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Tai Chi on Psychological Being: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Tai Chi on Psychological Being: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Published by SE Tan
ScienceDaily (May 21, 2010) — Tai Chi, a low impact martial art, has been associated with reduced stress, anxiety and depression, and enhanced mood, in both healthy people and those with chronic conditions. A systematic review of the subject, published in the open access journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, found that although Tai Chi does appear to have positive psychological effects, more high quality, randomized trials are needed.

Dr. Chenchen Wang, Associate Professor, from Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Massachusetts, USA, worked with a team of researchers to pool the results of 40 studies, including 17 randomized controlled trials, into the mental health effects of Tai Chi. She said, "Tai Chi, the Chinese low impact mind-body exercise, has been practiced for centuries for health and fitness in the East and is currently gaining popularity in the West. It is believed to improve mood and enhance overall psychological well being, but convincing evidence has so far been lacking."

Wang and her colleagues found that practicing Tai Chi was associated with reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem. The quality of the studies identified was generally modest, however. In particular, rigorous, prospective, well controlled randomized trials with appropriate comparison groups and validated outcome measures are generally lacking.

Wang said, "More detailed knowledge about the physiological and psychological effects of Tai Chi exercise may lead to new approaches to promote health, treat chronic medical conditions, better inform clinical decisions and further explicate the mechanisms of successful mind-body medicine."

Journal Reference:

Chenchen Wang, Raveendhara Bannuru, Judith Ramel, Bruce Kupelnick, Tammy Scott and Christopher H Schmid. Tai Chi on psychological well-being: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2010
ScienceDaily (May 21, 2010) — Tai Chi, a low impact martial art, has been associated with reduced stress, anxiety and depression, and enhanced mood, in both healthy people and those with chronic conditions. A systematic review of the subject, published in the open access journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, found that although Tai Chi does appear to have positive psychological effects, more high quality, randomized trials are needed.

Dr. Chenchen Wang, Associate Professor, from Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Massachusetts, USA, worked with a team of researchers to pool the results of 40 studies, including 17 randomized controlled trials, into the mental health effects of Tai Chi. She said, "Tai Chi, the Chinese low impact mind-body exercise, has been practiced for centuries for health and fitness in the East and is currently gaining popularity in the West. It is believed to improve mood and enhance overall psychological well being, but convincing evidence has so far been lacking."

Wang and her colleagues found that practicing Tai Chi was associated with reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem. The quality of the studies identified was generally modest, however. In particular, rigorous, prospective, well controlled randomized trials with appropriate comparison groups and validated outcome measures are generally lacking.

Wang said, "More detailed knowledge about the physiological and psychological effects of Tai Chi exercise may lead to new approaches to promote health, treat chronic medical conditions, better inform clinical decisions and further explicate the mechanisms of successful mind-body medicine."

Journal Reference:

Chenchen Wang, Raveendhara Bannuru, Judith Ramel, Bruce Kupelnick, Tammy Scott and Christopher H Schmid. Tai Chi on psychological well-being: systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 2010

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Published by: SE Tan on May 25, 2010
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05/20/2012

 
This Provisional PDF corresponds to the article as it appeared upon acceptance. Fully formattedPDF and full text (HTML) versions will be made available soon.
Tai Chi on psychological well-being: systematic review and meta-analysis
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 
2010,
10
:23 doi:10.1186/1472-6882-10-23Chenchen Wang (cwang2@tuftsmedicalcenter.org)Raveendhara Bannuru (rbannuru@tuftsmedicalcenter.org)Judith Ramel ( jramel@tuftsmedicalcenter.org)Bruce Kupelnick (bkupelnick@tuftsmedicalcenter.org)Tammy Scott (tscot@tuftsmedicalcenter.org)Christopher H Schmid (cschmid@tuftsmedicalcenter.org)
ISSN
1472-6882
Article type
Research article
Submission date
10 December 2009
Acceptance date
21 May 2010
Publication date
21 May 2010
Article URL
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/10/23Like all articles in BMC journals, this peer-reviewed article was published immediately uponacceptance. It can be downloaded, printed and distributed freely for any purposes (see copyrightnotice below).Articles in BMC journals are listed in PubMed and archived at PubMed Central.For information about publishing your research in BMC journals or any BioMed Central journal, go tohttp://www.biomedcentral.com/info/authors/ 
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
 © 2010 Wang
et al.
, licensee BioMed Central Ltd.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0),which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
 
Tai Chi on psychological well-being: systematic review and meta-analysis
Chenchen Wang
1
*
, Raveendhara Bannuru
1
, Judith Ramel
1
, Bruce Kupelnick 
1
, Tammy Scott
2
andChristopher H Schmid
2
 
1
Division of Rheumatology, Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston,Massachusetts, USA.
2
Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts MedicalCenter, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA*Corresponding Author:CW: cwang2@tuftsmedicalcenter.org*RB: rbannuru@tuftsmedicalcenter.orgJR: jtamel@tuftsmedicalcenter.orgBK: bkupelnick@hotmail.comTS: tscott@tuftsmedicalcenter.orgCHS: cschmid@tuftsmedicalcenter.org
 
 
 2
Abstract
Background:
Physical activity and exercise appear to improve psychological health. However,the quantitative effects of Tai Chi on psychological well-being have rarely been examined. Wesystematically reviewed the effects of Tai Chi on stress, anxiety, depression and mooddisturbance in eastern and western populations.
Methods:
Eight English and 3 Chinese databases were searched through March 2009.Randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled studies and observational studiesreporting at least 1 psychological health outcome were examined. Data were extracted andverified by 2 reviewers. The randomized trials in each subcategory of health outcomes
 
were
 
meta-analyzed using a random-effects model.
 
The quality of each study was assessed.
Results:
Forty studies totaling 3817 subjects were identified. Approximately 29 psychologicalmeasurements were assessed. Twenty-one of 33 randomized and nonrandomized trials
 
reportedthat 1 hour to 1 year of regular
 
Tai Chi significantly
 
increased psychological well-beingincluding reduction of stress (effect size [ES], 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.23 to 1.09),anxiety (ES, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.29 to 1.03), and depression (ES, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.80), andenhanced mood (ES, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.69) in community-dwelling healthy participants andin patients with chronic conditions. Seven observational studies with relatively large samplesizes reinforced the beneficial association between Tai Chi practice and psychological health.
Conclusions:
Tai Chi appears to be associated with improvements in psychological well-beingincluding reduced stress, anxiety, depression and mood disturbance, and increased self-esteem.

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