Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Classical Geometry - Danny Calegari

Classical Geometry - Danny Calegari

Ratings: (0)|Views: 49|Likes:
Published by de_jack
Classical Geometry - Danny Calegari
Classical Geometry - Danny Calegari

More info:

Published by: de_jack on May 01, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/10/2013

pdf

text

original

 
CLASSICAL GEOMETRY — LECTURE NOTES
DANNY CALEGARI
1. A
CRASH COURSE IN GROUP THEORY
A
group
is an algebraic object which formalizes the mathematical notion which ex-presses the intuitive idea of 
symmetry
. We start with an abstract definition.
Definition 1.1.
A
group
is a set
G
and an operation
m
:
G
×
G
G
called
multiplication
with the following properties:(1)
m
is
associative
. That is, for any
a,b,c
G
,
m
(
a,m
(
b,c
)) =
m
(
m
(
a,b
)
,c
)
and the product can be written unambiguously as
abc
.(2) There is a unique element
e
G
called
the identity
with the properties that, forany
a
G
,
ae
=
ea
=
a
(3) For any
a
G
there is a unique element in
G
denoted
a
1
called
the inverse
of 
a
such that
aa
1
=
a
1
a
=
e
Given an object with some structural qualities, we can study the symmetries of thatobject; namely, the set of transformations of the object to itself which preserve the structurein question. Obviously, symmetries can be composed associatively, since the effect of asymmetry on the object doesn’t depend on what sequence of symmetries we applied to theobject in the past. Moreover, the transformation which does nothing preserves the structureof the object. Finally, symmetries are reversible — performing the opposite of a symmetryis itself a symmetry. Thus, the symmetries of an object (also called the
automorphisms
of an object) are an example of a group.The power of the abstract idea of a group is that the symmetries can be studied bythemselves, without requiring them to be tied to the object they are transforming. So forinstance, the same group can act by symmetries of many different objects, or on the sameobject in many different ways.
 Example
1.2
.
The group with only one element
e
and multiplication
e
×
e
=
e
is calledthe
trivial group
.
 Example
1.3
.
The integers
Z
with
m
(
a,b
) =
a
+
b
is a group, with identity
0
.
 Example
1.4
.
The positive real numbers
R
+
with m
(
a,b
) =
ab
is a group, with identity
1
.
 Example
1.5
.
The group with two elements
even
and
odd
and “multiplication” given bythe usual rules of addition of even and odd numbers; here
even
is the identity element.This group is denoted
Z
/
2
Z
.
 Example
1.6
.
The group of integers mod
n
is a group with
m
(
a,b
) =
a
+
b
mod
n
andidentity
0
. This group is denoted
Z
/n
Z
and also by
n
, the
cyclic group of length
n
.
1
 
2 DANNY CALEGARI
Definition1.7.
If 
G
and
aregroups, onecanformthe
Cartesianproduct 
, denoted
G
.Thisisagroupwhoseelementsaretheelementsof 
G
×
where
m
: (
G
×
)
×
(
G
×
)
G
×
is defined by
m
((
g
1
,h
1
)
,
(
g
2
,h
2
)) = (
m
G
(
g
1
,g
2
)
,m
(
h
1
,h
2
))
The identity element is
(
e
G
,e
)
.
 Example
1.8
.
Let
be a regular tetrahedron; label opposite pairs of edges by
A,B,C 
.Then the group of symmetries which preserves the labels is
Z
/
2
Z
Z
/
2
Z
. It is alsoknown as the
Klein
4
 –group
.In all of the examples above,
m
(
a,b
) =
m
(
b,a
)
. A group with this property is called
commutative
or
Abelian
. Not all groups are Abelian!
 Example
1.9
.
Let
be an equilateral triangle with sides
A,B,C 
opposite vertices
a,b,c
in anticlockwise order. The symmetries of 
are the reflections in the lines running fromthe corners to the midpoints of opposite sides, and the rotations. There are three possiblerotations, through anticlockwise angles
0
,
2
π/
3
,
4
π/
3
which can be thought of as
e,ω,ω
2
.Observe that
ω
1
=
ω
2
. Let
r
a
be a reflection through the line from the vertex
a
tothe midpoint of 
A
. Then
r
a
=
r
1
a
and similarly for
r
b
,r
c
. Then
ω
1
r
a
ω
=
r
c
but
r
a
ω
1
ω
=
r
a
so this group is
not commutative
. It is callec the
dihedral group
D
3
and has
6
elements.
 Example
1.10
.
If 
is an equilateral
n
–gon, the symmetries are reflections as above androtations. This is called the
dihedral group
D
n
and has
2
n
elements. The elements are
e,ω,ω
2
,...,ω
n
1
=
ω
1
and
r
1
,r
2
,...,r
n
where
r
2
i
=
e
for all
i
,
r
i
r
j
=
ω
2(
i
j
)
and
ω
1
r
i
ω
=
r
i
1
.
 Example
1.11
.
Thesymmetriesofan“equilateral
–gon”(i.e. theuniqueinfinite
2
–valenttree) defines a group
D
, the
infinite dihedral group
.
 Example
1.12
.
The set of 
2
×
2
matrices whose entries are real numbers and whose de-terminants do not vanish is a group, where multiplication is the usual multiplication of matrices. The set of 
all
2
×
2
matrices is
not 
naturally a group, since some matrices are notinvertible.
 Example
1.13
.
The group of permutations of the set
{
1
...n
}
is called the
symmetric group
S
n
. A permutation breaks the set up into subsets on which it acts by cycling the members.For example,
(3
,
2
,
4)(5
,
1)
denotes the element of 
S
5
which takes
1
5
,
2
4
,
3
2
,
4
3
,
5
1
. The group
S
n
has
n
!
elements. A
transposition
is a permutation whichinterchanges exactly two elements. A permutation is
even
if it can be written as a productof an even number of transpositions, and
odd 
otherwise.
Exercise 1.14.
Show that the symmetric group is not commutative for 
n >
2
. Identify
S
3
and 
S
4
as groups of rigid motions of familiar objects. Show that an even permutation isnot an odd permutation, and vice versa.
Definition 1.15.
A
subgroup
of 
G
is a subset such that if 
h
then
h
1
, andif 
h
1
,h
2
then
h
1
h
2
. With its inherited multiplication operation from
G
,
isa group. The
right cosets
of 
in
G
are the equivalence classes
[
g
]
of elements
g
G
where the equivalence relation is given by
g
1
g
2
if and only if there is an
h
with
g
1
=
g
2
h
.
Exercise 1.16.
If 
is finite, the number of elements of 
G
in each equivalence class areequal to
|
|
 , the number of elements in
. Consequently, if 
|
G
|
is finite,
|
|
divides
|
G
|
.
 
CLASSICAL GEOMETRY LECTURE NOTES 3
Exercise 1.17.
Show that the subset of even permutations is a subgroup of the symmetricgroup, known as the
alternating group
and denoted 
A
n
. Identify
A
5
as a group of rigid motions of a familiar object. Example
1.18
.
Given a collection of elements
{
g
i
}
G
(not necessarily finite or evencountable), the
subgroup generated by the
g
i
is the subgroup whose elements are obtainedby multiplying together
finitely
many of the
g
i
and their inverses in some order.
Exercise 1.19.
Why are only finite multiplications allowed in defining subgroups? Showthat a group in which infinite multiplication makes sense is a trivial group. This fact is not as useless as it might seem . . .
Definition 1.20.
A group is
cyclic
if it is generated by a single element. This justifies thenotation
n
for
Z
/n
Z
used before.
Definition 1.21.
A
homomorphism
between groups is a map
:
G
1
G
2
such that
(
g
1
)
(
g
2
) =
(
g
1
g
2
)
for any
g
1
,g
2
in
G
1
. The
kernel
of a homomorphism is the sub-group
G
1
defined by
=
1
(
e
)
. If 
=
e
then we say
is
injective
. If everyelement of 
G
2
is in the image of 
, we say it is
surjective
. A homomorphism which isinjective and surjective is called an
isomorphism
.
 Example
1.22
.
Every finite group
G
is isomorphic to a subgroup of 
S
n
where
n
is thenumber of elements in
G
. For, let
b
:
G
{
1
,...,n
}
be a bijection, and identify anelement
g
with the permutation which takes
b
(
h
)
b
(
gh
)
for all
h
.
Definition 1.23.
An
exact sequence
of groups is a (possibly terminating in either direction)sequence
···
G
i
G
i
+1
G
i
+2
...
 joined by a sequence of homomorphisms
h
i
:
G
i
G
i
+1
such that the
image
of 
h
i
isequal to the
kernel
of 
h
i
+1
for each
i
.
Definition 1.24.
If 
a,b
G
, then
bab
1
is called
the conjugate
of 
a
by
b
, and
aba
1
b
1
is called
the commutator 
of 
a
and
b
. Abelian groups are characterized by the property thata conjugate of 
a
is equal to
a
and every commutator is trivial.
Definition 1.25.
A subgroup
G
is
normal
, denoted
G
if for any
n
and
g
G
we have
gng
1
. A kernel of a homomorphism is normal. Conversely, if 
is normal, we can define the
quotient group
G/N 
whose elements are equivalence classes
[
g
]
of elements in
G
, and two elements
g,h
are equivalent iff 
g
=
hn
for some
n
.The multiplication is given by
m
([
g
]
,
[
h
]) = [
gh
]
and the fact that
is normal says this iswell–defined. Thus normal subgroups are exactly kernels of homomorphisms.
 Example
1.26
.
Any subgroup of an abelian group is normal.
 Example
1.27
.
Z
is a normal subgroup of 
R
. The quotient group
R
/
Z
is also called
thecircle group
1
. Can you see why?
 Example
1.28
.
Let
D
n
be the dihedral group, and let
n
be the subgroup generated by
ω
.Then
n
is normal, and
D
n
/C 
n
=
Z
/
2
Z
.
Definition 1.29.
If 
G
is a group, the subgroup
G
1
generated by the commutators in
G
iscalled the
commutator subgroup
of 
G
. Let
G
2
be the subgroup generated by commutatorsof elements of 
G
with elements of 
G
1
. We denote
G
1
= [
G,G
]
and
G
2
= [
G,G
1
]
. Define
G
i
inductively by
G
i
= [
G,G
i
1
]
. The elements of 
G
i
are the elements which can bewritten as products of iterated commutators of length
i
. If 
G
i
is trivial for some
i
— that

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->