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MIRACLES IN MY LIFE Autobiography of Adventist Pioneer J. N. Loughborough

MIRACLES IN MY LIFE Autobiography of Adventist Pioneer J. N. Loughborough

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MIRACLES IN MY LIFE
Autobiography of Adventist Pioneer J. N. Loughborough EDITED BY ADRIEL CHILSON LEAVES-OF-AUTUMN BOOKS INCORPORATED REPRINTED JULY 1987 FOREWORD In 1852, John N. Loughborough, unimpressive in appearance and slight of build, began a determined evangelism for Seventh-day Adventists. Undaunted by blizzards and bitter cold, he traveled by buggy and sleigh over trackless prairies and baffling forest trails of the mid-west. Beginning his California labors in 1868, with a sixty-foot
MIRACLES IN MY LIFE
Autobiography of Adventist Pioneer J. N. Loughborough EDITED BY ADRIEL CHILSON LEAVES-OF-AUTUMN BOOKS INCORPORATED REPRINTED JULY 1987 FOREWORD In 1852, John N. Loughborough, unimpressive in appearance and slight of build, began a determined evangelism for Seventh-day Adventists. Undaunted by blizzards and bitter cold, he traveled by buggy and sleigh over trackless prairies and baffling forest trails of the mid-west. Beginning his California labors in 1868, with a sixty-foot

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MIRACLES IN MY LIFE
Autobiography of Adventist Pioneer J. N. LoughboroughEDITED BY ADRIEL CHILSONLEAVES-OF-AUTUMN BOOKS INCORPORATEDREPRINTEDJULY 1987FOREWORDIn 1852, John N. Loughborough, unimpressive in appearance and slight of build,began a determined evangelism for Seventh-day Adventists. Undaunted by blizzardsand bitter cold, he traveled by buggy and sleigh over trackless prairies and baffling foresttrails of the mid-west. Beginning his California labors in 1868, with a sixty-foot tent inSonoma County, he attracted overflow crowds, made many converts, but was frequentlythreatened, and narrowly escaped death form an angry, knife-wielding opponent.Few, if any, of our Adventist pioneers covered such a long span of years asLoughborough, 1832-1924. Fewer still recorded their experiences in as manypublications. Loughborough's close association with Elder and Mrs. White enables himto include many faith-building incidents in connection with the gift of prophecy, and alsoadds interest to his personal narrative. His eye-witness account is effective andauthentic.The material in this manuscript comes from books, diaries, articles and fieldreports in Adventist publications. The lengthy sermonettes have been eliminated,archaic expressions updated, but the story, the style is his own. I trust it will meet atimely need for the generation "who knew not Loughborough."A.D.C.CONTENTS1. My Early Years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12. A Time for Decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63. Teen-age Preacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114. Finding the Sabbath Truth . . . . . . . . . . . 195. "Very Bad Injun" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256. Western Itinerary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337. Our First Tent Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398. "What Doest Thou Here, Elijah?" . . . . . . 479. Organization and the Civil War . . . . . . . 5310. The Marion Rebellion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6211. Pioneering at Petaluma . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6812. A Testimony Perfectly Timed . . . . . . . . 7113. With the Whites Again . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8514. Called to England . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 971
 
15. European Dreams Come True . . . . . . . 103A FLASH AHEADMadam Parrot never dreamed that her decision to ride side-saddle to the tentmeeting would draw the attention of the entire community. Nor did she foresee her near-fatal accident and her healing so miraculous that even atheists could not deny.Among those who attended John Loughborough's evangelistic meetings at SantaRosa was a young medical graduate from Geneva known as Madam Parrot. An urgentsick call took her to the bedside of Mrs. Skinner at Piner. After a week's cot-duty, herpatient had so recovered that Dr. Parrot announced her intention to return to the tentmeetings. Mrs. Skinner's atheist son Oliver readied a horse that was used to ladies, butas she mounted, he began to buck furiously. She was thrown to the ground and thehorse upon her with such force that it bent the saddle horn out straight. As her friendslooked upon her mangled form, they felt certain she was dead. When she regainedconsciousness, she could barely whisper."Shall we send for a doctor?" someone asked her."No," she responded. "A doctor can do me no good. Send for the ministers atthe tent. If they pray for me, the Lord will heal me."Elders Loughborough and Bourdeau had just begun their evening meeting whenthe prayer request reached them. Thinking it unwise to dismiss their congregation, theypromised to come very early the next morning. When they arrived, they learned that thedoctor's condition had required four attendants throughout the night."Anoint me and pray, and the Lord will heal me," she whispered.As the ministers prayed, Dr. Parrot soon began to pray in a loud voice, thenclapped her hands and declared, "I am healed!" She arose, dressed herself, and beganto assist with the home duties. In the evening she rode to the meeting in a lumberwagon, completely free from all pain. Former atheist Oliver now enthusiasticallywitnessed of God's power to everyone he met.
01 - MY EARLY YEARS
Many have requested me to give some remembrances of early times, andmanifestations of the Lord's dealings with His people. Having been familiar with theAdvent movement of 1843-1844, and having since Jan. 2, 1849 proclaimed the doctrine,I esteem it a pleasure to "speak the things which I have seen and heard." I will first callattention to some things in my own early life.I was born in Victor, Ontario County, N.Y., Jan. 26. 1832. My father was anearnest, local Methodist preacher. When I was three years of age, a Miss Bibbinsstarted a school for little tots in one of the classrooms of the Methodist Church. On thelast day of school we were all taken into the sanctuary where our parents and otherswere assembled to hear recitations. Among the rest, I was called upon to make my firstpublic speech, which consisted of a bit of poetry I had learned. When the peopleclapped their hands, I did not know it had any reference to what I had done, sosupposed it to be their part of the meeting.In our childhood days our parents took us little folks to the "love feasts" and thecommunion seasons of the church. I well remember that as testimonies were borne inthose love feasts, they were moistened with tears and accompanied with shouts of2
 
praise that touched our young hearts. I remember, too, how plainly the people dressed,- neatly, yet without any display of jewelry.In those days, those who were to partake of communion received a ticket fromthe class leader. One woman did not get a ticket because she had worn gold. Shortlyafterward, her daughter was excluded from church for attending a ball. Poor girl! Shetook a violent cold as the result of a night of dancing, sickened and died. At her funeralthe minister expressed some doubts as to her acceptance with the Lord.1We children learned the do, re, mi, from the choir leader who always started thesinging with a tuning fork. As he placed this to his ear, he would sound the do; thenthose of the other parts of the music would sound their first note before singing.There came a time when a man stood at the head of the choir with a violin withwhich to give the leading note. Though it was a decided improvement, it displeasedsome of the members who thought that no instrumental music should be used in theLord's house. They thought the violin's only use was "with the devil's music in dancehalls."2Once when my father was constructing a certain house, there was quite a largepile of stones which they wanted moved to the other side of the fence. My uncle, whowas one of the carpenters, said if I would move them with my little wheelbarrow, I wouldfind a sixpence (twelve and one-half cents) under the last stone. Of course I workedhard to get to the last stone, and sure enough, there was the sixpence. I knew very wellthat my uncle had to divert my attention just before I picked up that last stone.The interesting thing is the use I made of that sixpence. At that time theMethodists were carrying on missionary work on the west coast of Africa. Mysympathies were aroused, and I decided that my sixpence should buy a Testament forsome poor heathen boy. There was to be a meeting at the minister's house that weekfor the people to bring clothing, money, etc. to send to Africa. The day of the missionarymeeting I was sent to the store for some article. Whether to test me or not, the merchantshowed me some things he knew I loved, and offered to sell them for a sixpence. Therewas a struggle within me whether to buy the articles or not. Then I thought of the poorheathen and left the store on a run. I hurried to the minister's house just as the peoplewere gathering, and handed him the sixpence saying, "I want to send a Testament to thepoor heathen." Then I left for home as suddenly as I had come. As I went out, I saw theminister holding up the sixpence and talking to the people. Some of them shed tears. Iimagine he made my sixpence tell for more than twelve and one-half cents. I know that Ifelt very happy afterwards.In the winter of 1837, the night after my sixth birthday, a terrific sight appeared inthe heavens and continued for the whole night. It was the fiery aurora. A man and hiswife living directly across from our home had taken my father and mother for a sleighride to spend the evening with another family two miles away. Two girls from theneighbor's family and a Miss Horton, 18 years of age, came to spend the evening with uschildren. About seven o'clock, while we were enjoying our childish sports, there came asudden flash of red light. My brother cried out, "The house is afire!" and we all rushedout-of-doors. What a sight greeted our eyes! The whole heavens had the appearanceof a red flame, mingled with cloudy vapor. The reflection of this upon the snowappeared like fire rolling in waves down from the hillside.Even Miss Horton was startled and cried out, "The world is coming to an end!"Our parents, who anticipated our terror, were soon home to calm our fright. Some of theneighbors sat up all night to watch the ever-changing grandeur. The aurora was seen allover the then settled portions of the United States.3

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