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Employer Attitudes Towards Employing Blind and Vision Impaired People - Thesis 2005

Employer Attitudes Towards Employing Blind and Vision Impaired People - Thesis 2005

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Published by winniewoo1
Previous international research has shown blind and vision-impaired people to be in the less favoured groups of employees employers are willing to hire. None of the research has addressed why this is the case.
The present study was undertaken firstly to see if in New Zealand also, blind and vision-impaired people were less favoured in comparison with other disability groups as potential employees; and secondly, to determine employer attitudes and perceptions towards employing blind people, and how or why these attitudes and perceptions influence employers to overlook the blind and vision-impaired when employing staff.
One hundred and two employers (sample 200) participated in a telephone survey and, of those, six were interviewed again in an in-depth face-to-face interview. A combination of attitudinal and perception survey instruments were used.
Previous international research has shown blind and vision-impaired people to be in the less favoured groups of employees employers are willing to hire. None of the research has addressed why this is the case.
The present study was undertaken firstly to see if in New Zealand also, blind and vision-impaired people were less favoured in comparison with other disability groups as potential employees; and secondly, to determine employer attitudes and perceptions towards employing blind people, and how or why these attitudes and perceptions influence employers to overlook the blind and vision-impaired when employing staff.
One hundred and two employers (sample 200) participated in a telephone survey and, of those, six were interviewed again in an in-depth face-to-face interview. A combination of attitudinal and perception survey instruments were used.

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Published by: winniewoo1 on Apr 25, 2010
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02/23/2013

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BLIND PEOPLE CAN DO ANYTHINGBUTNOT IN MY COMPANYEMPLOYER ATTITUDES TOWARDSEMPLOYING BLIND AND VISION-IMPAIRED PEOPLEA thesis submitted in partial fulfilmentof the requirements for the degree of Master of Business StudiesAt Massey University, Albany, NewZealandbyChristine Inglis2006Approved by _________________________________________________ Chairman of Supervisory CommitteeReviewer_________________________________________ Reviewer_________________________________________ Reviewer_________________________________________ Programme Authorisedto Offer Degree_______________________________________________ 
 
Date _________________________________________________________ 
 
ABSTRACTPrevious international research has shown blind and vision-impairedpeople to be in the less favoured groups of employees employersare willing to hire. None of the research has addressed why this isthe case. The present study was undertaken firstly to see if in New Zealandalso, blind and vision-impaired people were less favoured incomparison with other disability groups as potential employees; andsecondly, to determine employer attitudes and perceptions towardsemploying blind people, and how or why these attitudes andperceptions influence employers to overlook the blind and vision-impaired when employing staff.One hundred and two employers (sample 200) participated in atelephone survey and, of those, six were interviewed again in an in-depth face-to-face interview. A combination of attitudinal andperception survey instruments were used. The research found participants had mainly favourable attitudestowards blind and vision-impaired people. However, in totalcontrast, blind and vision-impaired people (alongside those withmoderate to severe intellectual disabilities) were regarded the leastsuitable or least employable for positions most and second mostoften available in firms across all industries. The results were congruent with earlier findings (Gilbride, Stensrud,Ehlers, Evans & Peterson, 2000) in that of all of the disability groups,blindness and persons with moderate or severe (mental retardation)intellectual handicap were perceived as the hardest to employ incomparison with other disability groups.

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