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Theory Critique of the Bondage Breaker

Theory Critique of the Bondage Breaker

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Published by patrickaking
This is a critique of the book, The Bondage Breaker, by Neil Anderson
This is a critique of the book, The Bondage Breaker, by Neil Anderson

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Published by: patrickaking on May 13, 2010
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08/01/2013

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TC 5 1Running head: BONDAGE BREAKERA Critique of a Theoretical Counseling Model
The Bondage Breaker 
by Neil T. AndersonPatrick KingLiberty UniversityCoun507_ B04_ 201020 SpringSub-term BDeadline: 2/28/10
Instructor‟s Name – 
Dr. James Eisenhower
 
Date of Submission 2/28/10
 
TC 5 2A Critique of a Theoretical Counseling Model
The Bondage Breaker 
by Neil T. AndersonIn his book,
The Bondage Breaker,
Neil T. Anderson, present a theoretical model forovercoming negative thoughts, irrational feelings, and habitual sins. This examination of 
Anderson‟s model summarizes both the theoretical and theological orientation of his approach,
considers the approach in the context of Dr. Hawkins concentric circle theory of personality, andpresents a critique with regard to some of the perceived strengths and weaknesses of hisapproach.
Overview of theoretical orientation and process
 In Romans chapter 7 the apostle Paul addresses one of the most frustrating dilemmas of 
the Christian life, a problem he called “the law of sin” (Romans 7:23).
In his brief explanation of 
the law he declared, “when I want to do good, evil is right there with me… waging war… andmaking me a prisoner” (Romans 7:21,23). It is exactly this maddening quandary that Anderson
addresses in
The Bondage Breaker.
 In a break from the traditional psychological and biological explanations of dysfunctionalbehavior, Anderson (1993) suggests the spiritual world as an alternate etiology of dysfunction,
 particularly in the case of Christians, with what he calls, “bondage to various forms of Satanismand the occult” (Anderson, 1993, p. 11).
Anderson (1993) asserts that there are two conceptsintegral to the successful Christian life, maturity and freedom (Anderson, 1993, p. 11). Bothconcepts are well supported in scripture and in theological terms are referred to as sanctification(maturity) and justification (freedom). He infers from scripture that Satan is vehemently
“opposed to our maturity and will do anything he can to keep us from realizing who we are andwhat we have in Christ” (Anderson, 1993, p. 11).
 Laying a theological foundation for his approach to healing, Anderson (1993) explainsthat maturity in Christ is a life-long process, but freedom from sin and its power occurs
 
TC 5 3instantaneously and is completed at the moment of salvation. He suggests that in spite of the factthat Satan has no authority or right of ownership in the life of those whom the Lord hasredeemed, it is his intention to keep followers of Christ completely deceived and therefore
“subject to sin, prone to failure, and controlled by habits”
(Anderson, 1993, p. 12). AlthoughAnderson (1993) does not completely dismiss a more traditional and widely acceptedexplanation with regard to the etiology of dysfunctional behavior, he is primarily concerned withthe
influence of “the kingdom of darkness”
(Anderson, 1993, p. 29) in addressing unrelentingp
hysical and psychological symptoms. Anderson says, “I‟m not saying that everyone who is illor in pain is being terrorized by a demon… But I am convinced that many Christians battle
physical symptoms unsuccessfully through natural means when the essence of the problem and
the solution is spiritual” (Anderson, 1993, pp. 31
-32).
From Anderson‟s (1993) perspective dysfunctional behavior follows a logical
progression beginning with the mere consideration of an act that in some way violates theholiness of God. Temptation ultimately yields to a conscious decision to act out the immoralbehavior, which when frequently repeated forms a habit. Eventually control over any givenbehavior is relinquished when habits are exercised long enough to provide Satan with anopportunity to establish that which Anderson (1993) refers to as a stronghold.
He suggests, “if we remain under [Satan‟s] influence long enough, we can lose control” (Anderson, 1993, p. 99).
 Additionally, Anderson postulates that some strongholds are
“anchored in demonic influences
and spiritual conflicts from past and present mental assaults which lock their
victims in bondage”
(Anderson, 1993, p. 54).Anderson (1993) suggests that loss of control is a gradual process, happening over anextended period of time, and leading to three progressively severe levels of bondage. At the firstlevel of bondage daily functioning is impaired by self-deprecating thoughts and feelings of guilt.The second level is characterized by the
 presence of “strange „evil‟ voices which seem tooverpower” (Anderson, 1993, p. 107) one‟s own thoughts. The final level of bondage is

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