahead of us, preserved for the faithful!REVIEW AND HERALD, November 8, 1962.
FOREWORD
There are already many useful books in the hands of the people, and my onlyapology for adding another to that list, is the fact that in these pages is a compilation ofmany things concerning Seventh-day Adventism not generally known. Elder J. N.Loughborough, having been familiar with the Advent Movement from the very early daysin 1844 up to the time of his death in 1924 at the ripe old age of 93, has given us a2
 
wealth of information in various books, pamphlets, and periodicals in the past that arerich in valuable information. Many in the faith know little or nothing about thesemessages. In order to strengthen our faith in the Advent message, every believer oughtto review these messages over and over again, especially since we are approaching theend of time, and every one of us will be tested again on these strong points which are ofhighest importance.Elder Loughborough and other pioneers have written out some of theirexperiences - what they have SEEN, and HEARD and FELT. They were eye witness forthe providential leadings of the Lord from the very beginning of the Advent Movement.Let us read very carefully the following words from the pen of Ellen White:As witnesses for Christ, we are to tell what we KNOW, WHAT WE OURSELVESHAVE SEEN and HEARD and FELT. If we have been following Jesus step by step, weshall have something right to the point and to tell concerning the way in which He hasled us. We can tell how we have tested His promise, and found the promise true .... Thisis the witness for which our Lord calls, and for want of which the world is perishing. DA340.And this is exactly what Elder J. N. Loughborough and other pioneers have donein writing out their experiences - what they have SEEN, and HEARD and FELT.Elder Loughborough had the rare privilege to be present and witness theoperations of the gift of prophecy about 50 times in 45 years. In this volume you will finda compilation of some 50 articles that appeared in the Review and Herald from time totime, written by Elder Loughborough.Such facts as Elder Loughborough has given us should have far more weightwith the reader than random statements that may be given by those who have neverbeen present on such occasions.To my knowledge Elder Loughborough's books and periodicals are out of printtoday. I paid a high price to obtain some of his books that were printed in the early daysof the Advent Movement. Many of his periodicals in the Review and Herald arepriceless, and for this reason I have gone to the time, effort and expense to reprint someof his outstanding articles from those publications.Elder Loughborough was especially privileged to see Ellen White in vision some50 times in 45 years. These experiences are recounted in the articles in this volume.Surely these messages will bring great joy to our hearts afresh, as we are at the veryborder of the eternal world. I for one, am homesick for heaven, and these messageshave thrilled my heart - surely they bear repeating. If we ever needed these messagesto encourage us, it is now.Elder Loughborough was one of the prominent pioneers connected with thebeginning of the Advent Movement. He was ordained to the gospel ministry at the earlyage of 22 years. Closely associated with Elder and Mrs. James White in the building upof the general interests of the cause, he pioneered both in California and in Great Britain.In 1908, being then 76 years of age, he began a tour of the world in the course ofwhich he visited all our leading centers in Europe, Africa, and Australia. His presenceeverywhere imparted new life and interest in the believers, for he could speakauthoritatively concerning many aspects of the work in its beginning.Elder Loughborough was the author of many tracts, pamphlets, articles, andperiodicals, as well as of that well-known work The Great Second Advent Movement.He wrote much for our leading papers, especially the Review and Herald. He lived3

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