Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Social Studies Essay-Partnership

Social Studies Essay-Partnership

Ratings: (0)|Views: 299|Likes:
Published by Minchul Park
For Year 10 Macleans College Students.
Partnership topic essay-Explain the key events which led to the signing of the Treaty. Analyse the different perspectives of European / British government / settlers and the Maori at the time the Treaty was signed.
For Year 10 Macleans College Students.
Partnership topic essay-Explain the key events which led to the signing of the Treaty. Analyse the different perspectives of European / British government / settlers and the Maori at the time the Treaty was signed.

More info:

Published by: Minchul Park on May 12, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOCX, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/28/2013

pdf

text

original

 
“Trick or Treaty?” Explain the key events which led to the signing of the Treaty. Analyse the different perspectives of European / British government /settlers and the Maori at the time the Treaty was signed.
In the history of New Zealand, one of the most famous incidents that ever happenedin New Zealand was the Treaty of Waitangi. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 6February 1840. However, most New Zealanders do not know the event in depth,although they are living in New Zealand. It is understood in general, when looking ata treaty of some sort, one must understand the events that took place before the Treaty, the background and different perspectives of the people who signed the Treaty of Waitangi. It is very interesting to know that the European version and theMaori version of the Treaty were very much different in meaning.In total, eight main key events took place before the Treaty. Firstly, in 1814, theReverendSamuel Marsden of the Church Missionary Society preached the firstsermon in New Zealand, on Christmas Day 1814. In 1831, growing lawlessnessamong Europeans in New Zealand and fears of a French annexation of the countryled 13 northern chiefs to ask King William IV for his protection. In 1833, to protectMaori, the growing number of British settlers and its own trade interest, the Britishgovernment appointed James Busby as its official British Resident – a type of juniorconsular representative with little power. In 1835, British Resident James Busbydrew up the Declaration of Independence of New Zealand. It contained theindependence of New Zealand, with all power and authority resting with the chiefsand tribes. 52 Maori chiefs signed the declaration in 1835. In December 1837, theBritish government decided that it had to interfere in New Zealand to ensure thatcolonisation was regulated and that land transactions that defrauded Maori werestopped. The first of the New Zealand Company ships, the Tory, set sail for NewZealand in May 1839. In 1839, the British government appointed William Hobson asconsul to New Zealand in 1839. Hobson was instructed to obtain sovereignty overall or part of New Zealand with the consent of a sufficient number of chiefs. Lastly,in 30 January 1840, Governor Gipps prohibited further private land purchases fromMaori, and no existing claims were to be recognised until the authorities hadinvestigated them. The European / British government / settlers’ perspectives of the Treaty werecompletely different from the perspectives of the Maoris. Through the Pakeha eyes,the Treaty sets up a legal relationship between the British Crown and Maori chiefs.Unfortunately, for the Maoris the Treaty of Waitangi was just a piece of paper withsome signatures on it. Through the British government’s perspective, the Treatymeant that the Crown would rule all New Zealand including the Pakeha and Maori.In addition, British law would be applied to everyone, which indicates all Europeansand Maori. Moreover, the Treaty of Waitangi meant British could now bring theirown culture, such as language and ways of doing things into New Zealand. The Treaty of Waitangi meant that the Europeans would now be able to buy land

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Smiles liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->