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The Cleaner Plate Club — Book Layout and Design (sample pages)

The Cleaner Plate Club — Book Layout and Design (sample pages)

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Published by Storey Publishing
Childhood obesity. Diabetes. Developmental delays and disorders. Today’s parents know that what their kids eat is key to their health. Their kids are bombarded with a relentless parade of ads for junk food, fast food, and empty calorie “treats.” How can parents get their kids to eat meals that don’t come out of a box?

The Cleaner Plate Club comes to the rescue. Mommy-bloggers Beth Bader and Alison Benjamin offer simple solutions, recipes, meal suggestions, and tips to help parents get kids to eat nonprocessed food that’s been grown locally or organically and — guess what? — enjoy it. They recognize that cooking real food isn’t difficult, but it does require some know-how, which they supply with humor and compassion. Beth and Alison show readers how to prepare foods found at the farmers’ market (and how to substitute, say, asparagus for string beans if need be), plan ahead and estimate prep time, and get used to cooking food that doesn’t come with printed directions. Their fresh advice will help parents eliminate food waste, plan for leftovers, present foods that are appealing to kids, and quit fighting with their children — finally — about food.

The Cleaner Plate Club offers kid-tested recipes for every meal, basic vegetable preparations for farmers’ market finds, and more healthful recipes for sweets and snacks. Readers will also find shopping strategies, the reasons kids like the foods they do, and vegetable profiles (including nutrition information and tips on selection, storage, and preparation). Expert advice and innovative ideas about feeding kids make this book a must-have for any parent. Fresh, funny, and nonjudgmental, The Cleaner Plate Club is a recipe for healthier kids and happier parents.

The Authors:
Beth Bader is a mom determined to make the world a better place for her child, one meal at a time. She writes about her family’s food adventures on her popular blog, Expatriate’s Kitchen, and also contributes to EatLocalChallenge.com, EatDrinkBetter.com, and Ethicurean.com. She lives in Kansas.

Alison Wade Benjamin has worked for big companies, grassroots nonprofits, and the Peace Corps. Still, one of her greatest achievements so far is seeing her children dive into a bowl of kale. She writes the blog Cleaner Plate Club and lives in western Massachusetts.

Available December 2010
ISBN: 978-1-60342-585-8
Childhood obesity. Diabetes. Developmental delays and disorders. Today’s parents know that what their kids eat is key to their health. Their kids are bombarded with a relentless parade of ads for junk food, fast food, and empty calorie “treats.” How can parents get their kids to eat meals that don’t come out of a box?

The Cleaner Plate Club comes to the rescue. Mommy-bloggers Beth Bader and Alison Benjamin offer simple solutions, recipes, meal suggestions, and tips to help parents get kids to eat nonprocessed food that’s been grown locally or organically and — guess what? — enjoy it. They recognize that cooking real food isn’t difficult, but it does require some know-how, which they supply with humor and compassion. Beth and Alison show readers how to prepare foods found at the farmers’ market (and how to substitute, say, asparagus for string beans if need be), plan ahead and estimate prep time, and get used to cooking food that doesn’t come with printed directions. Their fresh advice will help parents eliminate food waste, plan for leftovers, present foods that are appealing to kids, and quit fighting with their children — finally — about food.

The Cleaner Plate Club offers kid-tested recipes for every meal, basic vegetable preparations for farmers’ market finds, and more healthful recipes for sweets and snacks. Readers will also find shopping strategies, the reasons kids like the foods they do, and vegetable profiles (including nutrition information and tips on selection, storage, and preparation). Expert advice and innovative ideas about feeding kids make this book a must-have for any parent. Fresh, funny, and nonjudgmental, The Cleaner Plate Club is a recipe for healthier kids and happier parents.

The Authors:
Beth Bader is a mom determined to make the world a better place for her child, one meal at a time. She writes about her family’s food adventures on her popular blog, Expatriate’s Kitchen, and also contributes to EatLocalChallenge.com, EatDrinkBetter.com, and Ethicurean.com. She lives in Kansas.

Alison Wade Benjamin has worked for big companies, grassroots nonprofits, and the Peace Corps. Still, one of her greatest achievements so far is seeing her children dive into a bowl of kale. She writes the blog Cleaner Plate Club and lives in western Massachusetts.

Available December 2010
ISBN: 978-1-60342-585-8

More info:

Categories:Types, Recipes/Menus
Published by: Storey Publishing on May 19, 2010
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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05/12/2014

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Beth Bader &  Alison W. Benjamin
Recipes and Advicefor Getting Real Kidsto Love Real Food
Free
 of boxes,preservatives,or unnaturaladditives!
 
ake a look
at any children’s menu, at virtually any restaurant,and you might get the idea that kids’ stomachs are gastronomi-cally programmed to digest only a small handul o items: pro-cessed meats, pasta, ried potatoes, and melted cheese. Yet considering the human species was kicking around some 200,000 years beore theinvention o dehydrated cheese powder, it’s a reasonable assumptionthat somewhere along the line, children were willing to eat
something
 else. I you’ve picked up this book, chances are good that you’re inter-ested in that something else, and that you’d like to give your amilysomething other than deep-ried potatoes and processed grains.Here’s the good news: it’s possible. It is possible to eed your am-ily well, to encourage your kids to enjoy kale, or tomatoes, or squash, orbeans, and to instill in them lielong healthy habits. It is possible to teachthem that chickens don’t have ngers and that the very best oods don’tcome emblazoned with cartoon characters. It is possible to serve oodthat brings your amily together, helps children thrive, and gives yourkids the roots they need to someday have healthy amilies o their own.It’s even possible to do all this without a ght.But i you’re reading this, you probably know something else: eat-ing well in a ast-ood world can be a struggle. The struggle ollows useverywhere we go. Take the kids to the community center or swimming 
 
lessons or gymnastics classes, and there’s a good chance you’ll pass junkood and soda vending machines on the way in. Lollipops are passedto children through car windows at the gas station and through tellerwindows at the bank. Candy is oered as a reward or good behavior atschool. A simple trip to the grocery store can be like a mineeld, with17,000 new processed oods introduced yearly and positioned right atchildren’s eye level, with their avorite TV characters on the packaging.Most parents agree that in moderation these treats are ne. Yetthese same parents oten eel besieged by the very oods they don’t mindin moderation. And therein lies the problem: not with any one ood item,but with the accumulation o them, all o those junk ood encounters,one on top o another, moment ater moment, day ater day ater day. Add these encounters to the ood on children’s menus — 94 percent o which is extremely high in calories and devoid o essential vitamins andminerals — and unhealthy caeteria lunches, well-meaning relatives, anendless stream o birthday parties, and those evenings when you needto throw dinner on the table ast. Soon, you might nd that your child’sdiet is more high ructose corn syrup than high nutrition. Somewhere inthere, moderation skipped town.At what moment, exactly, does moderation become excess? Wheredoes a harried parent draw the line in the sand? When do “some” treatsbecome too many? What
should 
kids be eating, anyway?When you cut through all the noise — all the marketing messages,the packaging, the whining, the crying, and the cajoling — the answerto the last question is pretty simple. It’s the same advice you’ll hearrom any experts worth their salt, the same advice you’ve heard sinceyou were a child. Children need lots o ruits and vegetables. They needwhole grains and healthy proteins, and a certain amount o healthy ats.They need vitamins and minerals and micronutrients. The best place toget these things, o course — in act, the only place to get many o them —is through good ood.
GeTTING STaRTeD

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