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No Time to Waste: Turning Your Resume into Junk Mail Squanders Employers Time and Your Own

No Time to Waste: Turning Your Resume into Junk Mail Squanders Employers Time and Your Own

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Published by Dave Saunders
I have to say that this may be one of the most ridiculous e-mails I have ever received – which is pretty sad when you consider that this was an actual attempt by a prospective candidate to obtain a job. There were a lot of assumptions on her part – that I would delve into her attachment to discover her fabulousness, that I had nothing better to do than remember her resume should a position become available, and that I could figure out what type of position she was wanted simply by reading her resume.
I have to say that this may be one of the most ridiculous e-mails I have ever received – which is pretty sad when you consider that this was an actual attempt by a prospective candidate to obtain a job. There were a lot of assumptions on her part – that I would delve into her attachment to discover her fabulousness, that I had nothing better to do than remember her resume should a position become available, and that I could figure out what type of position she was wanted simply by reading her resume.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Dave Saunders on May 27, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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06/16/2009

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No Time to Waste:Turning Your Resumeinto Junk Mail Squanders EmployersTime and Your Own
“I am interested in a position with your company. My resume is attached should something become available, at which time I ask you to contact mefor an interview.” 
I have to say that this may be one of the most ridiculous e-mails I have everreceived – which is pretty sad when you consider that this was an actualattempt by a prospective candidate to obtain a job. There were a lot of assumptions on her part – that I would delve into her attachment to discoverher fabulousness, that I had nothing better to do than remember her resumeshould a position become available, and that I could figure out what type of position she was wanted simply by reading her resume. The e-mail, frankly, made me feel like this candidate needed a babysitter,not a job. Job seekers need to focus their employment searches to ensure that theyare applying for positions they can actually get. That doesn’t mean that you
 
can’t try to apply for jobs that would mean advancement in your industry or anew career in a new field. Unless you’re getting unsolicited calls from peoplewanting to hire you, however,
 you
need to be the instrument of such careerswitches.In today’s fast-paced work environment, you can’t expect an employer tofile your resume away for retrieval at a later date. Smart job seekers haveposted their resumes online in such traditional job boards as Monster.comand Hotjobs.com, and really savvy professionals keep their professionalinformation current via such sites as LinkedIn.com and VisualCV.com, whichoffer an opportunity for professional networking. Networking, not random junk e-mails, can spark an employer’s memory when it comes to searchingout candidates.If you do really want to search for a job outside your current job description,you need to really work the system. Start a dialogue with people who areworking in your desired field via blogs, message boards, and networkingsites. Always keep your professional information current and available –whether it’s on your homepage or an online resume service. Ask for advicefrom people who are doing the jobs you want to do, or who hire the peoplewho are doing the jobs you want. It never hurts to have friends in high places.While it’s always easier to get a job that you’ve done before, you can applyfor other kinds of positions. Remember, though, that especially if you have noexperience, it’s very, very unlikely that an employer will remember yourresume or create a place for you on their team. Watch the job boards and thecareer page on the company’s Web site for a position that you want (within

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