Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
12Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Deliberating the 2010 Olympic Protests Online: Self-organizing Social Actors Creating Knowledge within Mediated Networks

Deliberating the 2010 Olympic Protests Online: Self-organizing Social Actors Creating Knowledge within Mediated Networks

Ratings: (0)|Views: 114|Likes:
Published by Gary Shilling
Abstract: This paper explores how deliberative democracy is practiced on the Internet by studying online discourse centred on the protests of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver utilizing case study method and critical discourse analysis. Since the evolution of the Olympic games into the modern era, the event has been an arena for political and diplomatic struggle. The tensions of staging the Olympics within an urban centre such as Vancouver were exhibited in the demonstrations and protests and deliberated online by media and individuals alike. This research sought to measure the hegemony of a global event such as the Olympics and determine the effectiveness of the Internet in facilitating deliberative self-organising social actors towards creating knowledge that serves the public good.
Abstract: This paper explores how deliberative democracy is practiced on the Internet by studying online discourse centred on the protests of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver utilizing case study method and critical discourse analysis. Since the evolution of the Olympic games into the modern era, the event has been an arena for political and diplomatic struggle. The tensions of staging the Olympics within an urban centre such as Vancouver were exhibited in the demonstrations and protests and deliberated online by media and individuals alike. This research sought to measure the hegemony of a global event such as the Olympics and determine the effectiveness of the Internet in facilitating deliberative self-organising social actors towards creating knowledge that serves the public good.

More info:

Published by: Gary Shilling on May 23, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/05/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Deliberating the 2010 Olympic Protests Online:Self-organizing Social Actors Creating Knowledge within Mediated NetworksGary Shilling April 26, 2009 Word count: 5916
 
Deliberating the 2010 Olympic Protests Online Gary Shilling 2
Deliberating the 2010 Olympic Protests Online:Self-organising Social Actors Creating Knowledge within Mediated Networks Abstract: This paper explores how deliberative democracy is practiced on theInternet by studying online discourse centred on the protests of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver utilizing case study method and critical discourse analysis. Since theevolution of the Olympic games into the modern era, the event has been an arena forpolitical and diplomatic struggle. The tensions of staging the Olympics within an urbancentre such as Vancouver were exhibited in the demonstrations and protests anddeliberated online by media and individuals alike. This research sought to measure thehegemony of a global event such as the Olympics and determine the effectiveness of theInternet in facilitating deliberative self-organising social actors towards creatingknowledge that serves the public good.Keywords: 2010 Olympics, public protest, deliberative democracy, Internet
 
Deliberating the 2010 Olympic Protests Online Gary Shilling 3
Knowledge is essentially a public good, but in the global information free market there isan antagonism between the creation of social capital and the commodification of information and knowledge. The goal of the exploration herein was to understand how the colliding forces of competition and cooperation are socially shaped andtechnologically mediated in digital space by engaging in a case study that monitoredonline stories around the 2010 Olympic protests in Vancouver, examining the originsand sharing of these stories, and investigating the dialectic that emerged.
 
This study was guided by the understanding that participation is an essentialelement of democracy, where “participation in the political requires communication as itis premised on the articulation, expression or contestation of positions” (Siapera, 2007,p.154). Within this construct of society, critical theory provides an appropriateframework for examining the power dynamic between capitalism and democracy on theInternet. It addresses issues in terms of resource distribution and social struggles— viewing reality in terms of ownership, private property, power, resource control,exploitation, and domination (Fuchs, 2009).Underlying these themes, it is understood that social phenomena do not have linearcauses and effects, but are contradictory, open, dynamic, and conceived of in complexforms (Fuchs, 2009). Critical theory, and by extension critical discourse analysis, isinterested in what society could become, and this inquiry studies the potential for theInternet to foster positive social change. Within dominant critical theory, the FrankfurtSchool sees the increasing corporate control of media reflected in the global convergenceof media industry and technology as an impediment to change, and emancipation

Activity (12)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this
Gary Shilling liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->