Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan by James Morier

The Adventures of Hajji Baba of Ispahan by James Morier

Ratings: (0)|Views: 18|Likes:
Published by A52372
Still relevant today as to the customs and manners of Persians and the wit of the Isfahanis.
The book starts thus: "My father, Kerbelai Hassan, was one of the most celebrated barbers of Ispahan"

Lord (George) Curzon in his introduction to this book in 1895 writes:
""To explain the history and to elucidate the character of this composite people [Persians] great tomes have been written.I am conscious myself of having added no inconsiderable quota to their bulk; but if all this solid literature were to be burned by an international hangman to-morrow, and were "Hajji Baba" and the "Sketches" of Sir John Malcolm alone to survive, I believe that the future diplomatist or traveller who visited Persia, or the scholar who explored it from a distance, would from their pages derive more exact information about Persian manners, and acquire a surer insight into Persian character, than he would gain from years of independent study or months of local residence."
Still relevant today as to the customs and manners of Persians and the wit of the Isfahanis.
The book starts thus: "My father, Kerbelai Hassan, was one of the most celebrated barbers of Ispahan"

Lord (George) Curzon in his introduction to this book in 1895 writes:
""To explain the history and to elucidate the character of this composite people [Persians] great tomes have been written.I am conscious myself of having added no inconsiderable quota to their bulk; but if all this solid literature were to be burned by an international hangman to-morrow, and were "Hajji Baba" and the "Sketches" of Sir John Malcolm alone to survive, I believe that the future diplomatist or traveller who visited Persia, or the scholar who explored it from a distance, would from their pages derive more exact information about Persian manners, and acquire a surer insight into Persian character, than he would gain from years of independent study or months of local residence."

More info:

Published by: A52372 on May 27, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/02/2010

pdf

text

original

 
THE ADVENTURES OF HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN
BY JAMES MORIERILLUSTRATED BY H.R. MILLAR
WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY THE HON. GEORGE CURZON, M.P.
MACMILLAN AND CO. LONDON AND NEW YORK
1895
Contents
INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTORY EPISTLE
THE ADVENTURES OF HAJJI BABA
CHAPTER I — Of Hajji Baba’s birth and education.CHAPTER II  Hajji Baba commences his travelsHis encounter with the Turcomans, and his captivity.CHAPTER III  Into what hands Hajji Baba falls, and the fortune which his razors proved to him.CHAPTER IV Of his ingenuity in rescuing his masters money from the Turcoman, and of hisdetermination to keep it.CHAPTER V  Hajji Baba becomes a robber in his own defence, andinvades his native city.CHAPTER VI  Concerning the three prisoners taken by the Turcomans, and of the booty made in thecaravanserai.THE ADVENTURES OF HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN1
 
CHAPTER VII  Hajji Baba evinces a feelingdispositionHistory of the poet Asker.CHAPTER VIII  Hajji Babaescapes from the TurcomansThe meaning of ‘falling from the frying-paninto the fire illustrated.CHAPTER IX  Hajji Baba, in his distress, becomes a saka, or water-carrier.CHAPTER X  He makes a soliloquy, and becomes an itinerant vendor of smoke.CHAPTER XI  History of Dervish Sefer, and of two other dervishes.CHAPTER XII  HajjiBaba finds that fraud does not remain unpunished, even in this worldHe makesfresh plans.CHAPTER XIII  Hajji Baba leaves Meshed, is cured of his sprain, and relates a story.CHAPTER XIV  Of the man he meets, and the consequences of the encounter.CHAPTER XV  Hajji Baba reaches Tehran, and goes to the poets house.CHAPTER XVI  He makes plans for the future, and is involved in a quarrel.CHAPTER XVII  He puts on new clothes, goes to the bath, and appears in a new character.CHAPTER XVIII  The poet returns from captivitythe consequences of it for Hajji Baba.CHAPTER XIX  Hajji Baba gets into the service of the kings physicianOf the manner he was firstemployed by him.CHAPTER XX  Hesucceeds in deceiving two of the faculty, getting a pill from one, and a piece of goldfrom the other.CHAPTER XXI — He describes the manner in which the Shah of Persia takes medicine.CHAPTER XXII — Hajji Baba asks the doctor for a salary, and of the success of his demand.CHAPTER XXIII — He becomes dissatisfied with his situation, is idle, and falls in love.CHAPTER XXIV — He has an interview with the fair Zeenab, who relates how she passes her time inthe doctor’s harem.CHAPTER XXV — The lovers meet again, and are very happy—Hajji Baba sings.CHAPTER XXVI — The history of Zeenab, the Cûrdish slave.CHAPTER XXVII — Of the preparations made by the chief physician to receive the Shah as his guest,and of the great expense which threatened him.CHAPTER XXVIII — Concerning the manner of the Shah’s reception; of the present madehim, and the conversation which ensued.The Adventures of Hajji Baba Of Ispahan, by James MorierContents2
 
CHAPTER XXIX — A description of the entertainment, which is followed by an event destructive toHajji Baba’s happiness.CHAPTER XXX — Hajji Baba meets with a rival in the Shah himself, and loses the fair object of hisaffections.CHAPTER XXXI— His reflections on the loss of Zeenab—He is suddenly called upon to exerthis skill as a doctor.CHAPTER XXXII— Hajji is appointed to a situation under government—He becomes anexecutioner.CHAPTER XXXIII — He accompanies the Shah to his camp, and gets some insight into hisprofession.CHAPTER XXXIV — Employed in his official capacity, Hajji Baba gives a specimen of Persiandespotism.CHAPTERXXXV — Fortune, which pretended to frown, in fact smiles upon Hajji Baba, andpromotes him to be sub-lieutenant to the chief executioner.CHAPTER XXXVI — Although by trade an executioner, he shows a feeling heart—He meetswith a young man and woman in distress.CHAPTER XXXVII — The history of Yûsûf,the Armenian, and his wife Mariam.CHAPTER XXXVIII— Sequel of the foregoing history, and of the resolution which Hajji Baba takesin consequence.CHAPTERXXXIX — The Armenian Yûsûf proves himself worthy of Hajji Baba’sconfidence.CHAPTER XL — Hajji Baba gives an account of his proceedings to his superiors, and shows himself a friend to the distressed.CHAPTER XLI — He describes an expedition against the Russians, and does ample justice to thecowardice of his chief.CHAPTER XLII— He proceeds to the king’s camp, and gives a specimen of lying on a grandscale.CHAPTER XLIII — He relates a horrid tale, the consequences of which plunge him in the greatestmisery.CHAPTER XLIV — Hajji Baba meets with an old friend, who cheers him up, gives him good advice,and secures him from danger.CHAPTER XLV— He takes refuge in a sanctuary, where his melancholy thoughts are diverted by acurious story.CHAPTER XLVI — He becomes a saint, and associates with the most celebrated divine in Persia.The Adventures of Hajji BabaOf Ispahan, by James MorierContents3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->