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AED205 / AED 205 / Engaging Disengaged Students

AED205 / AED 205 / Engaging Disengaged Students

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Published by Number1Tutor
Select the scenario below that is aligned with the age group you are interested in working with.



· Identify strengths in the lesson or the teacher’s behavior that make the lesson engaging.



· Address students who are not engaged in the lesson. How would you approach the disengaged students, and what would you do to get them interested in completing and learning from the lesson? Use strategies for motivating disengaged students discussed in Ch. 7.







o Elementary School:







Mrs. Nelson is teaching a vocabulary lesson. Standing at the front of the classroom, she reads a short story to the class. The story is about how a brother and sister that got lost in the woods and survived on their own for 2 days until they were found by their dog. All but two students, Stephanie and Oscar, are listening with wide eyes and open mouths. After reading the story, Mrs. Nelson lists some of the words from the story on the board and asks the students to look up the words in the dictionary, write the definition of each word, use each word in a sentence, then draw a picture to illustrate the sentence. Their sentences can either come from their own imagination or from their memory of the story. After giving the directions, Mrs. Nelson circulates the room. Almost all of the students eagerly begin the activity, but Stephanie is looking out the window and Oscar is doodling on his paper.







o Middle or High School:







Mr. Nelson is teaching an American History lesson about the Great Depression. Standing at the front of the classroom, he reads a newspaper article written the day after Black Tuesday. He then reads two more short articles about the aftermath. He asks students to close their eyes and think about the last time they were very hungry or very worried. A few moments later, he has the students open their eyes. He delivers a 10-minute PowerPoint® presentation about what life was like in the lower, middle, and upper classes during the Great Depression, complete with pictures and clips of popular music from the era. After the presentation, Mr. Nelson walks the class to the library to work on research for a small team assignment. Students are told to work in pairs to write a newspaper article about a day in the life of an American, as if they were reporters during the Great Depression. One student puts his head down and falls asleep. Another student works on sending text messages instead of helping his partner work on the project.





Post your response as an attachment
Select the scenario below that is aligned with the age group you are interested in working with.



· Identify strengths in the lesson or the teacher’s behavior that make the lesson engaging.



· Address students who are not engaged in the lesson. How would you approach the disengaged students, and what would you do to get them interested in completing and learning from the lesson? Use strategies for motivating disengaged students discussed in Ch. 7.







o Elementary School:







Mrs. Nelson is teaching a vocabulary lesson. Standing at the front of the classroom, she reads a short story to the class. The story is about how a brother and sister that got lost in the woods and survived on their own for 2 days until they were found by their dog. All but two students, Stephanie and Oscar, are listening with wide eyes and open mouths. After reading the story, Mrs. Nelson lists some of the words from the story on the board and asks the students to look up the words in the dictionary, write the definition of each word, use each word in a sentence, then draw a picture to illustrate the sentence. Their sentences can either come from their own imagination or from their memory of the story. After giving the directions, Mrs. Nelson circulates the room. Almost all of the students eagerly begin the activity, but Stephanie is looking out the window and Oscar is doodling on his paper.







o Middle or High School:







Mr. Nelson is teaching an American History lesson about the Great Depression. Standing at the front of the classroom, he reads a newspaper article written the day after Black Tuesday. He then reads two more short articles about the aftermath. He asks students to close their eyes and think about the last time they were very hungry or very worried. A few moments later, he has the students open their eyes. He delivers a 10-minute PowerPoint® presentation about what life was like in the lower, middle, and upper classes during the Great Depression, complete with pictures and clips of popular music from the era. After the presentation, Mr. Nelson walks the class to the library to work on research for a small team assignment. Students are told to work in pairs to write a newspaper article about a day in the life of an American, as if they were reporters during the Great Depression. One student puts his head down and falls asleep. Another student works on sending text messages instead of helping his partner work on the project.





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Published by: Number1Tutor on May 11, 2010
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01/09/2013

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