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Homeless

Homeless

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Published by n3f32010
Homelessness can affect every ethnicity, every age and gender, and at any stage in a person’s career. Many people, especially in today’s economy, are just a few paychecks away from becoming homeless. Natural disasters and large unexpected expenses can leave people instantly homeless with limited resources for rebuilding their homes or their lives. This course helps you teach basic money management skills—distinguishing needs from wants, controlling spending, creating a spending plan, finding a better job—that can lead to a more secure future and put an end to homelessness.
Homelessness can affect every ethnicity, every age and gender, and at any stage in a person’s career. Many people, especially in today’s economy, are just a few paychecks away from becoming homeless. Natural disasters and large unexpected expenses can leave people instantly homeless with limited resources for rebuilding their homes or their lives. This course helps you teach basic money management skills—distinguishing needs from wants, controlling spending, creating a spending plan, finding a better job—that can lead to a more secure future and put an end to homelessness.

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Published by: n3f32010 on Apr 26, 2010
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05/03/2013

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Project Independence - Homeless Money Management 1
Money Management: Making the Transition to Independence
Target Audience: Homeless
 Audience Profile
Tracking homelessness is no easy task. In fact it can be misleading to simply ask: howmany people are homeless? Homelessness is often a temporary circumstance, not apermanent condition. In today’s economic situation, more people are in danger of losingtheir homes than ever before.Homelessness hits every ethnicity, every age and gender, and it can hit at varyingstages in a person’s financial status and career. Many people are actually just a fewpaychecks short of becoming homeless.Research by the National Coalition for the Homeless indicates “two trends are largelyresponsible for the rise in homelessness over the past 20-25 years: a growing shortageof affordable rental housing and a simultaneous increase in poverty. Persons living inpoverty are most at risk of becoming homeless, and demographic groups who are morelikely to experience poverty are also more likely to experience homelessness.”Homelessness can occur because an individual doesn’t have family, friends or a socialnetwork on which to rely. Low-income jobs may be a contributing factor tohomelessness. A lack of savings and low cash flow is a dangerous combination,especially when unexpected expenses such as medical bills or car repairs occur.Lack of health insurance may force some into debt and poverty. Natural disasters canleave people instantly homeless, with limited resources for rebuilding. Drug and alcoholaddiction may be another contributing factor to homelessness. Individuals with anaddiction may choose to spend their money fueling their addiction instead of spendingtheir money on food, rent, and bills. Mental illness, when not treated appropriately andconsistently, can also impact an individual’s ability to obtain and maintain stable housing.Clearly, people who become homeless do not fit one general description. However,people experiencing homelessness do have certain shared basic needs, includingaffordable housing, adequate incomes, and health care. Some homeless people mayneed additional services such as mental health or drug treatment in order to remainsecurely housed. All of these needs must be met to prevent and to end homelessness.
Program Overview 
Most people are interested in learning how to manage money. However, many peoplemay be embarrassed to admit that they don’t know the first thing about moneymanagement. It’s important to recognize that many homeless people may be livingpaycheck-to-paycheck or are dealing on a cash basis only. The key to this short programis to encourage participants to carefully manage what money they have regardless of theamount. This 60-minute program is designed to provide participants with a few of thebasics of money management: identifying needs and wants, controlling spending,creating a savings habit, and tracking expenses.
 
Project Independence - Homeless Money Management 2
Facilitator’s Preparation:
Review this guide and complete your own set of the accompanyingworksheets.
Review the suggested length for each topic noted as (10) or (15) and so on.This session is designed to be 60 minutes (1 hour) from
Welcome
to
Wrap
.
Consider your own money management skills: Do you consistently chooseneeds over wants? Do you track your expenses? Do you pay yourself first?It’s important to know your own strengths and challenges!
Remember how you felt before you learned the ins and outs of moneymanagement, and how you learned to manage your money.
Consider that when it comes to talking about money, sharing your ownsuccesses and challenges may be more engaging and effective thanappearing to be lecturing.
Materials Needed 
:
Flip chart and easel or marker board; markers
Pencils for participants
Copies of 
What’s My Money Attitude? 
worksheet
Copies of 
Needs vs. Wants
worksheet
Copies of 
Spending Diary 
worksheet
Copies of 
Personal Spending Plan
worksheet
 
Copies of 
My Action Plan
worksheet
 
How to Facilitate this Session
Welcome
(5) Introduce yourself and express your pleasure in sharing some basic tipsfor managing money.
Have each participant introduce him/herself and share one concept/ideathat he/she wants to take away from this session. List the take-aways onthe flip chart or marker board.
Share the program objectives and tie them back to the list of take-aways.
Recognize our money attitudes
Consider needs and wants, and choices that must be made
Understand our spending habits
Commit to an action plan
Money Attitudes
(10) Explain to participants that before they can consider tackling moneymanagement skills, it’s helpful to understand their own attitude aboutmoney.
 ?Ask
participants to define
 personal values
. [For the most part,personal values are those things that are most important to you, thosethings that must be true for you to lead a happy and fulfilled life. Your values are also those things that really motivate you.]
 
Project Independence - Homeless Money Management 3
Distribute
What’s My Money Attitude? 
worksheets.
Review the directions. Emphasize participants should go with their firstthoughts and that there are no right or wrong answers. Allow 6-7 minutesfor participants to complete their worksheets.
When time is up, ask for volunteers to complete the sentences as youread each
one
.
 
Remind participants that there are no right or wrong answers. Suggestthat managing money depends on knowing how you view money andwhat you value in life.
 
Needs and Wants
(15) Stress to participants that we all have a limited amount of money,regardless of the amounts. We all have to make decisions about what weshould buy now, what we should wait to buy, and what we can actually dowithout.
?Ask
participants to explain the difference between needs and wants.[
Needs
are things that are essential for us to have such as food andshelter and
wants
can be thought of as “extras.”]
Distribute the
Needs vs. Wants
worksheets.
Review the directions. Have participants complete Step 1. Allow 5-6minutes for participants to list their needs and wants.
Review steps 2-4. Answer any questions. Have participants completeSteps 2-4. Allow 6-7 minutes for participants to complete the process.
?Ask
participants if anyone was surprised by what they might be able todo without after taking a closer look.
Remind participants that managing money means making choices. Thereis never enough money for all of the things we want. Sometimes, there isnot enough money for the things we need, unless we’ve planned for anemergency.
Spending Habits
(10)
 
4.
 
Suggest that creating a savings habit is challenging but not impossible.The first step to establishing a savings habit is examining your spendinghabits.
?Ask
participants to identify themselves as either 
spenders
or 
savers
byraising their hands when you ask the question, “How many of who aresavers? How many of you are spenders?”
Suggest that most people are a little of both, depending on their moods.The good news is that we can develop smart money management skills

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